Hindi proverb - meaning? - jiski laathi tiski bhains

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#1 May 31st, 2013, 11:29
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#1
Hello IM

I recently came across a proverb "jiski laathi tiski bhains". I belive that translates literally into something like "who holds the stick owns the ox". What is the proverbial meaning? The powerful gets his way? Or something else?

Thanks in anticipation

Miguel
#2 May 31st, 2013, 11:51
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Yes - That is right. Similar to "might is right"
#3 May 31st, 2013, 12:11
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Hindi proverb - meaning? - jiski laathi tiski bhains

Thank you!
Would you know of maybe any proverb-dictionaries? Hindi-english and or vice versa?
#4 May 31st, 2013, 12:35
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I think the proverb is "Jiski Lathi Uski Bhains", the one who is powerful gets every thing.

You have some translations in http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Hindi_proverbs and http://www.indif.com/kids/hindi_prov..._proverbs.aspx.
#5 Jun 15th, 2013, 14:32
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Hindi proverb - meaning? - jiski laathi tiski bhains

Quote:
Originally Posted by aarosh View Post I think the proverb is "Jiski Lathi Uski Bhains", the one who is powerful gets every thing.

You have some translations in http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Hindi_proverbs and http://www.indif.com/kids/hindi_prov..._proverbs.aspx.
Do you know of any books (Hindi <> English) on such proverbs? I am well stocked on grammar books, but this sort of book is missing still
#6 Jun 15th, 2013, 14:37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mchp92 View Post Do you know of any books (Hindi <> English) on such proverbs? I am well stocked on grammar books, but this sort of book is missing still
Sorry, no. I will update this thread if I have any information.
#7 Jul 15th, 2013, 16:50
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Mod Note
This thread has been moved to the newly created "Languages in India" forum.
#8 Jul 15th, 2013, 19:17
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Hi,

Some years ago I bought in Hindi book center (Asaf Ali road) this book from बदरीनाथ कपूर : हिन्दी मुहावरे और लोकोक्ति कोश Maybe you can order it ? This is uni-lingual dictionary.

I have photocopies of a very old and small (26 pages) dictionary but I don't remember the title (so, problems of copyright maybe ?) and I don't know if I can put 26 photos on Indiamike.
#9 Jul 16th, 2013, 02:39
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#10 Jul 16th, 2013, 12:01
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Answer to mchp92 (May 31st, 2013, 11:29)

In my dictionary (बदरीनाथ कपूर : हिन्दी मुहावरे और लोकोक्ति कोश) I found this meaning in Hindi : किसी बलवान द्वारा किसी कमज़ोर की वस्तु हथिया लेना | (kisii balavaan dvaaraa kisii kamazor kii vastu hathiyaa lenaa). But I am not sure to be able to translate it correctly. So, if somebody can do it, thanks a lot.
#11 Jul 16th, 2013, 14:19
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Quote:
किसी बलवान द्वारा किसी कमज़ोर की वस्तु हथिया लेना |
it means "someone powerful/strong is taking something by force from someone who is weak". not word for word, because of that pesky thing called grammar.
#12 Jul 22nd, 2013, 17:22
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#12

Five by five - 20130722

There were 448 proverbs in an old book somebody lent me some years ago. If everybody agree I want to "give" them to you, five by five, with my translation between parenthesis (I try to understand... don't laugh, please, not so loudly, please).

1. नौ नक़द न तेरह उधार | nau nakad na terah udhaar (nine (in) cash, not thirteen (in) loan) - A bird in hand is worth two in the bush.

2. अँधा क्या जाने बसंत की बहार | andhaa kyaa jaane basant kii bahaar (what a blind man knows about the beauty of spring) A blind man is no judge of colours.

3. सस्ता रोवे बार-बार, मंहगा रोवे एक बार | sastaa rove baar-baar, manhagaa rove ek baar (cheap cries repeatedly, expensive cries once) A cheap buyer takes bad meat. I found मँहगा instead of महँगा in another book - Bhargavas Standar Illustrated DICTIONARY Hindi-English - Compiled by Prof. R. C; PATHAK -B.A.LT.

4. कुत्ते को घी हज़म नहीँ होता | kutte ko ghii hazam nahiin hotaa (a dog can not digest clarified butter) - A low-born man feels proud of new honours.

5. नक्कार खाने में तूती की कौन सुनता है | nakkaar khane me tuutii kii kaun sunataa hai (where a kettledrum is played who can hear a canary bird) A poor man's voice is never heard against the rich. I am not sure we have to write in one word : नक्कारखाने instead of नक्कार खाने.

@adam00121, thanks for your answer.
Last edited by bitchou; Jul 22nd, 2013 at 17:25.. Reason: Thanks to adam00121
#13 Jul 22nd, 2013, 18:08
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#13
Quote:
Originally Posted by bitchou View Post I found मँहगा instead of महँगा in another book - Bhargavas Standard Illustrated DICTIONARY Hindi-English - Compiled by Prof. R. C; PATHAK -B.A.LT.
It's most probably a simple typo but it could also reflect the (non-standard) pronunciation of the type-setter. After all people born and brought up in Delhi pronounce नहीँ as if it were "नँई".

Quote:
4. कुत्ते को घी हज़म नहीँ होता | kutte ko ghii hazam nahiin hotaa (a dog can not digest clarified butter) - A low-born man feels proud of new honours.
I always associate this proverb with the following verse from the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 7.6, King James Bible)
Quote:
Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast
ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them
under their feet, and turn again and rend you.

Quote:
5. नक्कार खाने में तूती की कौन सुनता है | nakkaar khane me tuutii kii kaun sunataa hai (where a kettledrum is played who can hear a canary bird) A poor man's voice is never heard against the rich. I am not sure we have to write in one word : नक्कारखाने instead of नक्कार खाने.
One word. Otherwise it could be misunderstood as "Who can hear a canary while eating a kettle-drum".
#14 Jul 22nd, 2013, 18:25
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#14

Who can hear a canary while eating a kettle-drum

It is clear.

Thanks Golghar.

I forgot the link about "pipkin" : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipkin
#15 Jul 22nd, 2013, 19:30
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#15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bitchou View Post I forgot the link about "pipkin" : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipkin
Sorry, I am completely at a loss. Did anyone refer to a "pipkin"? the equivalent term in Hindi would be बटलोई (batloi).
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