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-   -   Gem Scam (https://www.indiamike.com/india/scams-and-annoyances-in-india-f8/gem-scam-t142411/)

DaisyL Aug 8th, 2011 22:49

Gem Scam
 
Here is the scam I ran into in Jaipur. My driver said he wanted to take me to see his guru (as far as Iím concerned, my driver is part of the scam and should not be trusted. His name is Khan). Khan is Muslim, and as far as I know, Muslims do not have gurus. I could be wrong. Guru (no other name, just guru) is half Indian and half Canadian. He is only in India three months out of the year, and lucky me, he was in India the same time I was. Khan asked me if I wanted my fortune told. I had my palm read in Bikaner last year and the palm reader nailed my past perfectly. The future things he told me havenít happened, but they still could. I thought it would be great to have my future told, so I said yes.

We pull up outside of a gem store, and I instantly know what is going on. I know that I will be told that my health and/or happiness will depend on my buying gems from guru. This is something I read about on IndiaMike. I realize at once that I am in for a scam, but I think it will be interesting to go ahead with it.

I am told to wait in a gem room for guru. He comes in with this haughty look like heís better than everyone else. I already know what will probably happen, so I wait for it to unfold. He asks my name and then explains chakras to me. This is the aligning of energy places on your body. This is a belief that many people have, and it upsets me that guru uses this belief to scare people into giving him money. This makes him no better than a tele-evangelist in America. The message can be good for believers, but when someone takes the message and uses it for their own profit, they are scammers.

I asked about his reading my future and was told that he could do a complete astrological chart for me, but it would take 48 hours. I didnít have 48 hours, and I had a feeling it would be really expensive, and I already knew he was a fraud, so I gave up on that. He said he could read my aura. I told him that would be good, but Iím not buying any gems. He seemed a little surprised, and told me that it is up to me, but after people hear what he has to say, they usually ask what they can do to correct their problems. He himself wears a corrective gem. I told him that is all very nice, but Iím not buying any gems.

He tells me that my aura is large and it is blue. Itís 80% blue and 20% violet. He says that the violet is right there across my t-shirt (Iím wearing a kurti). He said that the violet should not be there and itís causing me problems in life. Just by hearing about this, the 20% will grow and if I donít correct it, I can land in the hospital. He asked if my hands were clean and then put a gem in my right hand. He said, ďSomeone in your family has been sick.Ē I said, ďUmÖyes.Ē He asked who has been sick and I said my mother. He asked which sickness and I said cancer. He said that when my mother was pregnant with me someone was draining her energy, and then the energy from me. I have always had unbalanced chakras, but it gets worse as I get older. My motherís cancer is from unbalanced chakras which could be corrected with the correct gems. If I donít fix my chakras, Iíll be sick, too.

Here are the problems I have now that will get worse if I donít get them corrected with gems.

1. Sometimes I have a lot of energy and sometimes I donít.
2. Sometimes I eat a lot and sometimes I donít eat much at all.
3. My divorce was caused by the fact that sometimes I am up and sometimes I am down and it was hard for my husband to understand me. This also makes relationships hard for me.
4. While I claim to be creative now, that will diminish if I donít correct the violet in my aura.
5. I have problems with communication that will get worse if I donít correct the violet in my aura.
6. I have pain in my shoulders, knees, lower back, and ankles which will increase unless I correct the violet in my aura.

Here is how he did:

1. Yes, just like everyone else.
2. Yes, just like everyone else.
3. Not even close.
4. I am creative, and I feel most people are, whether they recognize it or not. I donít feel in danger of losing my creativity.
5. Yes, communication has always been a problem for me, and is something I should probably work on.
6. No, while I sometimes have some pain in my right knee, I didnít in while I was in India, and itís not really a problem.

I told him that some of the things he said were true, and some were not. But Iím not afraid of life, I am not going to live in fear because life is full of ups and downs. I will probably be in the hospital at some time, I will probably get sick, and surely at some point I will die. Right now Iím very happy with my life. I donít need any gems.

