Leh/Ladakh in 5 days or less

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#1 Apr 11th, 2012, 17:51
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#1
Recently I see a lot of queries and itineraries which want to accomplish Leh, Pangong tso, Nubra and every other monastery in the region in 5 or lesser days. Just thought this might be a thread where such people can be referred to instead of giving them the same responses.

There can be 2 options to reach Leh
  1. By air
  2. By road

1. By air if you plan to do the usual hotspots in 5 days then you might be able to do some of the places
  • Day 1 Reach Leh - Acclimatize, visit shanti stupa and get permits
  • Day 2 Around Leh - Leh palace (which is not really interesting as per me, but then that is me) OR drive to magnetic hill and drass war memorial
  • Day 3 Go to Nubra (And I would request experts to correct me here), This can be tricky as you might not be acclimatized. Read the AMS thread and know the risks. Stay in Diskit or Hunder
  • Day 4 Back To leh.
  • Day 5 - Hemis and other Monasteries and back to Leh
OR
  1. Day 1 and 2 same as above
  2. Day 3 Hemis and other Monasteries
  3. Day 4 Pangong Tso and night halt (Know AMS and the risks, This can be really risky and I am sure other IMers will find this day risky and a bad suggestion by me)
  4. Day 5 Back to leh
2. By Road - If you plan to have a trip from Delhi or manali and want to finish it in 5 days then the best bet is to forget the trip and plan something else.
If you have 5 days in Leh then do something as suggested above.

Note - Keep 2 days for travel from Manali/Srinagar to and fro from Leh. A total of 4 days. (this will reduce your acclimitazation days to some extent)


For the newlyweds who are planning a romantic + adventurous + trip to Leh - Why not evaluate some other options before thinking about this place which you can do later in your life.
Coz
  • You don’t want to be sick with AMS on your honeymoon
  • You don’t want motion sickness to ruin your honeymoon
  • You might not find the cold desert romantic as it appears in the movies or in the pictures. Ladakh is beautiful but it is also tough and harsh. It is a dessert. It is a long days drive to reach pangong tso. And the lake is a cold salt water lake. Just so you know.


Overall the entire concept of doing ladakh in 5 days might not be accepted by me or many others on IM.


But I thought this thread is essential as I am tired explaining the same things to every new IMer who JUST wants to see everything in Ladakh in his few (difficult to get) leaves.

Getting leaves is tough these days but then that is no justification in trying to cover ladakh in that short period. You might end up only travelling, and missing out the real charm of ladakh.
Understand that this is one of the places that needs time. If you do not have time then better not try to do this. If you cannot extend leaves do not plan to see everything, limit yourself to see only what can be done in those number of days and go back to your life.

The Himalayas will call you soon. Trust me They will (I am still trying to figure out when do I go back)

Fellow IMers please add in if I am missing on something.

Important Points -
  • Leh - Pangong Tso - Leh in a day - If this is what you plan in your ittinerary due to shortage of days then please do not think about it. In my opinion it is not about if this is possible or not, it simply is not worth it period.
  • Leh-Khardung la-Leh in a day due to less days in hand- Yes you will reach the highest motorable road (disputed with marsmikla) but then is it all you want to achieve and miss the beautiful nubra valley? Can this be done in a day? Again yes this can be done in a day but definetly not worth it. This needs a minimum of 2 days to start from leh and spend a night in nubra and back to leh on day 2. period

