Super/Ultra/Mega lightweight backpacking

#1 Jan 10th, 2014, 09:55
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#1
I've read quite a few article on ultra lightweight backpacking and i'm not sure if that's lightweight enough.

I'm considering a 27L bookbag or more specifically a Camelbak H.A.W.G. backpack. I've had some experience traveling across the world in the military so smart packing isn't the issue.

Looking for those individuals who've done something similar. Also my planned itinerary is a train trek from somewhere West to hopefully the Darjeeling. Everything in between is up for grabs which is why mobility is the biggest factor.

Thanks
#2 Jan 10th, 2014, 10:14
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#2

Re: super/ultra/mega lightweight backpacking

If possible Please share some neat packing techniques do that space may be used effectively.
Cheers
Somnath goswami
#3 Jan 10th, 2014, 10:38
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#3
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamsomnath View Post If possible Please share some neat packing techniques do that space may be used effectively.

Somnath goswami

the neatest packing-technique is control of one's mind, without which nothing goes, or rather everything goes: hmm, do I need this, and this, and this??

But this is certainly not hard for you, Somnath, as you are a master of the senses, a go-swami!? And at that, the master of the moon even.
#4 Jan 10th, 2014, 11:04
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Re: super/ultra/mega lightweight backpacking

Quote:
Originally Posted by atala View Post the neatest packing-technique is control of one's mind, without which nothing goes, or rather everything goes: hmm, do I need this, and this, and this??

But this is certainly not hard for you, Somnath, as you are a master of the senses, a go-swami!? And at that, the master of the moon even.
Ha ha ha... Yet to realize full potential
#5 Jan 10th, 2014, 11:17
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#5
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamsomnath View Post If possible Please share some neat packing techniques do that space may be used effectively.
Cheers
Somnath goswami
There are hundreds of tips found online ranging from clothes to electronics, but if there's anything that i've learned from crossing country to country is that your load will consistently change based on your environment.

As I've never been to India, my goal here is to assimilate those who have previously done so with a pack similar to what I plan on using.
#6 Jan 10th, 2014, 11:26
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not sure where on im, but there was a post with two links to elaborate spreadsheets as to what to pack. hopefully, you'll stumble across that post.
#7 Jan 10th, 2014, 11:38
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It is different for different people, and different destinations. What you are saying about changing load with change of the country, applies first of all to your journey from home-country to destination. If you leave in winter (and suppose you are alone and not dropped at the airport, or picked up when you return), you need to carry that stuff as well with you. Then within the country of travel, what season are you going to be there, which altitudes are you going to, and other such circumstances.

For me the most relevant point is my tendency to be cold easily, in AC rooms (extremely cold in South East Asia, sometimes in India too) and winter temperatures. Plus I am into health on my long-term trips, so I am carrying items in that regard, as well. In India I would not need mother tinctures, because easily available, but in Thailand they are unknown, so I have to bring some. Relatively small space used, but still. Then also the water-purifier.

An important point is shoes, if you are not average size. Large size shoes are not available in this part of the world, or very hard to locate. So provisions required to prevent an emergency in that field.

Electronics: A notebook (in my case an ultrabook that I take everywhere I go) plus camera, and the inevitable cables.

The clothes are really the smallest and easiest part. The decisive point there is how often you are willing and able to wash them. (Drying in the rainy season is next to impossible at times. So?)

Miscellaneous: Most important: duck-tape. And for me, a mosquito-net.
#8 Jan 10th, 2014, 11:46
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#8
this is the one forum that might have answers
http://www.indiamike.com/india/packi...dia-travel-f6/

check the two suggested readinsgs, and there is one message with 111 posts that might be useful as well.
#9 Jan 10th, 2014, 12:05
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I doubt that leandroid has those lists in mind; they would at best be in the category "not very heavy", or "regular back-pack", but not "ultra-light".
#10 Jan 10th, 2014, 13:58
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#10
Quote:
Originally Posted by atala View Post An important point is shoes, if you are not average size. Large size shoes are not available in this part of the world, or very hard to locate. So provisions required to prevent an emergency in that field.