He was not happy with what I said. He said, ďIf you donít want to correct your chakras, thatís your choice. But you must not tell anyone what was said here. If you do, you will end up with big trouble. The violet in your aura will grow at an amazing speed and you will end up in the hospital. Thatís not me that says that, that is the way it is.Ē

I know this scam has been reported here before, but I have not seen what the guru has told people before. I wanted everyone to see what guru told me. I don't know if it's the same for every person or not, but parts of it are very generic. Thanks to IndiaMike, I know this scam and did not even come close to buying any gems.

machadinha Aug 8th, 2011 22:53

Ah, yes, the http://www.indiamike.com/india/scams...m-scam-t10754/... (and contrary to that title, it extends over no small parts of Asia of course, and probably beyond).

They have something called "balletje-balletje" where I live; "ballie-ballie," you know, involving three cups and a little ball. No, you never win, though you typically will at first, to get you going.

Anyway, it certainly deserves a decent reminder sometimes. So, thanks :)

DaisyL Aug 8th, 2011 23:02

Quote:

Originally Posted by machadinha (Post 1239727)
They have something called "balletje-balletje" where I live; "ballie-ballie," you know, involving three cups and a little ball. No, you never win, though you typically will at first, to get you going.

Yes, I know that game. I've never seen it other than in movies, but you're right, you don't win.

machadinha Aug 8th, 2011 23:08

Quote:

Originally Posted by DaisyL (Post 1239735)
Yes, I know that game. I've never seen it other than in movies

True, to be honest, I don't see it a lot here anymore, either; used to be quite common for a while.

The gems + someone "reading" you would seem like a clever addition, no. Someone once left a similar report, of course involving them "paying as you please" (plus some undefined orphanage thrown into the mix -- one might ask oneself what does that have to do with either my chakras or a personal healing stone, I guess, but I'm really not making fun of it, it's easy to get dragged along) -- but it of course being clear that ought not be too little: http://www.indiamike.com/india/scams...-real-t114967/

(Come to think of it, hm, Jaipur, and rebalancing your chakras and stuff -- sounds oddly familiar, no?)

Quote:

Originally Posted by DaisyL (Post 1239724)
“If you don’t want to correct your chakras, that’s your choice. But you must not tell anyone what was said here.

Guess maybe the guy reads IndiaMike? ;) :rofl: <-- Laughing at the thought of it, Daisy, not at you. These folks can be so convincing, no, I've gotten very close to falling for it myself.

DaisyL Aug 8th, 2011 23:16

Thanks for showing me that thread, machadinha. Yes, when he had his energy read, that would probably be the same as having my aura read. I didn't even ask about the gem prices, but I couldn't have paid 150 USD for gems. [whoa]

Yes, when guru told me that I couldn't tell anyone what was said there, what else could I do but go on IndiaMike and tell everyone? :)

suricate Aug 8th, 2011 23:53

How come My Name is Khan didn't work this time?! ;)
.

DaisyL Aug 8th, 2011 23:55

Quote:

Originally Posted by suricate (Post 1239764)
How come My Name is Khan didn't work this time?! ;)
.

And I'm not a terrorist. :)

NYTim Aug 8th, 2011 23:58

Idiot
 
Knowing better I waltzed into a travel agent in New Delhi. Idiot me. What an experience. Once I decided I did not need their services, I started to walk out. A man blocked the entrance and told me I HAVE to book tours with this agency as it was against the law to use any other means of getting around. Strange logic indeed. I pushed him aside and walked out but he followed me for at least 100 yards shouting, "Saar,saar, why are you so hostile? I said two words to him first one starts with an F ends in K and U and C are in the middle followed by off. This was not enough so I strode into the State Emporium on Janpath and he gave up his pursuit or so I thought. When I came out after an hour he accosted me again. I descended into the Metro at Connaught Place, and I never saw him again. I realized that this tactic must work some of the time or he would have abandoned his pursuit.

DaisyL Aug 9th, 2011 00:02

Oh my gosh! [whoa]

Talk about intimidation! He followed you, that is scary! I'm glad you walked away and didn't see him again.

PeakXV Aug 9th, 2011 00:04

That's appalling to hear about the depths that these scoundrels will go to make a quick buck.:mad::mad:

Imagine/behold - the balls - the desperation - attempting to lay some kind of a voodoo-whammy -black cloud over a traveler's conscience - should they not overpay for one of their phony piece-of-junk stones.:ThumbsDow:ThumbsDow :ThumbsDow

machadinha Aug 9th, 2011 00:08

Can't say it surprises me. Not after having traveled in India.