Please read the entire thread before posting a question, most of the questions to bargain the entire ladakh in those few leaves have been discussed and answered.
Bike rides - Kashmir to Leh and Sikkim, Jungle safaris - Corbett,Chikhaldara, Kanha and Gorumara. Traveled through MP, Himachal, J&K, Maharashtra, W.Bengal, Sikkim, Uttarakhand, Goa, Karnataka, AP . . . Yet feel so New to traveling in India.
Last edited by JuliaF; Jun 4th, 2012 at 14:51.. Reason: added info at new_traveller's request
#2 Apr 11th, 2012, 19:03
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#2
That was well put !! Hopefully people would come up with realistic itineraries now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by new_traveller View Post [*]Day 2 Around Leh - Leh palace (which is not really interesting as per me, but then that is me), drive to magnetic hill, drive to drass war memorial.
I'm slightly confused about your comment on driving to Drass war memorial on day 2. My understanding is Drass is too far a hike from Leh for a day trip. Or am I missing something here?
Regards
Supratik
#3 Apr 11th, 2012, 19:07
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supra View Post That was well put !! Hopefully people would come up with realistic itineraries now.



I'm slightly confused about your comment on driving to Drass war memorial on day 2. My understanding is Drass is too far a hike from Leh for a day trip. Or am I missing something here?
Regards
Supratik
I did not mean hike. I meant a drive. I will update the post so it gets clear. Drass should again be a marathon ride.
#4 Apr 12th, 2012, 03:51
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#4
Beat me to it NT, I have a draft of the same post somewhere on a discarded laptop
Moderators,
Can we elevate this to a sticky. Better still can we forbid entry to the forum to anyone unless they swear on a stack of holy books that they have read it? its in the nature of sites like this that no-one browses enough and posts that same old query instead to save time(Guilty, Your Honour) But I am as bored as NT above of gently discouraging honeymooners from spending the first days of marriage throwing up and cursing the loved one who suggested this crazy idea etc etc. '3 Idiots' has a lot to answer for.

