Traditional Ubiquitous Kitchenware

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#31 Sep 17th, 2014, 19:50
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#31
This looks like a garānsā, the lethal weapon of choice in rural Bihar before the submachine gun became a household item there.
#32 Sep 17th, 2014, 20:03
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#32
Lol
And here's another picture to ponder on .. Belongs to my Grandma, currently in my home, though we hardly use it (too heavy )
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#33 Sep 17th, 2014, 20:15
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#33
That looks like pestle and mortar...
#34 Sep 17th, 2014, 20:20
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#34
Yup, an enlarged version. Used to grind coconut for gravy or to make batter for idli, dosa etc.
#35 Sep 17th, 2014, 21:15
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#35

Re: Traditional Ubiquitous Kitchenware

Quote:
Originally Posted by piyukamath View Post There is another special knife for that, have one at home. It's similar to one of the pictures that Brishti has put up. We call it Koythi.
A hammer would just break the poor coconut into small bits
This is 'daa' in bengali.during durgapuja dozens of green coconuts are procured from trees,the Goddess drinks tender coconut water(and us too ). this is the most useful tool then to break open each of them,take out the water as well as the tender soft flesh.
#36 Sep 17th, 2014, 22:43
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#36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fing Fang View Post That looks like pestle and mortar...
Quote:
Originally Posted by piyukamath View Post Yup, an enlarged version. Used to grind coconut for gravy or to make batter for idli, dosa etc.
The manual form of the now ubiquitous electric wet grinder? Godd grief, watch one of those working on idli mix for a few minutes and imagine doing the job by hand!
#37 Sep 17th, 2014, 23:20
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#37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post The manual form of the now ubiquitous electric wet grinder? Godd grief, watch one of those working on idli mix for a few minutes and imagine doing the job by hand!
Grandma used it till she was about 78; she'll still use it to grind up some tasty fish curry masala for us probably, but we don't let her
#38 Sep 17th, 2014, 23:36
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#38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post ... imagine doing the job by hand!
Quote:
Originally Posted by piyukamath View Post ... but we don't let her
Then who does it?
#39 Sep 17th, 2014, 23:44
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#39
No one uses it anymore, too cumbersome and heavy
#40 Sep 17th, 2014, 23:47
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#40
I bought a heavy granite one in London just so I could make green chutney without adding water which would be required in a mixer-grinder. I also use it for recipes that require ground onions/garlic/ginger. The tactile part of cooking is half the fun.

My recipe is:

Many green chiilies
Two bunches of dhania (coriander) leaves
some sugar and salt (ideally sea salt)
some dessicated coconut
shelled peanuts
lemon/lime juice (lots)
elbow power
#41 Sep 18th, 2014, 02:10
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#41
Its unnerving seeing one of these in use. The Cracker holds the coconut in his left hand and chops down with the right half severing it. Why most of them are not one-armed is beyond me.
#42 Sep 18th, 2014, 02:15
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#42
They are one handed. I keep holding it for them from below on and on.
#43 Sep 18th, 2014, 02:25
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#43
This looks so pretty to roll your rotis on:

#44 Sep 18th, 2014, 02:31
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#44
I prefer patla belans/velans (svelte rolling pins) myself as i have become an expert at 'em - and at least my galfriends have less weight to hit me with.
#45 Sep 18th, 2014, 02:34
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#45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golghar View Post This looks so pretty to roll your rotis on:
That is a very beautiful looking roti pin and rolling board.

Where can I get me one of those from??
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