dreadful decision
shang
India > Moving to India? > India Expat Area > Community Forums > You Are Not Alone
#1
| Member

dreadful decision

Spent decades out side India then decided to come back.
what a dissappointing result. Change? where? progressive? where?
Still stinks as it always did.No idea about hygiene,cleanliness,efficiency,manners,politeness so I have concluded that India is not yet civilised and still should be classed as third world country.
Rampant corruption,lack of rules and regulations are the main factors which is decimating this country and it will not survive.
In another two decades this country will be Like Iraq. No saddam types but who would they hang among our politicians who are democratic not dictators. now that is going to be a duilemma for the AMERICANS.[whoa]

115 Replies

#2
| Holly Golightly.. Travelling
So when are you leaving?
#3
| Structural Member
So apart from that, what didn't you like about India? :rolleyes:

It seems to me that many people who spend a lot of time away from India begin to idealise it and forget what it was about India that made them want to leave.
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#4
| Loud Noisy Bird
This site exists because it is peopled by India lovers, but hey, of course it's allowed to talk about the bad stuff too.

Expect there to be people who will stick up for India, but, as Haylo says, some detail would be interesting.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
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#5
| Amreeki OCIcat
I'd love some more detail too, mostly because I dabble with the idea of moving there too.

If it's not too much trouble, could you share some more e.g. you say you came back - does you mean as a tourist or are you OCI/PIO/Indian-origin and there to live long-term?

Sorry, just being curious and also because you came on pretty strong.
#6
| Loud Noisy Bird
In general, though, if we're talking about what is likely to piss a person off about living in India, I can't see anything in shang's post that I'd deny.

Except maybe the thing about manners, which are, often, just culturally different. On the roads, though, I wouldn't even deny that.

However... I live here, and I'm staying!

Maybe it's idealistic (it's certainly theoretical) but I would agree that with a different political ethos, one which placed India and its people first, rather than the egos and the riches of politicians first, India could quickly become a wonderful country.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#7
| Maha Guru Member
Maybe it's idealistic (it's certainly theoretical) but I would agree that with a different political ethos, one which placed India and its people first, rather than the egos and the riches of politicians first, India could quickly become a wonderful country.




Totally agree that it could be a super power, it has some of the best brains and the worst politicians, BUT?

Wow I just saw a big pink animal with wings fly past, going oink oink oink!!!!!!!!!!!!!
#8
| . . . _ _ _ . . .
If India was just like the west, I probably wouldn't visit it again.
#9
| Visionary
One of the major thing that keeps letting India down, is the overpopulation.

There's just too many of us. It's not hard to see why we are not polite and courteous. Unfortunately, this is hardly ever debated in India.

India for decades was a net exporter of wheat and sugar. Through all these years, the production has consistently gone up (bar a few years when monsoon failed), and yet India for the last couple of years has become a net importer, resulting in the prices of these commodities going through the roof.

Govt's & other private corporations can create all the infrastructure they want, if we don't put a lid on the population, it will never make any real difference to people's lives.
#10
| Member

Originally posted by: namaste_cat View Post

I'd love some more detail too, mostly because I dabble with the idea of moving there too.

If it's not too much trouble, could you share some more e.g. you say you came back - does you mean as a tourist or are you OCI/PIO/Indian-origin and there to live long-term?

Sorry, just being curious and also because you came on pretty strong.

yes, I call a spade a spade. some people get carried away with India and it's culture and it's religion also it's history. when you take a deep look you will find it is just a skeleton draped in colourful silk saree.:rolleyes:
#11
| She-who-must-be-obeyed!
And you've hit the nail on the head there, Hal! I remember more than 10 years back when I returned to India for the second time, arriving in Delhi, finding how 'modernized' it was rapidly becoming, how the women were starting to wear that jeans, kurta look and no more traditional garments, feeling rather disappointed.

I would agree with your generalizations, Shang, but India is so multi-layered, places and people not the same everywhere, and one's own attitude must come into play here when viewing the wider picture. I have never regretted my decision to live here, and whilst there are some aspects that may be annoying, frustrating, overall you can have a very fulfilling, happy life here if you want.


cross-posted with LilBoy and Shang - It is the population and lack of education, but slowly improvements are coming and I see it even here. The rubbish collection is improving inside the Fort for instance - now there are bins. Small things slowly... Of course, corruption has a lot to answer for, but also there are improvements on that front if we are to believe the media and the people who are being investigated etc.

Shang - I can't agree with your metaphor - India is not a skeleton, it is on the move well and truly - how long have you been living here now?
Every cloud has a silver lining! :)
#12
| Insert witty title here
Shang,

I pretty much agree with your views, but we gotto live with what we get! :)
SMASH!!!!
#13
| Senior Member
Shang,

Whilst I can understand some of your frustrations having lived and worked in Delhi for 5 years now I do feel your overview is very negative and does not give credit to the very many changes that are taking place in the country right now, especially the capital city.