I would go further and say that only those who can afford 2 weeks should consider it. If you then allow 2-3 days eating cakes and slurping tea and only then consider a few Gompas, palaces etc then you will have a reasonable chance of enjoying it. Every year I see the same Indian couples wheezing miserably on the holiday of a lifetime. Us foreigners are so paranoid about the mystic orient that we keep our nose glued to a guidebook and so have a lower incidence of ignorance about AMS, but we are not exempt.
Local Ladakhis despair even more than I do - many invest a lot of time and money on clients who give up on day 3 or, just as bad quarrel over refunds when the problems would never have arisen if they had read the posts on the forum.
#5 Apr 24th, 2012, 00:27
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I just found the draft for this, discarded last year as a bit cheeky and opinionated given that I am a foreigner but as New Traveller has broken the ground and this is now a sticky I thought it was worth adding.
“THE IDEAL LADAKH ITINERARY.”
Fly in if you can afford it as opposed to driving via Manali. Driving via Srinagar is fine. By all means consider bus/taxi out. Read the threads on this for a more detailed discussion.
Recent horror stories from last year
1/ The Asian Paints corporate outing – day 1 leh, day 2 up the Khardung La, day 2 ― several delegates unconscious and hospitalised.
2/ The consultant neurologist who went to Pangong on the 2nd day and came back with HAPE. As the Doctor who treated him said ’ he should have known better.....’
3/ Naive tourist to taxi driver ‘what happens if i just go to Pangong anyway on my second day here?. Responsible taxi driver – ‘You die’
All the above come from first hand accounts and I must have had at least one similar instance myself every time I visit.
The above could all have been avoided with a bit of research on this site or the purchase of a good guidebook. Some of the Indian guidebooks i have seen are sadly deficient.
‘Reach Ladakh’ makes no mention of hydration levels, rest days etc and seems to equate AMS with a common cold. No mention of ascent rates and they seem to think that Lake Pangong at 4200 is OK for an overnight stop on day 3
Manmohan Singh Bawa’s trekking book is even worse advocating a 700 meter rate of ascent as OK. Although I tip my hat to his overall knowledge of Himalayan trails, he has done a lot more than I have, this is dangerous to the uninitiated – yes I have done it, no I don’t ever want to do it again.
The Trailblazer Guide ‘Trekking in Ladakh’ by Charlie Loram is out of date but far better, the Lonely Planet Guide is not so good but has good safety info. However for an Indian reader on a budget the books are not necessarily available and are darn expensive, never mind being aimed at a different market. If you are a Indian family group then backpacker info is often superfluous, but it means you miss the vital stuff.
Try it this way:
Day one.
Arrive Leh.Go to guesthouse. Order a lot of tea. Read a book. Practise going upstairs, wheeze and wonder why you volunteered for this. Back to the tea and book. Repeat for the rest of the day. I am serious. You can go out for dinner in the evening if you are good.
Day 2. Try the market and town gompa or if fit trek up to the palace. If you cannot do this easily how are you going to cope with trekking?. (Actually easily if you follow the advice below, but it should bring it home to you......) Back to that tea and book in the afternoon.
Day 3. Now you can do the Indus valley gompas/Shey Palace or you can repeat Day 2. After all you are on holiday. Chill. Turn the phone off.
Day 4. Notice how lake Pangong has not made an appearance yet. It won’t today either. Possibly Lamayuru and or Alchi if you feel up to a lot of time in a taxi, although you may be getting gompa’d out if you followed Day 2. Try Phyang gompa instead. If trekking it’s OK to start now
Pangong is always a risk to stay overnight from a start at Leh – its 4200 meters, you would be better off spending a night at 4000. But.......pity there is not much between Leh and Pangong. Consider something else.
Day 5. OK you can go to Pangong if you must.................Notice how much time this is taking? You are now acclimatised and can consider sleeping at 4000 metres – 4200 is still a risk. If trekking don’t try to shave a day off to fit a timetable- -it will generally end in tears. Markha takes 6-9 days depending on whether you do both passes.
Day 6. Sorry, You cant go to Tso Moriri and stay the night. Not at 4600+ from a start at 3500 in Leh. Either its too far from Pangong or its too high to sleep coming from Leh. A day trip if you must – but its so much better to walk there......its only a week........That said I have seen posts from heros who have taxi’d from Pangong to Chushul and then Mahe and Tso Moriri, I just wouldn’t risk the wear and tear on the backside.
1/ If you cant spend 2 weeks seriously consider somewhere else. Ladakh is not easily constrained into a week’s break. Your boss/your clients/your in-laws minding the kids while you try to recapture that honeymoon spirit may not allow you this much time, in which case consider HP/Uttaranchal/ Kashmir. Their photos are right, its God’s own country (Ok, so Kerala has first call on that phrase but mountain folks will differ...). Given that you need 2-3 days to acclimatise in Leh before doing anything, you are behind before you start. 2 weeks are cool, but 10 days are problematic given the travel time from Bengaluru/Delhi/Kolkata to Leh. If you really can only do 10 days then resign yourself to sticking to the Indus valley and perhaps a drive back via Manali
2/ read the AMS threads. Now.
Well done.
Do it again.
Especially if you are the one doing the research for others. Your spouse/kids/trekking buddies will remember your advice when they are throwing up at 4200 meters and remonstrate violently when they get well enough to do so.
3/ Go back to point 1/ If you cannot keep within the guidelines on altitude revise the schedule until you can. Don’t cram it, you will regret it.
The 2-3 days acclimatisation at 3500m is not negotiable. Leaving aside the fact that you wont actually want to do much anyway, remember that if one of you is ill, the rest cannot do much either. For the honeymooners amongst you: imagine a loved one vomiting in the taxi 100 miles from nowhere. Do you go on or go home........? She will remember your decision..............on every wedding anniversary.
So forget about ‘Can we go to Pangong on day 2 enquiries’. At my regular guesthouse the Ladakhi Dr. who is the daughter of the house reckons that 30% of her domestic guests get AMS symptoms thanks to this syndrome.
3/ Avoid the ‘If this is Tuesday it must be Thikse’ approach. Opinions differ as to how much vacation time can be spent in a taxi but according to some enquiries it seems to be 90%. Although the US side of my family wouldn’t find this strange, I am puzzled by such a whistle stop tour; anywhere in India is worth a lot more than this, Ladakh especially so.
4/Alcohol. Look on this as a golden opportunity to rest the liver. Booze hits twice as hard and as efficiently at altitude. An Old Monk/God father Super Strength high altitude hangover is not in fact a terminal illness. It just feels like it. Trust me. After he spent an evening at a chang fuelled Ladakhi christening, I seriously considered shooting a friend as an act of mercy.
5/ Diamox. Not a substitute for slow ascent. Ladakhi mates gleefully recount the tales of hospitalised tour groups who got off the plane, popped a few pills, felt bulletproof and started up the Khardung La. Personally, I personally swear by it but only if I follow the altitude guidelines - much better sleep, but never follow the advice of a bloke like me who recommends it on a website..............Read up about it properly and then see your Dr and only take it following their advice.
6/ Trekking. If you cannot walk for 4-6 hours at sea-level you won’t manage at altitude. Get the boots and go to the gym, Better still go to the gym and only then consider getting the boots.
6/ Water. Opinions differ as to the amount but you will need a lot more than usual (see vistet’s posts for a contrary view to mine.) I often wonder if Indian tourists need less than foreigners who are not used to 30 degree heat but us Europeans need 3 +litres a day. In either case remember that Ladakh in summer is a tandoor not a teej-time swamp so it will still boil out of you wherever you come from.
Trekking
In general order of difficulty, well established treks to consider are:
1/Shyam – north of the Indus – easy
2/ Matho – a couple of higher passes
3/ Markha – classic but higher
4/ Rumtse-Rupshu – Tso Moriri - higher and more lonesome
5/ Zanskar – tough.
6/ Ladakh range – brilliant off-piste stuff but decidedly difficult.
Take it slow and come back often.
#6 Apr 24th, 2012, 09:09
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Quote:
Originally Posted by captain bruce View Post Recent horror stories from last year
1/ The Asian Paints corporate outing – day 1 leh, day 2 up the Khardung La, day 2 ― several delegates unconscious and hospitalised.
2/ The consultant neurologist who went to Pangong on the 2nd day and came back with HAPE. As the Doctor who treated him said ’ he should have known better.....’
3/ Naive tourist to taxi driver ‘what happens if i just go to Pangong anyway on my second day here?. Responsible taxi driver – ‘You die’
All the above come from first hand accounts and I must have had at least one similar instance myself every time I visit.
The above could all have been avoided with a bit of research on this site or the purchase of a good guidebook.
Capt Bruce - A great write up. Let me also add 1 incident I witnessed and 1 which a close friend of mine who helped me plan my trip witnessed.

