Travel Photography handy checklists and techniques

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#31 Oct 27th, 2014, 19:33
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#31
Quote:
Originally Posted by vaibhav_arora View Post I'd like to hear from someone who has had success photographing objects where the glare is bad such as through glass (at museums) or underwater about their techniques. I have used a CPL with some success in conjunction with a flash but would be great to hear more effective techniques.

- Vaibhav
Thanks VA for adding very important and insightful inputs.

Regarding cutting glare off showcase glass do try the following:-

1. Come very near the glass with wide angle lens.
2. Don't use flash or if you have to then take extreme caution regarding diffusion
3. Tell some one to place a suitably sized black fabric behind you so that glare is minimised.

regards
Somnath
#32 Oct 27th, 2014, 19:46
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#32
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Originally Posted by aheli View Post [B]Give some tips on the position and poses of the photographer's body to make the total system more stable to get stable photos.There are certain postures etc that can minimize shake of camera.


I have one query. I do not have a tripod but I wish to buy one. How much (in Rs.) is enough for a good and cost effective tripod? can you suggest a brand? or should I try a second hand? Till I get one, how can I manage?
I have used top of wall... a piece of brick etc.. but with the fear of damage of my camera.
Thanks Aheli for having a look.

Regarding the position of the body I do the following :

1. Tuck my elbows to the body
2. Support the base of the lens with left hand
3. Try to roll my finger on the shutter button not push
4. The general body position has to be properly locked. If I stand upright try to keep the feet apart. If I have to crouch then I generally kneel on both knees . If I have have to crouch even lower then I sit on my bums. If I have to get to ground level I lye prone on my tummy with elbows supporting the camera.
5. Often just pressing the shutter I exhale slowly and press the shutter just after my lung is emptied :-p

Regarding tripod go for one which claims to support at least 3 times of your heaviest set up. Also never buy unless tried personally. Try to factor in your future upgrade path. Usually the three features of tripod that we seek for i.e. 1.Stability, 2.Portability and 3. Economy , unfortunately all 3 are never ever achieved simultaneously .

A dated but relevant article http://bythom.com/support.htm

cheers
Somnath
#33 Nov 9th, 2014, 12:50
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#33
An article that has made an interesting read

http://www.dslrbodies.com/essays/the...phy-myths.html
#34 Nov 14th, 2014, 13:20
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#34
A few crucial aspects for taking great photos -

1. State of body - one cannot capture good photos or even acceptable photos when one is not physically fit. This is not to suggest that photographers must have gym toned bodies (actually most do not). However, lugging around any weighty camera with a bad back, neck or body pain is going to result in serious compromises when photographing.

2. Equipment balance - Related to the first point is how much load to carry and more importantly, how and where to carry it. I wouldn't want this post to become a long drawn discussion about the right backpack, waist pack or even cotton carriers so suffice to say that if an additional body (camera) or a heavy lens hinders the primary one, it makes little sense to carry it. It is better to work within limitations of your equipment and choose subjects accordingly.

3. State of mind - A person in a happy, relatively carefree state of mind will capture better photographs. Well i suppose the reverse is true as well - capturing good photos makes me happy, I suppose it makes most people happy!
#35 Nov 14th, 2014, 21:28
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#35
I would like to supply proof to substantiate the importance of 'healthy body'. Here for example are the Himalayas, photographed from Mcleodganj - attempted this shot after consumption of apple cider and a long, hard hike that had left me exhausted. Some problems noticed with this photograph include -

1. Lack of focus.
2. Subject obstructed by other objects.
3. Shutter open a bit too long
4. Equipment shake.

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In my defense, I didn't know Himachal apple cider had, erm, alcohol in it.
#36 Nov 14th, 2014, 21:31
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#36
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Originally Posted by vaibhav_arora View Post
3. State of mind - A person in a happy, relatively carefree state of mind will capture better photographs. Well i suppose the reverse is true as well - capturing good photos makes me happy, I suppose it makes most people happy!


Spot on!
#37 Nov 14th, 2014, 21:55
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#37
Quote:
Originally Posted by piyukamath View Post Spot on!
He was in a 'happy' state of mind in the previous post to yours!

Despite being happy he exhibited

1. Lack of focus.
2. Subject obstructed by other objects.
3. Shutter open a bit too long
4. Equipment shake.
#38 Nov 14th, 2014, 22:25
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#38
Oh Vaibhav that picture is so funny!

Is that the only alcohol you've ever had?
#39 Nov 14th, 2014, 22:38
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#39
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Originally Posted by ViShVa View Post He was in a 'happy' state of mind in the previous post to yours!

... And I'm still waiting to know what that bread dish was called!

