Ne'er cast a clout till May be out ~ Paris trip report May 2014

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#1 Jun 23rd, 2014, 19:40
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#1
There is an expression in French which goes like this: "En avril, ne te découvre pas d'un fil; au mois de mai fais ce qui te plaît". Which means: "In April, don't take off any (winter) clothing; in the month of May you can do as you please". In England, the weather is not to be trusted as we say traditionally "ne'er cast a clout till May be out", which means Don't take off any (winter) clothing until the end of May. We also say in English, "March winds and April showers make way for May flowers"… hmm…. sometimes true, sometimes unreliable.

From the online press:
Quote:
Meteorologists declared 24 May to have been Paris’s coldest – at just 3.7C – since 1887.

As my other long running Paris travelogue concerns enjoying Winter in the City of Light, this thread is devoted to the (euphemistically) warmer springtime. But don't be fooled ! The temperature is barely (pun intended) different in May compared to November. O.K., enough grizzling. This is to put a grey tone on the upcoming report. Having said that, some of my photographs have a sunny tone too. (Perhaps they were shot in June!)

My idea before we arrived in the city was to spend as much time as possible seeing films and keeping away from the sunny streets, since I am recuperating from a recent eye operation. It was no hardship to attend screenings of black and white thrillers in art house retrospectives. So much so, that using the "carte de fidelité" for regular cinema goers we managed to see more than a dozen of those classic 'films noirs'.

The lure of the windswept and rainy boulevards was too much to withstand. Wearing a variety of hats to suit showers or weak sunshine, and battling with my brolly through crowded pavements and bustling boulevards, we managed to fit in a variety of very long walks. I was thrilled also to get lost a few times, which is quite hard considering how small Paris is and how many maps are available.

My photography this trip was heavily influenced by a directive issued from various IndiaMikers to emphasize the food…

Well, between eating ethnic meals and viewing ethnic films, you will all be forgiven for thinking there is not much Parisian about any of what follows.

Let's start then with some 'touristy' views. We went to see an exhibition at the Branly Museum one day (the exhibition entitled "Indiens des Plaines" (Plains Indians) about Native Americans in North America, both USA and Canada, which was very interesting, though very crowded. Another time we saw an Impressionist exhibition at the Musée Marmottan and it was like visiting old friends, seeing these well-loved paintings. The most exciting exhibition we saw was at the Georges Pompidou Centre, a photo retrospective of the work of Henri Cartier-Bresson. There were more than five hundred of his photographs on display. I had also intended to go the Institut du Monde Arabe to visit the hugely popular Orient Express Exhibition, which is going to be showing all summer. But due to the crowds I did not do so. Train buffs will forgive me.

Paris seen from the top of the Centre Georges Pompidou, aka Beaubourg


The Eiffel Tower gets into the game (Roland Garros tennis tournament)

Viewing the lovelocks on the Pont de l'Archevêché
#2 Jun 23rd, 2014, 19:42
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#2
Ohhhh I'd love to go to Paris. So romantic!

Did you eat snails?
#3 Jun 23rd, 2014, 19:46
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#3
Without further hesitation, let's launch (not lunch) straight into "les gourmandises" or foodie delights.

Deux Mille Feuilles (Mr TD's favourite cake, ever)



Lemon Tart (my fave)



Deux 'hot-dogs'
#4 Jun 23rd, 2014, 19:46
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#4
Ne'er cast a clout till May be out refers to the may blossom, not the month.

Look forward to more pix, hope it is warm now in Crete and the red dust has gone
#5 Jun 23rd, 2014, 19:46
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#5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fing Fang View Post Ohhhh I'd love to go to Paris. So romantic!

Did you eat snails?

Umm, not recently, Fing Fang.
#6 Jun 23rd, 2014, 19:47
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#6
Quote:
Originally Posted by fsg View Post Ne'er cast a clout till May be out refers to the may blossom, not the month.

Look forward to more pix, hope it is warm now in Crete and the red dust has gone

That is an alternative theory on the expression… yes.


Indeed.
#7 Jun 23rd, 2014, 20:47
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#7
I love the photos, theyyamdancer! I would love to visit Paris some day, it looks amazing. And the food looks so good!

Thanks for sharing these with us!
#8 Jun 23rd, 2014, 20:53
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#8
No sooner had I posted here, whoosh, my internet connection disappeared. Oh the joys of living in Greece.

Well, now we can have another look at the exhibition shown at the Musée Branly, which showcased some amazing Native American artefacts, both clothing items, jewellery and sculpture. Photography was difficult due to the reflective glass encasing the displays.