1- I have narrated this on some other posts but thought might make sense in less than 5 days as this is a perfect example of climbing too fast in too little time AND ignorance.

After a tiring ride to pangong tso and watching the sunset we heard some commotion in the nearby tent. (Not argument, but definitely panicky loud voices). I got out of my tent and saw a couple of guys having an argument with the kid who helps you at a tent.
Me and my friend walked up to them and on discussion found that, they were a group of around 8 friends from Hyderabad. They had flown to Leh the day before, did the around leh stuff and were now at Pangong Tso.
The commotion was because they wanted to know of the nearest first aid station or a doctor. The reason - They had in their tent an ailing friend, who was feeling his heart was choked up. Clueless as they were, I explained (what little I understand) on AMS and inquired who was the smarty who designed their itinerary? It came out that they did not have too much time and the travel agency had planned their tour.
Gave them diamox and instructed them to deal with the patient. Also suggested them to go back to leh early in the morning. All I saw was a group of busy professionals who did not have time or incline to do the homework about the place. Who also did not have enough days (<=5) to acclimatized.

They did accept(reluctantly), it is tiring and they are not enjoying the whole ladakh tour.

2 - This friend of mine went to leh (stayed for a couple of days) and rented some bikes and drove to Pangong tso. A smart friend of his decided it was time enjoy life with a drink.
I am not sure how much he drank. Nor do I know if it was AMS OR alcohol OR a combination of both. But he had to be rushed to the military hospital and required oxygen the entire night. My friend luckily did not spend the night getting an earful from the jawans. They were helpful and jovial (guess they see such incidences often).

