Ambling on the Land of high passes - A Ladakh Travelouge

#1 Dec 3rd, 2016, 02:52
Join Date:
Apr 2016
Location:
Rajnandgaon
Posts:
9
  • palashisback is offline
#1
The Background

Until 2009 I did not know off the back of my mind what was in Ladakh. All I knew was that Ladakh was a region in the state of India that we call heaven on earth. And the only place I associated with Ladakh was Leh, so much so that I called the region trivially as Leh-Ladakh. Hell, I thought the city of Kargil was in Kashmir not in Ladakh.

Then came a movie that changed the thinking of a generation (for better or for worse - I do not know), 3 Idiots introduced to the masses that there was a place in India with silence so profound, you can hear your own thoughts, a place with a terrain so alien, you can choose to forget that you are in India. I will be honest though, 3 Idiots didn't get me excited about Ladakh, it sparked the curiosity but I didn't feed it. This is when the Indian government realized the potential that Ladakh has to be a major destination for people who enjoy adventure, who enjoy the wilderness. A big boom in tourism for Ladakh came out from travelers, travel bloggers, online travel agents and everyone who aspired to see these big naked mountains cut by those big mighty rivers. The final nail in the coffin for me however was, another movie that wasn't very popular in the masses but remains till date one of my favorite movies. It was the last directorial venture from Yash Chopra, it was titled Jab Tak Hai Jaan. There was a video out on Youtube showing Shahrukh Khan biking across Ladakh on a Royal Enfield. I was sold!, it was time to visit Ladakh, more so it was time to ride a bike in Ladakh, to conquer those arrogant passes who claim to be some of the highest motorable passes in the world, to see those distant stars that are so elusive to us city dwellers, and lastly to get away from the oh so routine life that I was living.

The journey to Ladakh took me 4 years to plan. 3.5 years of those were spent in gaining the trust of my family, that I can handle myself, and that I can plan a trip. and here we were, my brother and I, ready to embark on a journey, that I can honestly say, molded me and I can speak for my brother here, him into the human beings that we are today.

The initiation into Jammu and Kashmir

If you have seen the movie Jab we Met from Imtiaz Ali, I am sure you remember the scene shot in the streets of Ratlam and the dialogue from the actress roughly translating to " We are treading on the streets of Ratlam". That is how it is with me and Railway Stations. As the train leaves Pathankot Cantt to start its 3 hour journey to the infamous Jammu Tawi station, anticipation engulfed me. It had been a 33 hour journey to reach Jammu from my starting point - Durg. The coach almost empty, coach attendants were chatting to one another, and then we were there. At its first glance the station looks like from one of those Ruskin Bond stories but on close inspection one realizes the sheer number of people there, some spending the night to catch the early morning train to Katra, some waiting to catch the early morning train back to their city life, and some like me, waiting for the Hemkunt Express from Haridwar, not because I like waiting for trains, no, but because the train brought with it my brother, who I am sure slept like a baby during the entire journey. And here we were, two 19 year olds waiting for the dawn to start a new adventure, the Resfeber was at its best and yet we were peaceful, almost happy.

We were in Jammu and Kashmir, a state that is quickly becoming one of those places which you need to visit quick otherwise you may not be able to in future given the political situation. Now we were supposed to catch a Jet Airways flight to the city split by the Jhelum - Srinagar, we check in, board the flight and the uncertainty that always looms over in this region kicked in. It turned that because it was a warm day, the runway in the Srinagar airport had had some cracks, which led to the Air India flight that departed before us having its landing Tyre bursting and the flight getting stuck on the runway which led to cancellation of all subsequent flights, but not after we had been sitting in the flight for about 4 hours waiting for updates.



The Jet Airways flight that took from us an incredibly important day of rest at Srinagar. Damn you, heat and the effect you have on airport runways.
Well, once we got our refunds from Jet Airways, we went straight into the city to get a overnight taxi or bus to Srinagar since we had already lost a precious day of exploring Srinagar. We were lucky to find a guy who was delivering a brand new Maruti Suzuki Vehicle to a showroom in Srinagar overnight, and off we went like wanderers going into the dark night. The road to Srinagar is very well maintained and while it is a good 11 hour journey , with the right company, and the right vehicle, it should not be too daunting.

