Tea making by IRCTC caterers
bsprasad
India > India Travel Basics > India Travel > Scams and Annoyances in India
#16
| retired

Originally posted by: thejag View Post

the location does not look like a toilet..


In daytime trains (mostly in 2S, but sometimes in CC) you have storage space for catering staff in the place a toilet would usually be.

Also, in the Pantry car of long distance trains you may also have similar spaces.

And in general, I've long since forgotten how many times I've seen the Chai Wallahs filling up their containers with ready made chai from station based chai sellers.
#17
| Maha Guru Member
And pray ; what is the heater running on?

My grouse is different; as a diabetic I like to have sugarless teas which in the current scenario of contracted caterers and service I am often not able to obtain. I miss the days of better personalised service of yore!
#18
| Senior Member

moothra tea

Steven..Amazing presence of mind.

Even,I have had un-countable cups of tea in indian railways..and never got sick because of that..

May be,we have got immune to 'toilet water' huh !!..

But ! you know what !.. In tamil nadu,it is quite common to see people commenting on the irctc tea as 'Moothra tea". ( Tea that tastes s if urine is mixed...).. It doen't mean exactly,but sort of a metaphor indicating very bad quality tea..

Sorry for using such a poor word,but that is the fact..

Sriram.B
#19
| has arrived

Originally posted by: dillichaat View Post

Sorry to hear about that,can imagine it must have been hell. Why didn't you take a plane? There's direct flights from Chennai to Pune, you can stand there in 1.5 hours for around 5000 Rs. Leave in the morning, do the interview smelling like a rose -ok, a slightly wilted one, plane travel isn't high luxury either- and be back home at night. No hotel costs, no hassles with meals (if the airline doesn't strike, that is).


The prospect of spending close to 10K without any chance of it being reimbursed..... i spent close to 1200 bucks on the train and hotel... and i got the job so alls well that ends well... I
fear i wont be able to visit home as often as i used to when i was in mumbai... a Round trip between Chennai and Mum then was 10~20% of my monthly salary and i still could escape only once in 6 to 8 weeks. Now the rates are anywhere between 3 to 5 times of what i used to pay then and my salary is back to the same level....


Originally posted by: steven_ber View Post

In daytime trains (mostly in 2S, but sometimes in CC) you have storage space for catering staff in the place a toilet would usually be.

Also, in the Pantry car of long distance trains you may also have similar spaces.

And in general, I've long since forgotten how many times I've seen the Chai Wallahs filling up their containers with ready made chai from station based chai sellers.


[praiseyou [praiseyou [praiseyou

Originally posted by: Gametotravel View Post

And pray ; what is the heater running on?

My grouse is different; as a diabetic I like to have sugarless teas which in the current scenario of contracted caterers and service I am often not able to obtain. I miss the days of better personalised service of yore!


My parents too are diabetic... they dont travel much but make it a point to travel via Rajdhani when going to delhi... no problem in getting tea without sugar in a flask... come to think of it... twas the same when we traveled in the garib rath train last year Edit: or atleast i think so. ive done so much traveling in trains this last year that its all a big puzzle to me...
meh...
#20
| Dosai, Idli, Sambar eating Member
Sorry I'm going to get technical.. I'm really confused by the concern here. The element of that immersion heater probably heats up to 500 degrees celsius. More than plenty to kill off any bacteria that might have accumulated during storage. Also, if they really are brewing up with tea bags in as shown, that tea water will be on the boil for a few minutes.

Why is this any worse than other forms of heating water for tea? In any case, this is not the normal form of boiling water on trains and must have been done as something else was not working. The pantry cars have gas burners. Using electricity for such high load applications is not preferred on trains at all.

In any case, isn't the konkan railway still a diesel line? If so, the power for this immersion heater is coming via an alternator. Even on electric trains, overhead power is not normally used for significant loads other than traction, especially the further you get from the engine.
#21
| Member

Hoax

I would say its a hoax for the following reasons ...

1. The WC/Indian Toilet is not visible. I've never seen a train toilet that is so big that you cannot see the commode in the picture.

2. The first pic with the boy. Observe the wall has an Iron rod. Never seen this design in any train where an Iron rod is protruding on the wall.

3. The power on trains is DC and max 110v which can charge a laptop at max. Not sufficient to run a coil heater. Moreover these old toilets do not even have a power socket.

:confused:
#22
| Naan.tering Nabob
That scene in "A Passage to India' comes to mind where Mrs. Moore sees the cook preparing breakfast next to the train cabin toilet & vents to Adela - 'A rather strange place to do the cooking' .... perhaps old habits die hard.[shock]
We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time. ~
T. S. Eliot

http://www.derekgrantdigital.com

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