Let me also add some photographs from the Henri Cartier-Bresson exhibition







Last edited by theyyamdancer; Jun 23rd, 2014 at 23:41.. Reason: Added some photos of photos
#9 Jun 23rd, 2014, 21:03
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Afterwards we walked across the pedestrian bridge (Passerelle Debilly) and towards the Palais de Tokyo where we took refuge from the rain in a very new restaurant/café called Monsieur Bleu, which has perhaps the best hot chocolate in town. It is so new that there was no sign to show where we were. It was only upon discovering the match books inside that we discovered the name. The waitress was extremely friendly and added as she served "I have filled the pot right to the top", which was very kind of her and totally unexpected.

Fortified with the hot drink, a long wait at the number 63 bus stop was not arduous and afforded a chance to complain with everyone else waiting in the wind and rain about how that bus is always slow. Then we did not care much, as we had time to kill before seeing a film at the art house cinema "Action Christine" on the left bank. Huddling under the doorways with raindrops dripping on our heads, we were glad to dive inside. There are so many of these cinemas in the area of the 6th and 5th arrondissements, which make Paris the cinema capital of the world. The "Action Ecoles", the "Desperado", and the "Grand Action", as well as the three cinemas on the rue Champollion, are all similarly devoted to showing old films.

At the risk of boring some of you, and incurring the moderators' wrath, here are some of the films we viewed during the month of May, a retrospective called "Films Noirs Américains" (American Thrillers), mainly black and white and dating from the forties or the fifties or even earlier:

"Kiss Me Deadly" by Robert Aldrich, made in 1955
"Ruggles of Red Gap" by Leo McCarey, made in 1935
"The Sea Wolf" by Michael Curtiz, made in 1941
"Fallen Angel" by Otto Preminger, made in 1945
"On Dangerous Ground" by Nicholas Ray, made in 1951
"Kiss the Blood Off My Hands" by Norman Foster, made in 1948
"The Night of the Hunter" by Charles Laughton, made in 1955
"Born to Kill" by Robert Wise, made in 1947
"Asphalt Jungle" by John Huston, made in 1950



Paris seen from the marble steps of the Palais de Tokyo, looking towards the Eiffel Tower
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Last edited by theyyamdancer; Jun 23rd, 2014 at 22:28.. Reason: typo
#10 Jun 23rd, 2014, 21:48
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#10
Thank you very much Fing Fang, fsg, Vaibhav, Julia, Daisy, Narendra, trisha, Prakaant, for your appreciation.
#11 Jun 23rd, 2014, 22:02
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I am guessing that some of you are wondering where are all the foodie pics aforementioned?

Is it dinner time yet?

OK, dedicated to nayan and brishti, amongst others, who pestered me for pics of Parisian delicacies, here we go on a tour of French, vegan, Iranian, Ethiopian and Vietnamese specialities.

Gratin dauphinois - a dish I made with potatoes and lots of garlic and cream.


Potato, Beetroot, Haricots verts, with a dressing of Yoghurt and Wasabi (on the left) and Orange, Apple and Ginger Juice (on the right)….. This combo will get anything standing straight again…..



Iranian flatbreads and a most yummy salad (tarragon, mint and basil, with tomato, cucumber, radishes, white cheese and tomatoes)


Duck with a sauce of walnuts and pomegranates



An Ethiopian feast



Bo Bun (a Vietnamese speciality) in Belleville
#12 Jun 23rd, 2014, 22:06
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#12
Thats gotta be one of the best looking dinners ever! Making me hungry..
#13 Jun 23rd, 2014, 22:08
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#13
Oh Fing, they were not all eaten on one day. God forbid!
#14 Jun 23rd, 2014, 22:13
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#14
Quote:
Originally Posted by theyyamdancer View Post Oh Fing, they were not all eaten on one day. God forbid!
Haha of course not... that would be a mighty feast otherwise
#15 Jun 23rd, 2014, 22:16
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#15
Actually, I can share some addresses here at this point.

For Vietnamese - Lao Siam, rue de Belleville, 19eme This is an old favourite.
For Ethiopian - Menelik, rue Sauffroy, 17eme. Amazing place. Highly recommended.
For Iranian - La Cheminée, rue des Entrepreneurs, 15eme. Also note three or four grocers stocking Iranian produce in the same street.
For vegan + other interesting fusion foods - Nanashi (various locations in Paris)


For the amazing sweets seen in an earlier post -

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