6 AM in the morning, and we are at Lal Chowk, I have read about this square in many a stories, seen it in many a movies, and to finally set feet on it was nothing short of a feeling of nostalgia for all those stories, for all those movies. It was Kashmir, heaven on earth, and we were there, we were there at last.
#2 Dec 3rd, 2016, 15:56
Join Date:
Apr 2016
Location:
Rajnandgaon
Posts:
9
  • palashisback is offline
#2

A Garden Expedition

It is 6 am in the valley and two wanderers have just set foot in the biggest city that the valley has to offer. Maybe they are searching for the same things that many who tread this path search for, or maybe they are looking for something different, or maybe they aren't looking for anything at all, maybe, they are just here to appreciate the valley, just to flirt with it for a short while, just here to go through waves of emotions with someone in a train before saying - "I would love to stay here and love you, but I have to go, this is my stop".

And here we were, Lal Chowk, early morning, we were tired from the overnight journey and yet we were excited, it took us 3 days from our place of origin but Kashmir has a way of making you forget of trivial things such as time. We took an auto from Lal Chowk to our accommodation - "Lonely Guest House", where we had kept Aijaz bhaijaan awake for most of the night and yet the man welcomed us, upgraded our rooms and let us sleep, telling us that we can take care of all formalities after all of us have had some much needed rest. Adequately rested, bathed, and generously fed with the deliciously yummy breakfast served by bhaijaan, we set off in an auto-rickshaw to explore a city that is as mysterious as it is treacherously beautiful. It was decided that we will start the day off by visiting The Masjid Baba Dawood Khaki, so as to be at peace for the day, and what caught our eye was the serenity. The entire mosque is build with utmost attention to symmetry, however taking pictures was not allowed there. After offering our prayers we then moved on to the city of gardens itself.


Our first stop is the well known Shalimar bagh, and to describe this masterpiece built by the Mughal emperor Jahangir is like trying describe a color that has not yet been invented. The location, the beauty, the shade, the water, the fountains, the pools, everything reeked of symmetry. The geometry nerd in my brother was dancing wildly, the attention to detail that has been given to this place is exquisite and satisfying. Instead of me describing it, I shall let the pictures taken by my brother do it justice.










Whether it be Shammi Kapoor trying to maintain his balance in "Tareef karu kya uski, jisne tujhe banaya", or Anushka Sharma making us jealous of her carefree attitude in "Jiya re", the city of Srinagar has been a dream location for directors, actors and audiences. And at the heart of this dream lies the ever beautiful and timeless, Dal lake. Now, don't get me wrong, this is as touristy of a place as it gets in Srinagar. People will try to scam you, prices will be over inflated, but a little bit of knowledge combined with a lot of common sense should be enough to have a good experience. And when I say a good experience in the Dal Lake, it is a breathtaking one. Again instead of trying to describe it, I believe photographs will do the trick better.












We lost an all important day in Srinagar due to issues discussed previously and thus after the Shikara ride in the pristine waters of the Dal lake, we decided to call it an evening and rest. We had a grueling journey for the next day that took us deeper into the mysterious land of High Passes, depths that neither of us could imagine.
A teacher, a scholar and at times a storyteller.

http://far-sickness.blogspot.dk/
#3 Dec 9th, 2016, 16:41
Join Date:
Nov 2013
Location:
Mumbai
Posts:
54
  • umeshparikh is offline
#3
Wonderful start...

Awesome clicks too...

Waiting for more...
#4 Dec 10th, 2016, 21:57
Join Date:
Apr 2016
Location:
Rajnandgaon
Posts:
9
  • palashisback is offline
#4

A Road that Connects Two Heavens - Part 1

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

A Poem by Robert Frost


For those of us who have studied in the Indian Educational system, we have definitely come across this one at least once. This poem was a big influence on my early choices as a high school student. And now that I am a postgraduate student, I realize the impact that these few lines have had in my life.

