Building a house in Kumaon hills

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#31 Sep 8th, 2009, 21:20
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#31
You mean you will do without a house! The chair would suffice? I can do even without a chair. I would just lie down on grass or rock where there is sun.

But if someone is building a house and spending money, a person might take some of these things into consideration.
#32 Sep 9th, 2009, 00:34
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Most houses are constructed as joined up boxes of different sizes, so prana and light flow is hindered, plus this tends to trap heat. Cross flow and larger spaces stay cooler and appear bigger, you only really need box bedrooms and bathrooms, everything else can be open plan as we have made. Therefore even in the height of summer radiation is a negligible factor and a fan is not essential, but we do use sometimes.

Catching the sun in winter is essential i feel. If you live in the hills then you know that as soon as you are in the shadows then it's cold. In the valleys, or in houses next to hills where the low sun gets obscured, or rises late and sets early it becomes very nippy, winter rains can make it days on end of zero sun. Summer heat is not the problem whereas winter warmth very much is.
#33 Sep 9th, 2009, 00:41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delhiwala View Post Although it's apparent from your post that you do not like uninvited guests, but someday I would like to see your house.......
That's nice of you... I think you know the way already? Don't mind the 4 dogs though, they only bite on command.... Misty, wet, mysterious tonight, something was prowling around outside, several chorus of barking, especially Phoebe the Labrador who can smell a rusk at 100 Mts, maybe Bagh or snorting porcupines in the bush.. Ooooooohhhhh
#34 Sep 9th, 2009, 01:08
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I knew it....

Quote:
..it's apparent from your post that you do not like uninvited guests...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paleface View Post That's nice of you... I think you know the way already? Don't mind the 4 dogs though, they only bite on command.... Misty, wet, mysterious tonight, something was prowling around outside, several chorus of barking, especially Phoebe the Labrador who can smell a rusk at 100 Mts, maybe Bagh or snorting porcupines in the bush.. Ooooooohhhhh
I did not fully understand the dread term "Terminal Illness" until I saw Terminal 1 D of Delhi Airport.
#35 Sep 9th, 2009, 11:23
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Nice thread there Sharmaji, Paleface and DW2 (forgive me, for DW is for you-know-who). Very interesting insights (Paleface - what a surprise...). Soaking in the Kumaoni (Mukteshwar-i) mists sitting 12 timezones away. Thanks guys.
#36 Sep 9th, 2009, 12:14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainlad View Post Nice thread there Sharmaji, Paleface and DW2 (forgive me, for DW is for you-know-who). Very interesting insights (Paleface - what a surprise...). Soaking in the Kumaoni (Mukteshwar-i) mists sitting 12 timezones away. Thanks guys.
Here with our heads in the clouds - literally, it has barely stopped raining or drizzling for the past 3 days, weather has changed and winter cometh, looking forward to a dazzling October.
#37 Sep 9th, 2009, 17:16
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Yes, Paleface, open architecture if it suits people (It will reduce the cost of walls).
#38 Sep 9th, 2009, 21:47
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#38
Yeah, and you can make half wall bookshelves or divider seating arrangements, even space for a cast iron stove (can anyone help me source a cast iron stove? I know they are made in China, even Chinese ones available in Kashmir).

A combination of wooden piles, supporting a MS steel pipe deck/verandah, under which is wood store, tool shed etc, and cutting into the hillside could be workable here asd the house weight would be on the cut in foundations, not on the piles, but the piles enable one to cantilever six feet or so beyond them, lot of extra sitting out unobstructed vista watching space, thus enlarging the living room space illusion through central floor to 7 ft sliding verandah doors?
#39 Sep 9th, 2009, 22:00
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#39
Paleface, cast iron stove for what? Cooking? Heating? Where do you want to place it? Give me a chance, I will think of an out of the world innovative appliance (do what nobody has ever done type).