I cannot do a causal analysis nor want it to be done, coz the fact remains careless behavior and ignorance towards AMS may end you in a hospital if you are lucky to find a hospital.
#7 Apr 28th, 2012, 22:00
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Quote:
Originally Posted by captain bruce View Post Recent horror stories from last year
1/ The Asian Paints corporate outing – day 1 leh, day 2 up the Khardung La, day 2 ― several delegates unconscious and hospitalised.
Classic mechanism at work it seems , none of the survivors complain.



I have carried a fellow traveller out of the vehicle in Pang , twice. First person tried to convince himself afterwards he suffered from a bad tummy (which would explain the projectile vomiting , but not the massive ataxia or going unconscious ... ) , and I doubt second one has shared her story either. Unfortunately bad news donīt travel fast or wide.

Lots of good stuff here already , my points for those short on time would be :

* Manali-Leh : donīt. Even with good planning , which fairly often donīt pan out. Iīve made two unplanned stops in Pang , coming from the Manali end over the years and this far from unique. Always plan a buffer day , which probably wonīt work out well on a tight schedule.

* Srinagar-Leh is a lot better than flying in - if it involves a night in Kargil , the cannonball run is only marginally better than flying in. And no fun.

* First or second night is best spent lower than Leh : Alchi is my preference , four hundred meters lower.

* Stay within guide lines - but thatīs already out after a fly in , so go with the medical consensus and use Diamox from the start , 24 hours before flying in. Yes , you should see a doc for this, as with all other medication.

* All drugs come with some levels of side effects and interaction , including "natural" preparations. Preparations that can affect bleeding/coagulation balance ( apart from the effect of altitude ) include gingko and ibuprofen , that recently has been proposed as a AMS preventive medication. Discuss all medication with a doc , so you donīt end up with several minor factors resulting in a very bad cocktail.

* Staying below 5000 at all times first two days is a good safe play. After that , as long as everyone are ok from the start , see Nubra as another good option to spend a night lower than than Leh.

Quote:
Originally Posted by captain bruce View Post ‘Reach Ladakh’ makes no mention of hydration levels..
Which makes me mostly relieved , seeing how this theme is interpreted most of the time , starting with equating hydration with water only , as opposed to to fluids. In practical terms we probably would mostly agree on a trek , but blanket recommendations in this context , for people who will spend most of their day in vehicle , never shouldering a pack - why should someone need to go beyond for example the advice covering Pheriche ( 4300-ish ) to trekkers by the Himalayan Rescue Association , "around three liters a day" ?
Key points : donīt get dehydrated, high fluid intake has no proven effect against AMS , and ( like practically all substances, including oxygen ) water is toxic in high enough doses :

Quote:
In reality you only need an additional liter to a liter and a half of water at altitude. Too much water is harmful and can dilute your body's sodium levels (hyponatremia) causing weakness, confusion, seizures, and coma.
( Source : IFAM - Himalayan Rescue Association also warns against hyponatremia )

On the anecdotal level : see my blog for the details of the Norwegian trekker that didnīt improve after being carried down several hundred meters , didnīt improve after a night in the Gamow Bag , or after being flown down to Kathmandu - where the answer came with the first electrolyte test : water , not altitude sickness. On the speculative side the son of Ang Rita , a Sherpa with ten succesful climbs of Everest died at EBC about a week ago . This was problematic to read :