The valley and the wanderers, it was time for them to part, the brief fling was at its end, and they both knew it. The morning was like any other in Kashmir and yet it will never be the same for the brothers. It is an old saying in our part of the world that no man steps in the same river twice, for it is not the same river and he is not the same man. I believe that is what had happened. The eagerly awaited dawn arrived and brought with a it a deliciously hot cup of tea filled with mystery just like the journey it preceded. We climbed on to the top of the bus, set our luggage, marveled at the perspective that such a simple increase in height can give you, and off we went, with the sind river omnipresent by our side, we bid farewell to one of the heavens with a heavy heart to move towards another. 16 people from all parts of the world and all phases of life diving together into a world unknown, taking the road less traveled by.







And old Indian song has in its lyrics a hidden gem of a line that translates into english something like this - "The path you take will be filled with footsteps that join and footsteps that leave, and thus if you leave this path to pursue those footsteps, there will be nothing".

On our first stop of the journey, a small tea shop on the banks of the River Sind, we met the first pair of footsteps that joined us in this journey of timeless, boundless and almost ethereal beauty.As we stopped for tea, there was a slight commotion going on, I turn around and someone seems to be asking the driver of the bus something. With a little bit of enquiry, the situation presents itself, a girl wanted to get some medication to prevent nausea, that often presents itself in these mountain roads, from her luggage which is perched on top of the bus. As a solution we simply offer the medication we had in our carry on bags, conversation starts, introductions are made, and the next thing you know, 4 people are sitting in the seats surrounding the drivers cabin, singing old Kishore Kumar songs, talking about their experiences, sharing the fun stories from their college lives. The two girls that joined us in our borderline crazy behaviour, were going on a trekking expedition with a group, and needles to say, they were, like us, borderline crazy as well. Fun times, fun times.

Then came the our first exposure to the dangers that this road has to offer, in the form of first of the many high passes we will conquer in the two weeks that followed. The mighty Zoji La. Just above the Baltal Base Camp for Amarnath yatra, this road, or should I say sandy path is every bit curvaceous as it it treacherous. Long traffic jams are commonplace here and one could see why. The curves are simply too steep for us city dwelling drivers. And the start difference in terrain that one can observer on either side of the pass is simply startling. Gone are the green mountains with snow capped peaks, replaced by the untamed, wild, naked and sun-kissed mountains. Life takes a backseat in these mountains and settlements are few and far between.











It is lunch time, 16 people famished but fulfilled, an interesting situation. The battle between the eyes and the stomach, Eyes that want to see more but the stomach that doesn't know anything about anything except food and then there is the mind trying to balance the impulses, who says the the human body is not complicated. Well the stomach wins in the end and here we are, Drass, one of the coldest inhabited place in India. We eat to our heart's or should I say stomach's content, fed and served by two lovely Nepalese ladies, who had basically decided that it there responsibility to find their two Indian brothers a beautiful Nepalese wife. We move on, as wanderers do, and the journey feels as if it is our destination. Actually, this was our destination, the journey, the road, the experience.


The road continues, and as it unfolds, it brings with it sights that these poor eyes have never seen, an oasis in the midst of these cold desert, as if forming a green river between the naked mountains.




And then there was me, unable yet willing to take it all in, soak every bit of life that was in all this.


Our end point for the day was Kargil, a city sitting quietly by the confluence of the brown water from the Drass river irrigating the Indian part of Kashmir and the Blue waters flowing in from the Pakistan Occupied Kashmir. The waters converge in Kargil forming the River Suru. We had booked our accommodation for the night at Hotel Rangyul, and we were greeted by Hussain, who politely told us that due to overbooking in their hotel, we had been upgraded to a better room in his cousin's property which was a resort, and boy was it a resort. Taking utmost care that we face no problem with the situation, he took care of all formalities and set us up in a spacious room that was definitely worth more than we paid for. On knowing that our bus leaves at 4 AM next morning he basically ordered us to be ready at 3:30 am next morning as he himself will come and pick us up from the resort in his private vehicle and drop us off at the location of the bus to ensure we do not miss it and he ordered the hotel staff to keep packed breakfast ready for us, that early in the morning. It just goes to show you, how sincere people are in these regions and how incredible customer service can win you customers for life. We already know where we will stay whenever we will be in Kargil.