Google has ample information, text and images, on "Building a house on a slope, hill, stilts, etc."
#40 Sep 9th, 2009, 22:37
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Heating, as in these Chinwallahs - http://www.fireplace-carving.com/sto...eplace_1b.html

What i really might build is an old style eastern european/ Russian Kachelofen... google it. And before you tell me i would have to cut down half the forests ofUT to fuel the thing, it's not so, highly efficient no wastage of gases and you can build a long flue to channel the heat around.
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stove.jpg Kachelofan.jpg Kachelofan 2.jpg 
#41 Sep 9th, 2009, 23:59
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How about heat dissipators like those behind a fridge (coil) in a rectangular shape to be placed as area dividers and connected to your fire place? The same as we do with a split air-conditioner, cooling at one place and conduits to other places. No need to waste heat by pushing it out through a flue. The idea is not to let hot air go out of the house till it gets cooled. Get the maximum out of heat.
#42 Sep 10th, 2009, 01:21
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#42

Question

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Originally Posted by mountainlad View Post DW is for you-know-who
Yes, a lot of us know, but where is he? Missing, haven't seem him anywhere?
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A lot still pending though...............
#43 Sep 10th, 2009, 08:27
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Paleface, the idea is from Ladakh houses where there is no chimney, so that all heat remains in the room/house. We may experiment as to what length of pipe it takes for the hot air to cool and arrive at a diameter of pipe which will allow us to keep the air hot to the distance we want.
#44 Sep 10th, 2009, 09:10
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VK, it is not essential to have a rectangular design for the house. Here is one with a v-shaped design - hugging the contour. The two arms of the v can be anchored in ground, while the bottom of the v can be put on stilts (one or three). See a rough sketch here: http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/...00145658SAREvW
#45 Sep 10th, 2009, 10:22
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Yes, I get the idea, expanding further...
The central RCC structure is somewhat of a spine well embedded into the cut out and has all the heavy storages/items including may be stone walls? And then, rest of the lighter structure can radiate out from this, supported on stilts and having cantilevered balconies.
Should be possible to design the "boxes" of Bedroom(s) and Bathrooms (and may be part kitchen) to the central RCC / stone heavy structure and the rest - viz. living/ drawing /dining / sit-outs on stilt-supported / cantilevered floors. The light cement-sheet roof can overhang to cover these. In this way the load footprint of the house is greatly reduced.
Great idea, appreciate it.

Heat conservation:
That would be to some extent closer to my line of work. The flues should not be directly used to heat the living environment as there are choking risks from CO and CO2. Guiding the flues thru long channels has its problems - some of them are...
1) The hot gases tend to rise up hence it is difficult to channel downwards without any exhaust fan.
2) It can be difficult to distribute in branches and can lead to variable temperatures.
3) For routine soot removal the design has to be uncomplicated and robust - soot fires can be devastating.

Though there are many ways for efficient heating at widely varying prices - the one that takes the cake is a simple homedesigned radiator(the dissipator in Aupmanyav's post) with indirect heat transfer.
Basically, a fluid (thermal oil or distilled water mixed with glycol (car-coolant)) is filled up in a closed circuit maze of pipes having a heating tube-nest(boiler) at the bottom-most location.
As the fluid is heated by wood fire / kerosene / gas , it gently rises up into the branchwork of pipes to heat the system and is routed back thru wider diameter 'downcomers'.
Now, as the budget allows, one can have proper radiators connected to the pipes with a cock at inlet to control the temperature. Or else during the making of the house, pipes can be laid into the floors - the larger the surface area of the pipes, the better is the heat transfer. The usual flow calculations have to be carried out to decide upon the various diameters of the pipes. An always open bypass/relief line has to be present for releasing any extra pressure builup if all the valves are shut off.
The advantages of this system are -
- the soot is limited to a small area
- easy to disribute thru small dia pipes(copper, steel)
- easy to control zone temperatures by adjusting the flow by valves at every inlet
- the fliud used does not form scales, reducing maintenance to just boiler cleaning, not required if using gas.
- A very small fire can heat up a large area without any heat-loss.
- The warm flue exhaust can be used to pre-warm the domestic water by a separate tube-nest in winters.
and so on ...
I am beginning to sound like a marketing executive.
What I have described is just a domestic version of the modern efficient marine steam boilers having finned tubes / economisers / pre-heaters which makes them atleast 50% more heat efficient than our cooking stoves.

Aupmanyav, the V-shape design may be well suited for the topography but may not be much useful here as the north view is the USP. Max 25 ft depth is most suitable as it allows for utilities to be placed in the back and all other spaces in the front in view of the snow peaks. However, a gentle thin C shape can be considered.
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