Quote:
Karsang..was out and about in Base Camp when he began complaining of a dry throat. His brother-in-law took him to his own camp, where Karsang drank several bottles of water. While people tried to help him walk back to the Prestige camp, Karsang collapsed and couldn't be revived.
Last edited by vistet; Apr 29th, 2012 at 01:26.. Reason: Buffer day comment
#8 Apr 28th, 2012, 23:09
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only point I would add about fluid intake is that as the symptoms of dehyration and early AMS blend a bit then swallowing 1/2 litre and waiting 1/2 hour will rule out AMS when you are worried about headache/lassitude - that is, if you feel better its dehydration, if you dont.................Following the rule that your pee should look like gin not creme de menthe should suffice
#9 Apr 29th, 2012, 01:22
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Agree on the first point , rule out dehydration first. Not on the second one , drink until the urine looks like during a pub crawl. This is what Iīd expect to see from the example already mentioned. See also this comment from a medical article in the same post :

Quote:
Hikers are known to drink copious amounts of fluids until they produce gin clear urine. This is both an unphysiologic and unsafe practice.. In all likelihood, a significant number of hikers and skiers are developing encephalopathy at high altitude...
..which is not a theoretical concern by the authors , the starting point of the article is one of them encountering a case where hyponatremia was misdiagnosed first as severe AMS. In the same way as dehydration overlaps with early stages of AMS , there is a overlap at the other end with overhydration. Moderation would be the key word.
#10 Apr 29th, 2012, 02:20
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#10
vistet,
How do you square the above with 'myth 4' on the Telluride website, I'm not refuting you but asking, I dont have the medical knowledge to argue it. It may just be a term of art - how clear is clear?

Further,I can see how hynatremia could be misdiagnosed as AMS but how often is this said to happen? On an anecdotal level there were a few 'water overdose' deaths from clubbers dancing all night and drinking too much water during the MDMA fuelled 80s but given the number of people who clubbed drugged up at that time was it statistically significant?
#11 Apr 29th, 2012, 09:15
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#11
For a layman who bumped into this discussion while planning his 5 day trip to Leh. And who clearly was clueless about acclimatization coz he was planning the trip in 5 days.

How much water should he drink?
Can he booze, where and how much?
#12 Apr 29th, 2012, 18:16
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Ok NT, I accept this is getting a bit esoteric.....i suspect vistet and I can ramble on this one for ages. Steering it back to topic:

The safe answer is a referral to the IFAM website. Stay hydrated, if you feel thirsty, they you are on the way to dehydration. Its a hot desert.
On a personal level, for a 72kg bodyweight I drink 3+ litres a day doing nothing in Leh and up it to 4+ at 4000 metres and 5+ at 5000 metres. That has worked for me for years but is scarcely a scientific study. But then I get through 2-3 litres at work wearing a suit in the UK and I have trekked with a buddy who was 30% heavier but drank 30% less. Remember that I trek rather than ride in a taxi and walking in the sun anywhere meakes you sweat it out.

Booze? I am no stranger to the grain or grape but it stops the moment I get to the plane and starts again only in Delhi, with one exception, a small nip of brandy at the top to the highest point of any trek. The higher you go the more it affects you, I understand. Its freely availbale in Leh and I dont see much harm in a couple if you are in Leh, its just I prefer not to
#13 Apr 29th, 2012, 19:24
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#13
Quote:
Originally Posted by new_traveller View Post How much water should he drink?
The three liters from HRA is reasonable , IMHO for the group we are discussing here. Fluids , NB , not just water.



Quote:
Originally Posted by new_traveller View Post Can he booze, where and how much?
Yes. On the flight home. Flip comments aside , there is no way of telling the difference between early stages of AMS and hangover. The responsible traveller will have no choice but to stop or go down with headaches , the irresponsible will blame the alcohol and go on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by captain bruce View Post vistet,
How do you square the above with 'myth 4' on the Telluride
You mean giving them fluids ? First I would try to find out if they had drunk a lot , secondly I wouldnīt give plain water but something like Gatorade ( plan to pack this from now on ) or homemade ORS that wonīt make hyponatremia worse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by captain bruce View Post ..I can see how hynatremia could be misdiagnosed as AMS but how often is this said to happen? .. a few 'water overdose' deaths from clubbers dancing all night and drinking too much water during the MDMA fuelled 80s..
No need to go back to eighties , exercise associated hyponatremia is well known since the eighties.
In the Boston Marathon they found 13 % with hyponatremia , and 0.6 % at critical levels. There was an article from 2009 in the Swedish medical association journal that off the cuff mentioned two recent marathon studies , and four newborns taken to the neo-natal ICU with life threatening hyponatremia because their mothers had followed poor advice and jacked up their water intake last three months. Anyone working in the ICU long enough has seen hyponatremia in diverse forms. Outside that setting the most infamous example is Jennifer Strange , that died 2007 within a few hours after a water drinking contest arranged by a US radio station.
#14 May 2nd, 2012, 17:57
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#14
Is 10 days are sufficient for a bike trip from Delhi to Leh