This concluded a day that was full of surprises, new experiences, new acquaintances, new sights and a whole new perspective on life, and how simple it is. As I said before, life takes a backseat in these naked mountains.
#5 Dec 12th, 2016, 14:23
Join Date:
Nov 2013
Location:
Mumbai
Posts:
54
  • umeshparikh is offline
#5
Wonderful update...
Waiting for more...
#6 Dec 18th, 2016, 18:55
Join Date:
Apr 2016
Location:
Rajnandgaon
Posts:
9
  • palashisback is offline
#6

The Road that Connects Two Heavens - Part 2

"The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one'sown country as a foreign land."

-G.K. Chesterton

3:30 AM in the morning, one can hear the brushing of teeth, the splashing of water, and the gathering of belongings. What one cannot hear is the fast paced beating of the hearts, the anxious, excited thoughts running through the minds of the brothers as they depart from their final resting place before they arrive at their destination. Hussain calls, he is ready, the staff of the resort calls, the packed breakfast is ready, but the question remains, are they ready, ready to embark on the final leg of a journey that will finally leave them in a place that they have only fantasized about, a place that they have only seen glimpses of. One of the brothers says - There is only one way to find out. And off they go, sometimes things are meant to be simple, and we complicate them, and sometimes it is the other way around. The journey to Leh from Kargil, can be both, depending on your perspective. This is when you see how loud the silence can get in these valleys, and how friendly these dauntingly naked mountains seem.

Our first stop is a small tea shop in a nearby village, a small fire crackling in the middle of nowhere, and packed lunch for 4 shared between all 16 (yes, they packed in enough for everyone to eat). Everyone is tired, many ares asleep, many are trying to sleep, and yet here we are, the four borderline crazy people, still singing along, much to the curiosity of our bus driver. The terrain becomes barren as each mile is covered, and the sight of people becomes rarer and rarer, but what we do see, is a place without connectivity. You cannot spend hours browsing on the internet in this place, but then again, you are not meant to. Here is a lifestyle that is mostly unheard of for us city dwellers, dependent on technology for almost everything. There is no winner here between the two lifestyles, but the journey shows you the other side of the coin. It goes to show us how important changing your lifestyle, if only for a few days can be.

Our final stop before Leh is Lamayuru, a tiny village, which houses one of the biggest monasteries that Ladakh has to offer. We were not fortunate enough to pay it a visit however. But as soon as we set foot in the village of Lamayuru, the architecture student in my brother woke up, and starting lecturing me on all the different materials and styles and designs used by the villagers against all the different natural phenomenons they have to face, and I will be honest here, many of the terms didn't make any sense to me. But since he wanted to talk so much there, I shall let my brother do the talking with his pictures from here.

















As we moved on from Lamayuru towards Leh, the terrain started to become a lot more plateau like, with the roads no longer curvaceous and steep, but more plain and straight, surrounded by the omnipresent naked mountains.







As we approached Leh, the first sign of civilization to our eyes was, yes you guessed it right, a State Bank of India ATM.


Then comes the Leh Airport, and everywhere in between, Army bases. The sight of Indian army in Leh is as common as the sight of everything else. It is a part of the life that the Ladakhi people live, and a part of our lives for next two weeks. And then came the town itself, bustling and crackling with people from all across the world. The road had ended, and we were at last in the second heaven. It was time to unravel and explore.
#7 Dec 19th, 2016, 16:30
Join Date:
Nov 2013
Location:
Mumbai
Posts:
54
  • umeshparikh is offline
#7
Wonderful update...

Beautiful clicks...
#8 Dec 30th, 2016, 17:09
Join Date:
Apr 2016
Location:
Rajnandgaon
Posts:
9
  • palashisback is offline
#8

The Fabled City

This was the end of National Highway 1, starting from Uri in Kashmir Valley and ending a Leh in the Ladakh region. The rickety bus made its way through potholes and narrow roads to dock itself into the Bus Station guarded by the same naked mountains that had taken care of the wanderers throughout the journey. It seemed that the brothers were far away from home and yet could feel themselves at ease. The city looked welcoming and people looked peaceful, at least on the first sight. Bidding goodbye to companions who had partnered us into making our bus driver hate Kishore Kumar for the rest of his life, and wishing luck to everyone who was a part of their journey on NH-1, they set off to Choglamsar, a small hamlet on the shores of the mighty Indus. Rested but famished, we finally decided to go to the fabled city.

