What's for Lunch?

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#256 Feb 5th, 2013, 23:35
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#256
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Originally Posted by JuliaF View Post I don't think you get badgers in India so here's a picture of one from wikipedia.
At present, I am the only badger around here!

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I was of course very cross with them but couldn't help laughing at the thought of their handsome black and white faces all stained pink from the beetroot
I've just now eaten a bit of the halwa and you can imagine how I might be looking!
#257 Feb 5th, 2013, 23:35
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#257
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Originally Posted by naveenamohanrao View Post Here in Mumbai, Gujaratis prepare 'chunda / Chundo', from raw mangoes (particular varieties are used). ..
Yes, I've tasted that.

In Andhra Pradesh we have a few varieties of sweet pickles, usually with jaggery instead of sugar:

http://www.sailusfood.com/2008/05/05...-mango-pickle/

Allam (ginger) Pachadi again with jaggery, is terrific with idlis:
http://www.sailusfood.com/2008/06/30...inger-chutney/
“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it’s time to pause and reflect.” - Mark Twain
#258 Feb 5th, 2013, 23:37
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#258
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Originally Posted by theyyamdancer View Post
We have a tame hawk in our garden - sorry people - this is totally OFF TOPIC. And we were wondering what to feed it! At the moment we are giving it catfood.

A tame hawk??? Is it injured?

Aren't you scared it will go for the cats?

(maybe care of tame hawks should be in the birds thread?)
#259 Feb 5th, 2013, 23:38
It's all Greek to me, but Benglish will do
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#259
No, not at all. It has adopted us.
#260 Feb 5th, 2013, 23:39
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#260
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Originally Posted by Hyderabadi View Post In Andhra Pradesh we have a few varieties of sweet pickles, usually with jaggery instead of sugar:

http://www.sailusfood.com/2008/05/05...-mango-pickle/

Allam (ginger) Pachadi again with jaggery, is terrific with idlis:
http://www.sailusfood.com/2008/06/30...inger-chutney/
I agree!!!

Andhra pickles are my favorite! Especially Gongura Pachadi/chutney and spicy Avakaai pickles. I am yet to learn making them.
#261 Feb 6th, 2013, 00:09
It's all Greek to me, but Benglish will do
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#261
Here is the chocolate beetroot cake recipe:

CHOCOLATE-BEET LAYER CAKE

2 medium beets, trimmed
1/2 Tbs. vegetable oil
6 oz. (3/4 cup) unsalted butter, softened; more for the pans
9 oz. (2 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour; more for the pans
2 oz. (2/3 cup) natural cocoa powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt
1-3/4 cups granulated sugar
2 large eggs, at room temperature
1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 375°F. Put the beets on a piece of foil large enough to wrap them. Drizzle with the vegetable oil and turn to coat well. Enclose the beets in the foil and roast until tender when pierced with a paring knife, about 1 hour. Let cool.
Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F. Coat two 9-inch round cake pans generously with softened butter. Line the bottom of the pans with parchment and coat the parchment with butter. Dust the pans with flour, tapping out any excess.
Peel and finely grate enough of the beets to yield 3/4 cup. Sift the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt into a medium bowl.
Using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or an electric hand mixer, beat the butter and sugar on medium-low speed until fluffy, about 3 minutes. Beat in the eggs, one at a time. Mix in the grated beets and the vanilla. Reduce the speed to low and carefully add half of the flour mixture; mix until fully incorporated. Add 1-1/4 cups hot water and the remaining flour mixture, return to medium-low speed and mix until smooth, about 2 minutes. Divide the batter evenly between the prepared pans, smoothing the tops.
Bake the cakes, rotating halfway through baking, until a toothpick inserted in the center of the cakes comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Cool the cakes in their pans on a rack for 10 minutes and then turn them out onto racks and peel off the parchment. Let the cakes cool completely.
#262 Feb 6th, 2013, 09:59
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#262
.

Quote:
Originally Posted by naveenamohanrao View Post Andhra pickles are my favorite! Especially Gongura Pachadi/chutney and spicy Avakaai pickles. I am yet to learn making them.

