Kolkata during festival of Durga Puja (2018) Things to see and Eat ?

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#61 Nov 7th, 2018, 16:29
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#61
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Originally Posted by iamsomnath View Post "promito" .
That sounds suspiciously similar to mitron.....besides tomm is 8th november. I almost had a heart attack..


Last edited by vaibhav_arora; Nov 7th, 2018 at 21:49..
#62 Nov 7th, 2018, 17:05
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#62
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Originally Posted by arupratan ghosh View Post
In most of the cases if a Bengali stays outside Bengal for more than 5/6 years or a decade he/she usually tends to forget the crux of the grammatical aspects, sadly.
Both Chomsky's universal grammer, and Whorf's studies show otherwise. We do not unlearn our first language. A bong will never, just like a Gujarati will never forget what they learnt from 0-5 years.
#63 Nov 7th, 2018, 18:06
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#63
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Originally Posted by vaibhav_arora View Post That sounds supciously similar to mitron.....besides tomm is 8th november. I almost had a heart attack..


Now now, I hear all mods are paid in fresh greenbacks , they have everything to be afraid of . Nothing matters to a pauper like me.,😁😂
Last edited by iamsomnath; Nov 8th, 2018 at 09:30..
#64 Nov 7th, 2018, 18:20
It's all Greek to me, but Benglish will do
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#64
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Originally Posted by nycank View Post Both Chomsky's universal grammer, and Whorf's studies show otherwise. We do not unlearn our first language. A bong will never, just like a Gujarati will never forget what they learnt from 0-5 years.

On the other hand, the process of linguistic attrition definitely does exist.

Here is an extreme example :
https://www.babbel.com/en/magazine/p...age-attrition/

I know multi-lingual friends who have trouble with their mother tongues. (French taking precedence over Greek, for example ; or French taking over English in bilingual speakers).

I am guilty of "code-switching" between English, French and Greek.
#65 Nov 7th, 2018, 21:45
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#65
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Originally Posted by nycank View Post A bong will never, just like a Gujarati will never forget what they learnt from 0-5 years.
No one unlearns the language completely . But they do miss finer touches. Lots of instances are there . Yes, lots of.

Exceptions are dramatically less, mostly confined to the ' Enlightened ' ones. I know a few persons who have been doing fantastic works in Bengali staying outside Bengal / abroad for long. But they do not represent the larger section of the mass.
#66 Nov 8th, 2018, 00:51
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#66
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post Few has become my Most Confusing English Word Ever.
few... not many, a very small number. Always greater than zero, probably more than two.

a few... a larger number, several, but not a lot
But I think that American usage has turned that upside down, so now, when people say "few," I have no idea what they mean!
As far as I know, the use of "few" to mean "a few" is Indian English. It certainly isn't American usage.

In general the use of articles can be confusing. The Russians I know invariably use articles when they shouldn't and omit them when they should be used.

But the distinction between "few" and "a few" is subtle---the intent is completely changed. I don't think Nick's definitions above capture it:

"Few people think that..." = I am trying to say no one thinks that unless they're crazy, but I am too polite to say that explicitly

"A few people think that..." = There are some people who think that...


We could next talk about the confusion between "less" and "few". But this thread is already wandering more than usual.
#67 Nov 8th, 2018, 04:05
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#67
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Originally Posted by RPG View Post As far as I know, the use of "few" to mean "a few" is Indian English. It certainly isn't American usage.
Thanks for correcting me about that. I tend to assume that when I hear changes in English usage these days, they are inspired by America. Even the ones in England!

Sadly, at least what I see written, eg on Team-BHP (an Indian cars/driving forum) "few" is now usually used when [I think] they mean "a few." It is almost as bad as using "than" with no qualifier, ie to mean "more than."
~
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#68 Nov 8th, 2018, 09:59
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#68

Kali puja pandal hopping and lighting

Now back to the original topic again.
Photographs of Kali puja pandal hopping, Biryani stall and lighting (I guess the electrician artists made a replica of Falcon rocket).

Biryani's are usually two types- Mutton Biryani and Chicken Biryani. Rest of the varieties do not qualify.

And we bongs do not believe in fasting with "vrat" grade foods. It's festival time and we must have non-veg and sweets.
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#69 Nov 8th, 2018, 10:44
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#69

Jagatdhatri Puja

On the 8th day from Deepawali (next Asthami after Durga Puja), we worship another form of Devi Shakti- Maa Jagatdharti.

Jagatdhatri idol is 4 handed, sitting on a Lion. Depending on family tradition, she may be accompanied by Shiva.

Idol colour may vary as per family tradition. Puja rituals are almost same like Durgapuja, done in a single day including the Yagna (worshiping the fire). Chandannagar sub-urb area (about 50 km from Kolkata, on the left bank of Hooghly river) is famous for the Jagatdhatri puja, pandals and lighting.

Once upon a time we used to have Jagatdhatri puja with idol at home. Now my aged parents cannot manage the show in such large scale. It's just a homely puja without the idol, just offering fruits to the goddess. No elaborate bhog (cooked items like Khichdi, fries, curries, fired rice, fishes, payasam, rasopulli etc.) anymore.

I could find some old photographs of my mother sending off the Goddess next day after puja.
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#70 Nov 8th, 2018, 19:18
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#70
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Originally Posted by rajatchakraborty View Post On the 8th day from Deepawali (next Asthami after Durga Puja), we worship another form of Devi Shakti- Maa Jagatdharti.

Jagatdhatri idol is 4 handed, sitting on a Lion. Depending on family tradition, she may be accompanied by Shiva.
This like Kali ?
#71 Nov 8th, 2018, 19:49
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#71
No, Devi Jagatdhatri is more like Devi Durga. It's her calm form, sitting on a lion, four hands instead of 10 hands, and her children (ganesha, lakshmi, saraswati and kartik) are not accompanying her this time.
The puja rituals are usually completed within one day. However in Chandannagar area it's spread over 4 days.
#72 Nov 11th, 2018, 10:08
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#72
artistic maa kali idol..with shiva and dragons.
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