Once you get used to it, it's mostly a laugh. Can be more difficult before, or sometimes even after. (I mean I'll still run into it from time to time, and don't always find it so easy to extract myself from it. And no few of you are far more well-traveled there than I am.)

Let me add btw I ran into very little nonsense on my last two two-month trips, these past two years. Depends a little on what you exude, and where you go, no doubt. But so I'm equally tired of this "They're all out to con you" kind of idea with no few. No, the way I've found it, they're really not. Amazingly hospitable and generous and forthcoming people, for the most part, really.

DaisyL Aug 9th, 2011 00:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by PeakXV (Post 1239773)
That's appalling to hear about the depths that these scoundrels will go to make a quick buck.:mad::mad:

Imagine/behold - the balls - the desperation - attempting to lay some kind of a voodoo-whammy -black cloud over a traveler's conscience - should they not overpay for one of their phony piece-of-junk stones.:ThumbsDow:ThumbsDow :ThumbsDow

Yes, I can only imagine how much he charges for his gems (read: phony piece-of-junk stones). I would guess that the more worried the person is, the more he would charge for them.

DaisyL Aug 9th, 2011 00:19

Quote:

Originally Posted by machadinha (Post 1239776)
Amazingly hospitable and generous and forthcoming people, for the most part, really.

I agree with this, machadinha! Most of the people I've met in India are wonderful. I enjoy talking to them, and they are willing to help me when I need it. I love India, and the people are the reason why I hope to continue traveling there. A few people tried to scam me, but many, many more were very nice to me. :)

Nick-H Aug 9th, 2011 00:28

Quote:

He said, “If you don’t want to correct your chakras, that’s your choice. But you must not tell anyone what was said here. If you do, you will end up with big trouble. The violet in your aura will grow at an amazing speed and you will end up in the hospital. That’s not me that says that, that is the way it is.”
What a shame you didn't manage to get a photo of him. You could have posted that too!

I think this is a hard, manipulative, emotionally-blackmailing and thoroughly nasty way of selling. It is not quite like the milk the credit card with a fake parcel type of scam. Strange to tell, he's hawking a product that some people actually want, and with, with one sort of wrapper or another, they are buying all over the world.

Nicely played. I'm just disappointed that you didn't manage to sell him ...an overpriced railway ticket! :laugh:

DaisyL Aug 9th, 2011 00:31

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick-H (Post 1239794)
Nicely played. I'm just disappointed that you didn't manage to sell him ...an overpriced railway ticket! :laugh:

:rofl: Good one! That's exactly what I should have done.

capt_mahajan Aug 9th, 2011 00:31

My suggestion to all those who smell a scam is to distance yourself from the assumed scammers as quickly as possible. This is because they might reveal themselves to be violent criminals too.

DaisyL Aug 9th, 2011 00:36

This is good advice. I thought that since I knew what would happen and I wouldn't be parting with money, I could have some fun with it. But, I really didn't know what would happen for sure because I didn't know this person. It's really not a good idea to have fun with scammers. I was lucky because I was able to leave without buying anything, but who knows? If he had been violent, who knows what could have happened? You're right.

Sama Aug 9th, 2011 00:43

geez, what a scam! I'm thinking that Kali's eyes tattooed on my upper arm might hold some back from giving me trouble! :D

last year in Haridwar two pushy shawl salesmen were trying to give me the business, i.e., a run around (AS IF I don't know how to negotiate after all this time), and I lifted my sleeve, pointed to Kali's eyes, and said very seriously, "you don't want to get her angry."

end of discussion.;)


Quote:

Originally Posted by DaisyL (Post 1239747)
I couldn't have paid 150 USD for gems.

what a rip! I was in a good jewelry store in Chennai and paid $10 for a 2.5 caret citrine! it's been appraised here for over 10X that amount.

and capt. is right. one would think after five trips I'd feel more secure than a first-timer, but I still would not go anywhere with anyone who sets off my radar, whether it's inside a store or down a lane. and I have damn good radar.