Check these recipes for: Aavakaaya (mustard+mango) and Gongura (sorrel leaves chutney)


Thanks for the carrot halwa recipe. So it is basically cooking → grated carrots + sugar + khoya/ mawa/ kova.

Beetroot halwa looks like dracula food. .. .. It looks very nice with deep purple colour. I also never had it.
#263 Feb 6th, 2013, 14:02
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#263
South Indian pickles are meant only to be eaten with curd rice and are made extra salty. Which is why they are not much suitable for regular food.

Also originators of halwa including beetroot halwa,gajaar halwa are Punjabis. Proof of this can be seen in Gurdwaras and Punjabi Hindu Temples where Suji Halwa (the best there is) is served as pershad.
#264 Feb 6th, 2013, 14:05
It's all Greek to me, but Benglish will do
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#264
G-to-T
I had to google "Suji Halwa" to discover that it is very similar to the Greek pudding called samali.
#265 Feb 6th, 2013, 14:09
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#265
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Originally Posted by theyyamdancer View Post G-to-T
I had to google "Suji Halwa" to discover that it is very similar to the Greek pudding called samali.
Please do visit your local Gurudwara for sampling some and also carrying some back for later (carry a small polythene cover).
#266 Feb 6th, 2013, 14:10
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#266
In Maharashtra they make a similar sweet called "Shira" or "Sheera". In South similar sweet is called "Kesari".
#267 Feb 6th, 2013, 15:13
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#267
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Originally Posted by RWeHavingFunYet View Post .

Check these recipes for: Aavakaaya (mustard+mango) and Gongura (sorrel leaves chutney)
Avakaaya pickle is looking so spicy...I am already drooling! Maybe this summer, I will try to make it.

Gongura chutney, I get from my brother-in-law. He gets it religiously from Hyderabad when ever he visits. When there is free supply, I would take my sweet time to learn making it.


Quote:
Thanks for the carrot halwa recipe. So it is basically cooking → grated carrots + sugar + khoya/ mawa/ kova.
Yes, that is the traditional way, but I don't use milk or khoya, instead I use 'sweetened condensed milk'.

Quote:
Beetroot halwa looks like dracula food. ..
You mean, I am a 'DRACULA'?

Direct from 'badger' to 'Dracula'...?

BTW, today I had for lunch - 'Undhyu'!! A Gujju friend had prepared it and brought a full box of it for me.
#268 Feb 6th, 2013, 17:46
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#268
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Originally Posted by aarosh View Post In Maharashtra they make a similar sweet called "Shira" or "Sheera". In South similar sweet is called "Kesari".
Kesari is definitely no patch on the original suji(semolina/rava) halwa. It is prepared too sweet with some colouring (in kesari) to give a artificial kesar tint.

No Punjabi house can be caught dead with such a contraption.
#269 Feb 6th, 2013, 18:24
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#269
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Originally Posted by Gametotravel View Post Kesari is definitely no patch on the original suji(semolina/rava) halwa. It is prepared too sweet with some colouring (in kesari) to give a artificial kesar tint.
Seems like you have had no opportunity to taste genuine 'Kesari bhaath' till date in south! Agreed that most commercial establishments use kesari, the food color, but I don't remember my mom using food color especially for sweets, till date - be it Kesari bhaath (both types - semolina as well as rice), rabdi and even 'basundi', which she excels in. Most of the times, I pick up 'saffron strand' boxes ( 5gm, 10gm, etc) from Crawford market for her.

Also, many who prepare sweets (at home) would actually use only genuine 'saffron strands', unless somebody wants to make it look only decorative.


Down south, we prepare Kesari bhath in many ways using seasonal fruits. I make it with banana sometimes and if we are getting sweet pineapples, then it is pineapple shira.

Quote:
No Punjabi house can be caught dead with such a contraption.
I haven't had the opportunity to try.

Last but not least - the 'Satyanarayana pooja' prasadam along with Panchamrutam (I insist, homemade) - what we usually distribute in Bangalore, is heavenly!
#270 Feb 6th, 2013, 18:50
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#270
Suji halwa is different.
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