Quote:
Originally Posted by new_traveller View Post Recently I see a lot of queries and itineraries which want to accomplish Leh, Pangong tso, Nubra and every other monastery in the region in 5 or lesser days. Just thought this might be a thread where such people can be referred to instead of giving them the same responses.

There can be 2 options to reach Leh
  1. By air
  2. By road

1. By air if you plan to do the usual hotspots in 5 days then you might be able to do some of the places
  • Day 1 Reach Leh - Acclimatize, visit shanti stupa and get permits
  • Day 2 Around Leh - Leh palace (which is not really interesting as per me, but then that is me) OR drive to magnetic hill and drass war memorial
  • Day 3 Go to Nubra (And I would request experts to correct me here), This can be tricky as you might not be acclimatized. Read the AMS thread and know the risks. Stay in Diskit or Hunder
  • Day 4 Back To leh.
  • Day 5 - Hemis and other Monasteries and back to Leh
OR
  1. Day 1 and 2 same as above
  2. Day 3 Hemis and other Monasteries
  3. Day 4 Pangong Tso and night halt (Know AMS and the risks, This can be really risky and I am sure other IMers will find this day risky and a bad suggestion by me)
  4. Day 5 Back to leh
2. By Road - If you plan to have a trip from Delhi or manali and want to finish it in 5 days then the best bet is to forget the trip and plan something else.
If you have 5 days in Leh then do something as suggested above.

Note - Keep 2 days for travel from Manali/Srinagar to and fro from Leh. A total of 4 days. (this will reduce your acclimitazation days to some extent)


For the newlyweds who are planning a romantic + adventurous + trip to Leh - Why not evaluate some other options before thinking about this place which you can do later in your life.
Coz
  • You don’t want to be sick with AMS on your honeymoon
  • You don’t want motion sickness to ruin your honeymoon
  • You might not find the cold desert romantic as it appears in the movies or in the pictures. Ladakh is beautiful but it is also tough and harsh. It is a dessert. It is a long days drive to reach pangong tso. And the lake is a cold salt water lake. Just so you know.


Overall the entire concept of doing ladakh in 5 days might not be accepted by me or many others on IM.


But I thought this thread is essential as I am tired explaining the same things to every new IMer who JUST wants to see everything in Ladakh in his few (difficult to get) leaves.

Getting leaves is tough these days but then that is no justification in trying to cover ladakh in that short period. You might end up only travelling, and missing out the real charm of ladakh.
Understand that this is one of the places that needs time. If you do not have time then better not try to do this. If you cannot extend leaves do not plan to see everything, limit yourself to see only what can be done in those number of days and go back to your life.

The Himalayas will call you soon. Trust me They will (I am still trying to figure out when do I go back)

Fellow IMers please add in if I am missing on something.
15 long trips !!!
Latest- Delhi-Manikaran-SARPASS trek-Delhi
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#15 May 2nd, 2012, 19:05
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#15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heaven.Riders View Post Is 10 days are sufficient for a bike trip from Delhi to Leh
I would say yes, BUT then it depends on what is your actual itinerary.

Come up with a draft and post it in the same section or THIS

This will help you know what could be changed if required.
Reply

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