DaisyL Aug 9th, 2011 00:53

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sama (Post 1239809)
I was in a good jewelry store in Chennai and paid $10 for a 2.5 caret citrine! it's been appraised here for over 10X that amount.

and capt. is right. one would think after five trips I'd feel more secure than a first-timer, but I still would not go anywhere with anyone who sets off my radar, whether it's inside a store or down a lane. and I have damn good radar.

Being in a good jewelry store is the key. You knew that you were getting a genuine gem. I wouldn't know how to tell a real gem from a fake one, so I have no business buying gems from anyone I wouldn't completely trust.

Yes, capt. is right - the minute you smell a scam, you should leave. I didn't, and I really should have. [Blush]

I like your solution to the pushy shawl salesmen! I would never have thought of that. What a great idea!

PeakXV Aug 9th, 2011 01:20

Quote:

Originally Posted by capt_mahajan (Post 1239798)
My suggestion to all those who smell a scam is to distance yourself from the assumed scammers as quickly as possible. This is because they might reveal themselves to be violent criminals too.

It's good in theory & for the seasoned visitor.... but the reality is that the taxi/rickshaw drivers often commandeer/kidnap the unsuspecting, uninitiated newbies towards/into these types. These drivers/operators are in turn allowed to enter rail carriages, unchallenged, for first dibs on new arrivals.

Visits to these scammers &/or over-priced merchants are often the hidden intangible to any fare negotiation.

Until that nasty little cycle of the Indian tourism industry is addressed - the monkeys will continue to romp & roam & undoubtedly profit.

JuliaF Aug 9th, 2011 01:26

Daisy, you tell the story well! :) And I'm so glad you had the strength of character to dismiss all that emotional blackmailing he was trying to put on you.

But the capt is right - while we love stories here it really is better to avoid these situations altogether if possible.

I hope the rest of your travels go well and that you will come back here with some good stories for us. You are one of Indiamike's gems yourself [happy].

DaisyL Aug 9th, 2011 01:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by JuliaF (Post 1239823)
Daisy, you tell the story well! :) And I'm so glad you had the strength of character to dismiss all that emotional blackmailing he was trying to put on you.

But the capt is right - while we love stories here it really is better to avoid these situations altogether if possible.

I hope the rest of your travels go well and that you will come back here with some good stories for us. You are one of Indiamike's gems yourself [happy].

Thanks Julia! :)

Actually, most of the things that happened in India were good. I love India, and I'm dreaming of my next trip there already. I do give talks in my community to tell everyone how wonderful India is and to hopefully get them to thinking of taking a vacation there some day.

It is because of IndiaMike, because others have shared their stories of this scam, that I recognized what was going on. I can't even imagine what my trips to India would have been like without the knowledge I've gained from IM. [shock]

capt_mahajan Aug 9th, 2011 09:02

Quote:

It's good in theory & for the seasoned visitor.
Which is why I said that people who smell the scam should disengage. DaisyL here certainly did smell it, but felt (rightly, as it fortunately turned out), that is was just an attempted scam.

For those who don't smell them- or are willing to leave common sense aside, risks obviously escalate.

PeakXV Aug 9th, 2011 09:42

Quote:

Originally Posted by capt_mahajan (Post 1239934)
Which is why I said that people who smell the scam should disengage. For those who don't, risks escalate.

Sure easy for some, but because it's a 'ring' & in cahoots with the auto & taxi drivers - you often don't have a choice but to, at the very least, meetup & intermingle with these types(violent criminal ?) as you get literally driven/funneled right to their frickin front showroom door. That's bad news.

I've also been taken to the Gem shops while on the way to a destination in Jaipur. "Just five minutes, sir - It's my uncle's shop - just go in and have a friendly cup of tea - it means a lot to me (big friendly smile, head wobble)."

Most newbies will oblige when in 'vacation mode' ... rather than saying no & coming off as an 'unfriendly prick'.


How you discern & handle the situation from that point onwards depends on your Indian experience, street smarts & interpersonal skills.

Some fair much better than others ......

Nick-H Aug 9th, 2011 11:10

Gut feeling doesn't count against a good scammer. It is their job to appeal to your gut feeling!

