Warning: Drugging at Sasaram train station Bihar

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#46 Aug 25th, 2008, 03:08
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  • machadinha is offline
#46
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Originally Posted by federica View Post I can't understand why you are blaming yourself trusting strangers. You should have reported your experience to the police
It's nonsense yes, and makes me doubt the entire story. Which was a little wordy for, er, basically a non-story anyway.
#47 Sep 9th, 2008, 23:47
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  • jacklemmon is offline
#47
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Originally Posted by machadinha View Post It's nonsense yes, and makes me doubt the entire story. Which was a little wordy for, er, basically a non-story anyway.
I just saw the replies to my post. I repeat this is a true story. It happened to me in early 2008. The boys said they were from Rajasthan. I met them on the street the first time. I met them on the street the second time. They drugged my drink this time. and stole my posessions. I did not go to the police as I felt it was not worth the bother and I wouldn't recover my stuff. Upon reflection, I figured that this was a gang of criminals (though they look so innocent young boys you would never guess).

Cheers and safe travels.
#48 Sep 10th, 2008, 01:37
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  • Haylo is offline
#48
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Originally Posted by jacklemmon View Post You are not hurting their feelings - they don't have any in the first place - and are probably trying to 'humor this clown' by offering you food in the first place.
In my view, the probability is that if you are offered food, it is a genuine offer. That is not to say you should accept, I have never done so out of concerns for an already dodgy stomach, and yes there are a small minority of people who are out to cause harm.

But to assume nobody has any feelings and that everyone is out to get me is not a stance that I am prepared to consider adopting.

If one day that gets me into trouble, at least I have embraced life to the full.
#49 Sep 10th, 2008, 02:02
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#49
So far as the railway thieves are concerned, you might be surprised at the amount of advertising budget that gets spent on warning people about this risk, and you should take account of this in the context that this is not a "For you own safety, please do not..." nanny culture like the UK. It is a piss off and look after yourself culture!
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
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#50 Sep 10th, 2008, 04:44
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  • Brisso is offline
#50
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Originally Posted by jacklemmon View Post I just saw the replies to my post. I repeat this is a true story. It happened to me in early 2008. The boys said they were from Rajasthan. I met them on the street the first time. I met them on the street the second time. They drugged my drink this time. and stole my posessions. I did not go to the police as I felt it was not worth the bother and I wouldn't recover my stuff. Upon reflection, I figured that this was a gang of criminals (though they look so innocent young boys you would never guess).

Cheers and safe travels.
I have also encountered some very sharp scammers in Gangtok - there is a thinly disguised minor underworld in that town.
#51 Dec 21st, 2008, 16:02
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#51
I know this is an old post already well-commented on, but I think I have something new to add: Indians *know* about drugging on trains. They see the same signs all over the stations warning people not to accept food or drink, and they all know someone or know of someone who was drugged on a train. With their knowledge of that, and their knowing that foreigners are bigger targets for such crime because of their bigger wallets, it's mildly insensitive for an Indian to offer food/drink to a foreigner on a train in the first place. And if the offerer is persistent after the first polite declination, then that's even more insensitive. Once they offer you food/drink, you're in a lose-lose situation: You either have to be embarrassed by refusing their offer, or you have to put yourself at risk by accepting it. Truly considerate people won't put you in that situation. That's why I have no qualms about politely refusing food/drink on trains and platforms 100% of the time. They shouldn't have offered in that situation. And in any event, my personal safety trumps possibly offending someone any day.

I don't know what percentage of Indians agree that it's insensitive to offer food/drink to foreigners on trains given the climate and risks, but I think it's sizable. I've been warned on more than one occasion by fellow (Indian) travelers on trains not to accept food/drink from strangers -- and I'm certain these warnings were given genuinely, and were not a case of people trying to gain my trust by only pretending to look after my welfare.
#52 Dec 21st, 2008, 16:53
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  • anar is offline
#52
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Originally Posted by Haylo View Post In my view, the probability is that if you are offered food, it is a genuine offer. That is not to say you should accept, I have never done so out of concerns for an already dodgy stomach, and yes there are a small minority of people who are out to cause harm.

But to assume nobody has any feelings and that everyone is out to get me is not a stance that I am prepared to consider adopting.

If one day that gets me into trouble, at least I have embraced life to the full.
i prefer this approach.

my boyfriend and i were stuck on a train in the middle of nowhere (between bijapur and kolhapur - i think it qualifies) for six hours with nothing to eat between the two of us. some farmers travelling in the same compartment offered us their thick millet rotis which we accepted with gratitude. saved the day.

you need to weigh each situation as it occurs. use some common sense. don't miss out on experiencing genuine acts of kindness and hospitality - it is one of the highlights of travelling in india as a foreigner.
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