~~off topic~~
#40 Nov 15th, 2014, 00:29
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#40
Quote:
Originally Posted by vaibhav_arora View Post A few crucial aspects for taking great photos -

1. State of body - one cannot capture good photos or even acceptable photos when one is not physically fit. This is not to suggest that photographers must have gym toned bodies (actually most do not). However, lugging around any weighty camera with a bad back, neck or body pain is going to result in serious compromises when photographing.

2. Equipment balance - Related to the first point is how much load to carry and more importantly, how and where to carry it. I wouldn't want this post to become a long drawn discussion about the right backpack, waist pack or even cotton carriers so suffice to say that if an additional body (camera) or a heavy lens hinders the primary one, it makes little sense to carry it. It is better to work within limitations of your equipment and choose subjects accordingly.

3. State of mind - A person in a happy, relatively carefree state of mind will capture better photographs. Well i suppose the reverse is true as well - capturing good photos makes me happy, I suppose it makes most people happy!
VA you have touched upon some very important and oft-ignored issues here. Let us transcend the closed confines of "checklist and techniques" as the heading itself suggests and get into our experiences and realisations a bit. I share what is coming to my mind, dulled by the long rigours of the day but like all who have passions for photography I just don't bother about such small issues when there is a chance to banter

Yes physical fitness is of prime importance. To be able to move around and as well as to sit still. Just a week back I covered an event where I had to be present about 3 hours before the actual 4 hour long event started. It was so crowded that I could not virtually move an inch here or there. My whole body cramped and I somehow endured but sorely wished that I had maintained better fitness.. The beers and lack of exercise is finally telling and I have to mend ways if I have to keep shooting.

I have realised over the years that you can never shoot landscapes if you don't appreciate the "process of shooting" more than the beauty of nature itself. The nasty early hours, long solitary walks with full blown kits and tripods over rough terrain and finally getting there and you see that the blue hour is coming. Is it more important for you to enjoy the blue hour ? Then you better enjoy it. But to many the actual enjoyment lies in setting the tripod steady, choosing a great foreground, metering the light properly, shooting true and to get that "keeper". I personally have difficulty in minutely remembering many of the great vistas that I have been fortunate to witness but somehow I remember the "process of shooting" much better. I can recollect the camera and lenses used, the filters mounted, what was the f stop etc. with much greater accuracy. Even my wife makes fun of that. Photography does that to you , you start seeing the world through a view finder.

It's madness, it's madness but I don't want to be cured

On a side note I wanted to include "energy bars" as one of the essential items as mentioned in the first post but the editing option is gone. May the Moderators consider the matter and decide according.

Nuff said
Goodnight to all
PLEASE FEEL FREE TO ADD YOUR THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS
#41 Jan 3rd, 2015, 02:49
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#41
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamsomnath View Post ... Regarding the position of the body I do the following :
...

4. The general body position has to be properly locked. If I stand upright try to keep the feet apart. If I have to crouch then I generally kneel on both knees . If I have have to crouch even lower then I sit on my bums. If I have to get to ground level I lye prone on my tummy with elbows supporting the camera.

...

This guy must have read this thread! But very selectively.

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Source lost

But the kid is parallel with the horizon, as advised.
#42 Jan 8th, 2015, 10:09
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#42
All of us who have ventured out to photograph the monuments, parks and similar public places must have felt varying degrees of resistance from the "powers that be" aka the authorities. Ranging from cold stares from the security guys to blanket ban on photography, all seemingly without reason and mostly without any explanation. We are feeling this increasing pressure and often being subject to harsh measures by the authorities. Many of the bans are bordering on being ridiculous. Photographing Howrah bridge is officially off limits. Can you beat that. Now after a long time I see a change towards something good. Though far away in the US , I hope this will somehow stir the babus here. Yes I know, too much to hope for
https://www.congress.gov/bill/113th-...bill/5893/text
#43 Jan 8th, 2015, 11:21
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#43
It is nice to see them name the act after Ansel Adams.

<off topic> Snake River (a perfect travel photograph - click on image in the link to view larger version)

http://pichost.me/1429114/
#44 May 4th, 2015, 10:01
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#44
Just to assure those who always suffer from anxiety if the camera gets wet even a little. At least modern DSLRs , those which are weather sealed ( consult your user manual) take to water like a duck.

I have had the experience of shooting in the rain earlier but last week I had the chance to shoot straight through a day for about 6 straight hours under constant drizzle ( from pitter-patter to really heavy shower). I was using one D610 and a D600 accompanied with 70-200 and 70-300 lenses. No issues. All it took afterwards was some wipe with dry clothes.

Cheers
Somnath
#45 May 4th, 2015, 11:01
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#45
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamsomnath View Post with 70-200 and 70-300 lenses. No issues. All it took afterwards was some wipe with dry clothes.
I had a servo-motor electronics of my 70-300 (A Minolta Lens) stop working after shooting in the Amazonian rain in 2012. It actually depends on the weather details.
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