Experience counts, or (as Daisy says) information taken in from others counts --- but you still have to manage to keep it at the front of your mind while your heart strings are being tugged.

The usual visit-my-uncle's-shop isn't really a scam, anyway. Many travellers are going to buy gifts and souvenirs. Most of these shop visits are not unpleasant, and do not involve more than the usual special-price-just-for-you-because-I-love-your-eyes sort of selling techniques. Most of the shops I was taken to by drivers and guides were actually experiences that I enjoyed. I did not necessarily buy anything: when I did, I didn't really mind that the driver was getting his cut, it all helps to make the world go round.

There's nothing to be worried, or afraid, about the visit-a-shop routine. Just remember that you can say yes or no, and that you don't have to buy.

Daisy's experience moves away from salesmanship and into the area of extortion, but, as I said before, even that is a game some people want to play. All over the world, people are going to dodgy counsellors, practitioners, psychics etc and paying ridiculous prices for their trinkets, charms, jewels potions and bad advice: the more they pay the happier they are. I've seen friends do it, and shaken my head in disbelief at them, but they don't care --- and heard the worst stories from decent and professional members of those trades, who often have to deal with the aftermath and fallout from the unprofessional ones.

brishti Aug 9th, 2011 11:46

stay safe, daisy.
happy journeys - mr khan or not [happy]



:brishti

jituyadav Aug 9th, 2011 12:21

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick-H (Post 1239794)
What a shame you didn't manage to get a photo of him. You could have posted that too!

In place of Shahrukh cool:

DaisyL Aug 9th, 2011 17:38

Quote:

Originally Posted by jituyadav (Post 1240034)
In place of Shahrukh cool:

:laugh: Well, I won't be excited about a photo with my driver....

Thank you brishti, the journey was very happy!

PeakXV Aug 9th, 2011 18:58

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick-H (Post 1239988)

The usual visit-my-uncle's-shop isn't really a scam, anyway. Many travellers are going to buy gifts and souvenirs. Most of these shop visits are not unpleasant, and do not involve more than the usual special-price-just-for-you-because-I-love-your-eyes sort of selling techniques.

Yes & no.

The situation can vary greatly and depends on how forceful/desperate/smooth-talking the auto/taxi drivers are in taking you to these places & the high pressure tactics of the salesmen you are eventually faced with.

It's one thing for two males to get casually dropped off at a shop that has a single, friendly no pressure proprietor & quite another for a single female to get dropped off at an out-of-the-way showroom and suddenly find herself outnumbered 6-1 by professional, hospitable yet increasingly intimidating males.

Both scenarios (& many in between) can easily happen in India - especially @ Jaipur, Agra & Delhi!!!

Harmless buying opportunity, necessary inconvenience, high pressure sales or outright scam attempt ? - it all depends on the chemistry/atmosphere of the parties that are 'brought' together.

One thing is certain - the scammers are experts at picking out who to prey on based on the demeanor & supporting cast (or lack thereof) of the client.

Nick-H Aug 9th, 2011 21:26

yes and yes.

Anyone who can handle a double-glazing salesman or a jehova's witness at the door can handle a rug salesman. And if they fail, they get a rug, and it costs some money.
Quote:

suddenly find herself outnumbered 6-1 by professional, hospitable yet increasingly intimidating males.
Women, generally, are good at that. It is adults I'm talking about!

Anyway, the chances of any tourist not being dragged or persuaded into some shop by almost every driver they encounter, if they don't resist it, are minimal, so it just has to be handled.

PeakXV Aug 9th, 2011 22:51

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick-H (Post 1240398)
yes and yes.

Anyone who can handle a double-glazing salesman or a jehova's witness at the door can handle a rug salesman. And if they fail, they get a rug, and it costs some money.
Women, generally, are good at that. It is adults I'm talking about!



'Your ticket is bogus - we'll need to change it', 'your future is in jeopardy unless you buy this...', do you not like Indians?, 'I need to make a sale to feed my family'. You don't usually get these kind of gambits in western shops.

