Numerical Classifiers in Bengali

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#1 Jul 5th, 2014, 12:46
It's all Greek to me, but Benglish will do
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#1
A have a query regarding classifiers added to numbers in Bengali.

The famous film by Satyajit Ray "Teen Kanya" তিন কন্যা does not add any classifier to the number three in the title "Three Daughters".

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Yet, in everyday usage we say "teente meye" তিনটে মেয়ে for "three girls", and the addition of -te টে is mandatory.

Is it because the noun 'kanya' comes from Sanskrit?

Is it because it is a film title?

Can anyone help me to understand this?
#2 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:06
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#2
The reason is 'divergence' or 'Bibhokti' as we call in Bengali.
Both Hindi and Bengali inherits a lot from Sanskrit, yet they do differ a lot at translational levels to denote grammatical relations.

A close example from English would be:

Five people
Fifth person
#3 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:10
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#3
The difference is in personal choice -- teen kanya is 'three girls', tin-Te meye is 'the three girls'

next, 'kanya' is a more conservative usage, whereas 'meye' is colloquial ... it could as easily have been tinTe kanya and tin meye ... please do not take it so seriously
Trust not the man that does not drink ... he will remember next morning what the rest of us said last night.
#4 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:11
It's all Greek to me, but Benglish will do
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#4
Butů. Bengali grammar is a very serious matter.


#5 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:11
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#5
Beg to differ Mr Dipyamanbasu --- tinte meye is not the equivalent of the 'third girl' ... cheers
#6 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:16
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#6
Quote:
Originally Posted by theyyamdancer View Post A have a query regarding classifiers added to numbers in Bengali.

The famous film by Satyajit Ray "Teen Kanya" তিন কন্যা does not add any classifier to the number three in the title "Three Daughters".

Attachment 59082

Yet, in everyday usage we say "teente meye" তিনটে মেয়ে for "three girls", and the addition of -te টে is mandatory.

Is it because the noun 'kanya' comes from Sanskrit?

Is it because it is a film title?

Can anyone help me to understand this?
Hi TD,

What a question .. Mind blowing .. Never thought of it ..

Anyway I'm trying to answer ..

When ever We are saying " Teen-te Meye " ("Three Girls") , there might not be any affinity among them .. Like when we say : " Teen-te Meye Delhi Jachche" ( Three Girls are going to Delhi) , they may be Three Different Girls without any CLOSE Relation Among them.

But when there is CLOSE Relation OR Affinity among them , We omit " Te / Ti" . Like : " Amar Teen meye " ( I've Three Daughters) . OR when we say " Teen Bondhu Cinema dekhte jachche " (Three Friends are Going to see a Movie" ) .. In this case also we omit " Ti /te " .

I think there is an inherit relation among the three Women of " TEEN KANYA" by Ray. They represent Childhood , Teenage & the young ages respectively ( & the 3 stories "Monihara", "Postmaster " & "Samapti" are also written by Same writer, Tagore. ) So Ray Used "TEEN KANYA" instead of " TEEN-te KANYA"..
#7 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:18
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#7
Thanks everybody. It is very enlightening !

[I will probably be back with more questions like this….]
#8 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:21
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#8
Quote:
Originally Posted by theyyamdancer View Post Thanks everybody. It is very enlightening !

[I will probably be back with more questions like this….]
You are always welcome, TD !
#9 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:26
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#9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lone Yeti View Post Beg to differ Mr Dipyamanbasu --- tinte meye is not the equivalent of the 'third girl' ... cheers
I never said it was equivalent but had no other option to denote a similarity in English language.
#10 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:30
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#10
Sorry Mr. Ghosh, but I would beg to differ with you here.

We can say that this chair has 4 legs and this is a 4 legged chair.

Nowhere does this imply any close affinity between the 4 legs of the chair.
#11 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:39
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#11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lone Yeti View Post The difference is in personal choice -- teen kanya is 'three girls', tin-Te meye is 'the three girls'

next, 'kanya' is a more conservative usage, whereas 'meye' is colloquial ... it could as easily have been tinTe kanya and tin meye ... please do not take it so seriously

meye tin-Te - the three girls

BUT

tin-Te meye - three girls



Look at this example:

jodi duTo chhattro ashe, ami parabo - If two students come, I will teach

BUT

jodi chhattro duTo ashe, ami parabo - If the two students come, I will teach
#12 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:40
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#12
Ms theyyamdancer, I looked for the 'like' button below your comment above but could not find it ...
#13 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:40
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#13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dipyamanbasu View Post Sorry Mr. Ghosh, but I would beg to differ with you here.

We can say that this chair has 4 legs and this is a 4 legged chair.

Nowhere does this imply any close affinity between the 4 legs of the chair.
Yeah .. Dipyaman .. You have every right to differ .. But There is a clear affinity , 4 Legs of the "Same Chair " ..

& one request : Please Do not call me " Mr." Only "Arupratan" will be nice !
#14 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:41
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#14
X-posting

It has bhanished.
#15 Jul 5th, 2014, 13:45
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#15
Now you are speaking like Yoda.

The example given by you needs to be differentiated on the basis of which one sounds more appeasing to the ears.

Ami Porikhkha-te prothom howechi.
Ami Porikhkha-e prothom howechi.

Both can be translated to the same sentence in English.

I stood first in the examination.
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