Imagine a city, an important city, so important that it is the headquarters of your district, with all the required offices, and administrative centers. A city that is easily the most populated among every inhabitable place nearby, and is also a landing pad for every tourist who visits the region. What do you imagine, I for one imagine the city to be a claustrophobic, crowded space littered with hotels and shops whose sole purpose is to attract the tourists. Leh is anything but that. Granted Leh has not yet had the chance to get commercialized just yet, and I think I am lucky that I got the chance to visit it before the sword drops. I remember reading somewhere "One's destination is never a place but a new way of seeing things". The line seems to fit what was going on in mind as I observed this mystic city.
A clean and spaced out city, which was not necessarily organised probably summarizes Leh. I believe it is slowly becoming a victim of its unplanned expansion to cater the increasing number of people who visit it each year, but as off now, it reminds me of the years of vacations spent in my maternal grandparents' place. It used to be a small town in Madhya Pradesh, with those Sunday markets being the highlight of the week. On other days you could just stroll down the main market street or the so called Bazaar, and spend your day their, observing the hordes of human activities going on, there was always something to entertain yourself with, always a place to hangout and chill with your friends.






While growing up in my hometown, we had many a times so called tamasha, it could mean anything from snake charmers to monkey shows. But over the years as my town grew and prospered, these nukkad tamasha's were replaced by the mundane. After so many years I experienced what I call a throwback. Whenever I visit these mountainous cities, I always observe that the life here seems to be slow paced, with everyone enjoying moments instead of milestones. Now i may be completely wrong of life here, but that is what I feel when I am in these cities, that life takes a back seat.









And of course if the abundance of activities fail to entertain you, you can always rely on the dog that believes that he is a lion.


Tucked away in one of the lazy corners of the city is a food court, and in this food court was a cafe that was to become our mainstay for food in Leh. The Rendezvous Cafe Leh & German Bakery, serving cuisines from almost all around the world to cater the non Indian visitors, this is where we got the first hand exposure to cafes that cater to people not from India at reasonable prices. They have Indian food too, of course. It served for us, and I am sure for many others (including the lovely dog in the next picture), to wind up our days, discuss ideas and basically relax after the day. We quickly became friends with the two people who worked in the Cafe and learnt the ins and out of the city from them.


This next picture is almost perfect in my opinion, it was accidental and its a badly taken picture, but the result actually shows how the surrounding seems to us when we are standing or sitting around with our close friends talking about thousands of nothings that all mean everything. Everything else is a blur.


The day came to a close as we bought necessary groceries to feed ourselves, as our tented accommodation was far from the city, and the city went dark pretty quickly. However in Leh you can always find a shared cab to wherever you want to go.


With this and the next day set free of activities so as to get acclimatized to the altitude, I had not expected anything noteworthy to happen, but as it turned out, the destination can just mean a new way of seeing things, which is what happened in Leh. We discovered that life be measured in moments and not milestones.We discovered that sometimes all you need, is to sit quietly in the bazaar and observe the myriad of activities of life going on around us.
#9 Feb 3rd, 2017, 17:43
Join Date:
Apr 2016
Location:
Rajnandgaon
Posts:
9
  • palashisback is offline
#9

Ambling on the Land of High passes - A Ladakh Travelouge - The Sham Valley Recollecti

"The connection to place, to the land, the wind, the sun, stars, the moon... it sounds romantic, but it's true - the visceral experience of motion, of moving through time on some amazing machine - a few cars touch on it, but not too many compared to motorcycles. I always felt that any motorcycle journey was special."