Unfortunately, it's the more newbie compassionate/naive 'adults' that are most susceptible to these kind of emotional/scare tactics & Jaipur, Delhi & Agra operate these 'games' on a totally different level than the rest of India.

Totally harmless for the majority of us ..... but potentially trip changing & not in a good way for some.

magicmatilda Oct 19th, 2012 17:23

Same Scam - Driver Lucky
 
Hi,

I had to post here, I even registered just to post here on this thread because last night the exact same scam happened to me, thankfully i did not part with my money. Basically I met a rickshaw driver outside my hotel who started talking to me, I politely ignored him but he said he wasn't selling anything and as he wasn't I joined him for chai. I told him about a jeweller my driver had taken me to who read my palm and advised on a gem. A lot of what this "palmist" said was very negative. Lucky (this guy, a rickshaw driver as it turned out) offered to take me to his Guru the next day for an astrology reading. He brought me there and the story is exactly the same as Daisy. Everything he told me is exactly what he told her, exactly, word for word. But he added that I would have trouble conceiveing. Then he offered to make me a pendent for 40000 rupees, yes 40000, as in about 600 Euro. I said this was way above my budget and he offered 5000 for a different, smaller stone. I said no and left. Thankfully when I got back to the hotel I found this thread.

I don't mind the textile stores etc, but to play on someones insecurities like that is going beyond the usual scam. Thankfully I did not fall for it.

Nick-H Oct 19th, 2012 17:34

Zodiac Love

DaisyL Oct 19th, 2012 21:30

Quote:

Originally Posted by magicmatilda (Post 1492004)
Hi,

I had to post here, I even registered just to post here on this thread because last night the exact same scam happened to me, thankfully i did not part with my money. Basically I met a rickshaw driver outside my hotel who started talking to me, I politely ignored him but he said he wasn't selling anything and as he wasn't I joined him for chai. I told him about a jeweller my driver had taken me to who read my palm and advised on a gem. A lot of what this "palmist" said was very negative. Lucky (this guy, a rickshaw driver as it turned out) offered to take me to his Guru the next day for an astrology reading. He brought me there and the story is exactly the same as Daisy. Everything he told me is exactly what he told her, exactly, word for word. But he added that I would have trouble conceiveing. Then he offered to make me a pendent for 40000 rupees, yes 40000, as in about 600 Euro. I said this was way above my budget and he offered 5000 for a different, smaller stone. I said no and left. Thankfully when I got back to the hotel I found this thread.

I don't mind the textile stores etc, but to play on someones insecurities like that is going beyond the usual scam. Thankfully I did not fall for it.

Welcome to IndiaMike, magicmatilda! :)

I am really glad to hear that you didn't fall for the gem scam. Wow, he said the same thing to both of us, except that he told you would have trouble conceiving (unless you buy a gem, of course). I don't think I told guru that I have a daughter, but I did tell Khan. I'm sure that when I was by myself waiting for guru, he was discussing with Khan what I told him.

I wondered how much the gems cost - and wow! Even if I would have wanted a gem, I wouldn't been able to afford one. I wouldn't have even considered the smaller, cheaper one.

I agree with your assessment of this scam - the fact that they are playing on people's emotions and insecurities is what makes this scam so awful. Thanks for naming your rickshaw driver. He's as guilty as the guru is. I'm glad you came on to tell everyone of your experience. I think it's important that people know about this scam so they might not fall for it, even if they are jet lagged or overwhelmed at being in India. Maybe if they are taken to the gem shop to meet guru, they will remember your story and not buy anything. Thanks, magicmatilda!

Nick - great video!! :D

McAlpine Jan 27th, 2013 02:18

The old you need to buy this to clear out the bad juju scam. I had a Fortune Teller in New York try this one. It was crystals you could buy $150 or more depending.

Got to watch the dodgy here. They can get violent. Met a person today that was caught and held against his will. They were trying to get him to pay to go to Kashmir. He escaped them the first time, and on the second time through New Delhi and Pahar Ganj was when they jumped him and held him in a guest house room. He made so much noise they let him go. They kept on acting like he was the one in trouble, and they would get the police.

FYI There are Jaipur Gem Scammers of all sorts all over. I know of one fellow, Ram Sharma, who works Manali in summer, and either Trivandrum or Goa in the winter. Met that one my first trip. They try to act all friendly, and then they ask you for money one way or the other. Just say no. It is the best bet.