The infrastructure change in Delhi in the last 5 years has been massive with a large number of construction projects ongoing such as flyovers, metro, footbridges, subway construction, road signage etc. Admittedly, I think the Commonwealth Games being held here in October is pushing the refurbishment and construction agenda but that is no bad thing.

With many large shopping malls having been built in the last few years the number of different items obtainable which were previously not is immense (I can still marvel at what I use to have to pack in my suitcase when I first came here from the UK to the fact that I don't need to pack anymore because everything is available here!)

In regards to manners and politeness, hygiene, cleanliness and efficiency, whilst perhaps not matching the Western expectation, many of these points can be contributed, in some parts, to a lack of education which still affects a large part of the country but one which the Government is trying to improve. Also lack of civic infrastructure is a problem and have to agree anything state controlled or owned is always badly run hence no proper rubbish collection, street cleaning, lack of public toilets, pavements not maintained or not there etc, etc!

Corruption plays a huge part in this and sadly whilst still definitely happening the system is very slowly beginning to see signs of change. In the last 5 years justice has been obtained in some very high profile criminal cases, disproportionate assets are being investigated in high ranking government officials and Chief Ministers. Lots of investigative journalism by news channels and papers is slowly beginning to have an impact and whilst the law does not work fast here I do feel ordinary people are becoming increasingly aware of a sense of justice and the fact that they can fight and win although the battle will be longer and hard fought than in the west. (N.B. there is corruption in the West!)

Lack of rules and regulation, health and safety and human rights. Coming from a country where it is almost impossible to do anything that does not violate/contravene a rule, regulation, health and safety point or someone's human right whilst I realise the need for the above I feel it is essential to keep a perspective on these points. I will agree that there is a need for improvement in relation to the above but I certainly do not want the over regulated system that exists in the UK. I read in the paper a while back that CCTV cameras are going to start making an appearance in Delhi so big brother will watch over people here the way it does in the UK!!

All in all I have to agree with Hal, I certainly would not have come here to have the same experience as London - no point! If you desire the sanitized, highly regulated, big brother approach of a Western/developed country then best to reside in one - may I suggest the UK! However, anyone up for adventure, challenges, frustrations, highs and lows, sunshine most days (very important if you come from the UK!), loving fantastic historical sites, monuments and forts, with a desire to see and learn more about an upcoming, vibrant, colourful and very friendly country - may I suggest India.:)
Indianworker
#14
| Maha Guru Member
Excellent return Post Indianworker.

I think the Central Govt needs to be more Pro Active and monitor
the many so called Chief Ministers of the various States.

Yes there are many frustrating aspects of India, but there are just as many in so called Western Countries, they may not be the
Same frustrations but nevertheless Frustrations in different forms.

Corruption at ALL Levels STILL seems to be one of the major obstacles for India's progress.


Patience & Tolerence is the key to travellers visiting India.
Easier said than done I know ?

Everytime I return from a Trip to India, I usually make the comment to my wife that I probably wouldn't go back,YET I keep
returning for another ADVENTURE time and again.

It's the Amazing Contrasts(some very sad)that blows me away.


vandy :)
#15
| disMember
shang: [ the 'n' makes all the difference! ;) ]
what made you decide to move back in ?
the reason i ask is... it is important, for any move anywhere - to keep the priorities in sight whilst deciding.
usually, keeping them priorities in the focus, the negatives [of the move] are generally dealt with.

i know of folks who've moved back to be close to family.
some moved back to send their kids to school in india [for whatever reason]
some... for them days gone by.

development in india cannot be compared to what one would term 'development' in the west.
the in-your-face chalta hain attitude here, is what is the hardest to deal with, on a day to day basis, i'm guessing.
nothing here, can be compared to how stuff works in the west.
but thats india - b*tching is not going to make things ok... as you must've realised by now.

most folks i know, would or cannot think of returning from the west or down under - for they're used to a certain lifestyle there.
there're alot of us - who have never moved to the west, for them same reasons.
but if a move to cuba ever came up - i'd get on that boat anytime, anyday!!!! ;)


awayfromhome: where are you ? :)
your insight, i think would be most helpful to the OP here.

so shang...
what made you decide to move back ????
didnt you weigh the pro's and con's before you made your decision?
i thought decades in the organised west, would've at least taught you to do that much ;)
just because you were delusional - dont blame it on the country. tsk tsk.





:brishti

ps
have been reading your other rants in them other threads.
i will remove the 'n' from your name, the next time i address you - you'd have earned it.