- Antoine Predock


No matter how much your perspective changes about life and no matter how excited you are to explore your surroundings, one of the biggest challenges in travelling to the mountains is to get out of the warmth of the blanket into the cold mornings. Duly rested, we took off back to the fabled city to get our hands on the one thing that had us the most excited for Ladakh. Yes, you guessed it right, a Royal Enfield motorbike.The course for the day was already decided on, we were going to explore the Sham valley and ease into riding a motorcycle in the mountains. There is something about it though - riding a Royal Enfield on the mountainous roads, it is hard to describe but you feel it in your hands gripping the handlebar, in your legs changing the gears, on your face when the wind teases you, it is hard to describe like I said, but those who have felt it, know exactly what I am talking about.

And of course when you have roads like these, it is kind of hard to not feel like you are riding on the top of the world.


After riding along Leh for a while to dust some of the rust that us city dwellers inevitably develop, we had a typical Indian lunch in one of the many roadside eateries spread around across Leh and off we went towards our first stop - Gurudwara Pathar Sahib. Legend has it that during his travels through the Tibetan plateau, Guru Nanak Dev Ji arrived in Leh and were resting at this location and he heard the woes of the local people who were terrorized by a demon who also lived atop the mountain nearby. The demon raging due to the local people worshiping the Nanak Lama - pushed a large boulder on him, however as soon as the boulder touched the body of the Guru, it turned as soft as warm wax. On realizing that he has failed to kill the Lama the demon kicked the boulder in anguish leading to a foot impression being formed on the warm wax like boulder. This made the demon realize powerlessness against the boundless spiritual energy of the Lama and mended his ways.


The Gurudwara is taken care of by the Indian army and I consider it the Lama's blessing that we met a soldier from our part of India there. His companions told us that he asks everyday if someone from Chhattisgarh came to visit the Gurudwara and was very happy to finally have his wish fulfilled.

The journey continued as we were traversing through the naked mountains to arrive at our second stop, The oh so famous magnetic hills of Ladakh, is it real, is it an illusion, we didn't care, we enjoyed rolling against gravity (at least it looked that way) and we left but not before clicking one for our beautiful companion.


The Indus had been flowing not so quietly with us all the way and now it had decided to amalgamate with its tributary (too much geography, I like to call them friends), the Zanskar at the confluence.


And this is where our day changed, we decided not to follow the Indus into the rest of the sham valley, but turned our bike to follow the Zanskar instead heading towards Chilling (believe it or not that is the name of a village), as we wanted to simply take in this feel of motorcycle riding without too many disturbances, and boy did it pay off for us. The terrain got rougher, the mountains became a little more daunting, the road was as good as ever (Hats off to BRO), but the ride, it was ethereal.





Looking at the much talked about river rafting in the Zanskar, we couldn't help but feel a longing to be in those rafts.







Nothing, and I mean nothing beats the feeling of lying on a bed of rocks, staring at the faded moon in the afternoon, surrounded by a gurgling river and daunting mountains, while wearing flip flops (cheeky isn't it).





A few miles before Chilling however, we were stopped, and just as well, they saved us from being stuck in Chilling for a day or two. The BRO is constructing a road throught he zanskar valley as an alternative route to Leh, a route that will be open all year round. And during this work they need to cut mountains and that is what was going on that day.


They had done the required blasting on that cliff earlier in the morning and were waiting for it to basically disintegrate after which this road would be blocked a couple of days. They stopped us from going further but allowed us to witness the disintegration. Well you know cool men don't look at explosions.


And this is where we decided to head back to Leh and catch some of the local sights.





The one place you need to visit in Leh is the Shanti Stupa, it sits on top of a hill overlooking the entirety of the fabled city.







This was then followed by the usual walking along the main square of Leh and immersing ourselves in the hustling and bustling of the activities going on, dinner at the Rendezvous, and the ride back to Choglamsar. You never know when a change of plan occurs, and you never what taking a different road might bring to us. It is as they, we took the road less taken, and that has made all the difference.

Similar Threads

Title, Username, & Date Last Post Replies Views Forum
Trip Report :Ladakh Jul 4th, 2017 16:19 63 9748 Ladakh & Zanskar
The Chronicles of Ladakh 6500Kms,12 High Altitude Passes, 7 Lakes, 2 Tough Highways Apr 17th, 2015 17:39 115 25455 Car, Motorbike, and Bike Photologues


Posting Rules

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Forum Rules»
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2
© IndiaMike.com 2018
Page Load Success