DaisyL Jan 27th, 2013 02:36

Quote:

Originally Posted by McAlpine (Post 1537595)
Got to watch the dodgy here. They can get violent. Met a person today that was caught and held against his will. They were trying to get him to pay to go to Kashmir. He escaped them the first time, and on the second time through New Delhi and Pahar Ganj was when they jumped him and held him in a guest house room. He made so much noise they let him go. They kept on acting like he was the one in trouble, and they would get the police.

FYI There are Jaipur Gem Scammers of all sorts all over. I know of one fellow, Ram Sharma, who works Manali in summer, and either Trivandrum or Goa in the winter. Met that one my first trip. They try to act all friendly, and then they ask you for money one way or the other. Just say no. It is the best bet.

Oh my gosh! I'm glad that the person in Delhi you met was able to get away! That is terrible that he was jumped and held against his will. Very scary! [whoa]

Yes, I've heard that gem scammers can be in any city. I think it's good that people share their experiences about them so that tourists heading to any city will know about what to beware of. Just say no - very good advice.

larosca Mar 19th, 2013 00:34

Hey guys!
I'm in Jaipur and went to this man's shop today- Neel Gems. He didn't read my palm much, but we were already interested in looking for an engagement ring... I know people have encountered scam/problems with the "palm read and buy" deal, but Has anybody actually bought anything here? And had it verified at home? I can't figure out if I should trust him or not. We have a small diamond we are interested in, and if he is truthful about the grading etc then the price he is asking for seems accurate with diamonds of similar quality. He said they would make it into a ring for us and we could watch. I can't find any reviews and he let us take the diamond with his boy to the govt gem grading place, but apparently they don't grade them there... They just tell us if it is real or not/synthetic.

Anybody? Thoughts?

nycank Mar 19th, 2013 00:40

Quote:

Originally Posted by larosca (Post 1561827)
Anybody? Thoughts?

You want to buy a ring ? Go to Bridichand Ghanshyamdas on MI Road. They are the TBZ of Jaipur.

dbwright22 Oct 11th, 2013 12:55

Regarding visit-my-uncle's-shop -- One of my best memories of India was visiting an uncle's shop in Jaipur. The kid (he was probably 20) just wanted me to go there because his uncle spoke very good English. And it was a toiletries shop. His very accommodating uncle played translator for a bit, then kid took me on a quick tour of the neighborhood including a nice rooftop view of city.

From my own anecdotal experiences, the more fluent the person is in English (and the more easily you can understand their pronunciation), the more likely it is they are looking to scam you. There are plenty of honest, very fluent anglophones in India, but they are generally less interested in tourists and have no interest in approaching you.

Of course, many young adults can speak very good English, and are eager to practice their language skills with you. So when approached by a curious young adult, my guard would stay up, until perhaps 30 seconds into the conversation, which is about how long it takes to sum up a tout once you've dealt with the first hundred or so you interact with on your first day in India. :woohoo:

Hello Mumbai Sep 15th, 2016 00:30

Hi.

This was very interesting to read.
Similar happened to me. Nothing happened, some questions only but I knew something was wrong from start. Something was not right.

A few years later I read on internet, some blog or here on IM and immediately reminded me of that.
This story included violence and how he was held against his will in a basement. He never mentioned by words but would be same as kidnapping in my country.

Later I never understood why they never went all the way to the end. Pushed more, only thing I can think of is my guesthouse I was staying was side by side, their nearest neighbor. I also asked why do you even trust me/strangers? which I was to them. For some reason they never went all the way, it was years later I was sure and understand something going on then.

Daisy, I usually do as you, playing around. I am a "man", I agree with someone mentioned to avoid. It is "fun" but not just wasting own time but also their. When their time are wasted bad things can happens. If you are a girl / woman avoid. Your and my mistake is probably that we want to see if our "suspicions" is correctly. It is dangerous. A person may looks innocent and suddenly 5 minutes later 10 "friends" standing in front and more difficult to control. Avoid this. Whether you are male or female avoid.

Thanks for a interesting thread.


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