Electronics: A notebook (in my case an ultrabook that I take everywhere I go) plus camera, and the inevitable cables.

The clothes are really the smallest and easiest part. The decisive point there is how often you are willing and able to wash them. (Drying in the rainy season is next to impossible at times. So?)

Miscellaneous: Most important: duck-tape. And for me, a mosquito-net.
I love travelling with a carry-on sized bag or daypack only. When I'm travelling for only a couple of weeks I don't pack extra shoes, or I wear the shoes while travelling and pack sandals at most.

Nowadays a smart phone can replace both a computer and a camera if you don't mind the limitations. It really helps a lot in lightening the load, both literally and mentally.

Funny about the mosquito net. I have been to other parts of India but have almost never wished for a mosquito net. Especially definitely never in cities. Most rooms have a flat cement ceiling with a fan that I run, so what do you attach the net to? I can't picture it. I have never carried one and never missed it, but have also not gone to rural areas during monsoon.

Oh -- in India you get handy little single-dose packets of laundry powder or shampoo, so there's no need to carry those from home or to carry a whole bottle of shampoo. So no risk of leakage.

Without warm clothes, a mozzie net, shampoo bottles, computer and camera, you can get by with a bag the size of carry-on luggage (though you have to check it in if you've got a single knife or metal thing).
#11 Jan 10th, 2014, 14:17
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#11
When you travel will have some bearing on what you pack. Darjeeling gets cold in winter.

Are you aware that the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway is broken in the middle for the forseeable future?
#12 Jan 10th, 2014, 17:13
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Originally Posted by NonIndianResident View Post I love travelling with a carry-on sized bag or daypack only. When I'm travelling for only a couple of weeks I don't pack extra shoes, or I wear the shoes while travelling and pack sandals at most.

Nowadays a smart phone can replace both a computer and a camera if you don't mind the limitations. It really helps a lot in lightening the load, both literally and mentally.

Funny about the mosquito net. I have been to other parts of India but have almost never wished for a mosquito net. Especially definitely never in cities. Most rooms have a flat cement ceiling with a fan that I run, so what do you attach the net to? I can't picture it. I have never carried one and never missed it, but have also not gone to rural areas during monsoon.

Oh -- in India you get handy little single-dose packets of laundry powder or shampoo, so there's no need to carry those from home or to carry a whole bottle of shampoo. So no risk of leakage.

Without warm clothes, a mozzie net, shampoo bottles, computer and camera, you can get by with a bag the size of carry-on luggage (though you have to check it in if you've got a single knife or metal thing).
I am using a carry-on bag as well (from Tatonka), expandable though, as my main piece of luggage, and a small daypack for PC and camera. I am using a protection bag over my carry-on-main bag for plane travel. Into that protection bag come additional items like mozzie-net and my extra pair of shoes/birkenstocks.

The main difference with you and me is, I think, that I am always long term travelling, at least 5 months away from home; I carry a lot that I will never use, which I carry only for emergency, like the mozzie-net which I don't use that often. I only use box-type nets, as you also get in India. I never use a fan at night, as I tend to catch a cold from the air moving always. So there are more places for me to use a net (contradictory to above, I know; but I can't sleep with even only 1 mossie bothering me). And I don't spray poisons on my body, like Deet and stuff.

An emergency item that I have added to my list is Shoe Goo. It is the ultimate repair glue for almost anything, esp shoes. Fortunately skate borders use it a lot too, so it's available in such stores. And there is an automotive kind as well, so it's widely used.

Hmm, i could not do without an ultrabook (for writing jobs especially, and storage for fotos, plus films for entertainment, and for me: dhamma-talks by Buddhist monks). It is ultrathin and no problem to carry around in my day-bag. But I can see that a smartphone would be good enough for less involved travel. My bridge type camera is a headache. It takes too much space for as little as i use it. I planned to buy a Sony RX 200, but it was a bit too expensive still when I left. A small high-capacity camera like that is on my list though.

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