Things you wanted to know but were afraid to ask! FOOD!
Digital Drifter
India > Entertainment and Food in India > Community Forums > Indian Cooking and Cuisine
#46
| Loud Noisy Bird
Well, B-T, I don't think that you'll be missed, I'm afraid.

It would appear that your measure of civilisation is actually westernisation: a pretty dubious measure.

You really think that sophistication is measured by knowledge of English or American rock musicians? One of the musicians I know who took part in the Concert for George [Harrison] was completely unaware of who Eric Clapton is. Not very sophisticated, eh? ...Maybe not, but just try and match his depth of knowledge and understanding of Indian classical music or his ability to join and improvise with any style or rhythm of music from anywhere in the world.

As to your general tone (sorry we are obviously 'misconstruing' you) I'd be complaining just as much if you were trying to say the same things about eg Birmingham and London. If anyone has any kind of chip on their shoulder it is surely you. How would you like it if I was to say that, as a Londoner, I doubt that I'd get much from meeting with you and your Bangalore mates? Just a little bit rude?

Should we meet in Chennai ever, do please remember to speak slowly to me and try to make allowances for the fact that I just can't be expected to meet up to your levels of sophistication. Not that I'd want to...

Wasted rant, as you won't be reading this thread anyway.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#47
| Member
my measure s a "sorry" after a burp !!! :P
#48
| Member
at the very least i meant...
#49
| Member
oh well nick, i guess you assumed t was at you.. the "misconstruing" was done by analog aboriginal.

i have had tamil friends from chennai and b'lore for a long time now.. about 10 years. not that they are all sophisticated or know that hovercraft is the name of eddie vedder's wife band (beth liebling? ring a bell? ). i know precisely just how erudite they (ei.. the people of chennai) can be and how good at the sciences too. the point that i always wanted to drive at in this thread was that NOT ALL ARE THE CROW FEEDING BURPING TYPE. also no custom/habit in india, be it a bood one or an objectonable one, is common to the whole nation. (for eg.. you dont see hydrabadi hospitality anywhere else in india save perhaps lucknow. i know cos i have friends and relatives from both places. the odd couple of weeks spend in this part of the planet doesnt so easily an expert of a person make regardng the many many customs of india. i know quite a bit of it.. about 11% :D).

please read my frst reply to this thread and you will know what really i was drivng at. and it was THAT post whcih was "misconstrued" by a drifter (and none else at that point), and a lot many balls were squarely put in my court.. leading to this transcontinental conflict that we have here. (just when, why and how you factored into ths, i havent yet fgured out.)


repeating the jist of what i had to say for everyone's benifit :-
1) not everyone in india is like that. like lots of people chew paan. not everyone does. like lots of people into good stuff like indan classical music (yours truely included). not everyone though. some like "hindi" pop.
2) the "customs" that were referred to by drifter in the very first post.. are mailny the sort to be found in the south. never said good or bad. just that it dont hold for all india the same way the "hanuman worshp" is more a u.p.-bihar thing than a "whole india" thing.
it was THESE two points which were turned on ther heads. i do hope i have made myself clear.

well i did read your post. but would appreciate it a lot if i dont have to read another.
#50
| bang a whore? Bangalore Dammit!

Originally posted by: Nick-HI wasn't thinking so much of the visit to the nearby sink as those occasions on which one gets water poured over one's hands by ones host, or might be expected to do same for a guest



That might be a hold-over from the days in life in villages? In villages, usually, there is a drum filled with water with a brass jug in it. After the elders finish eating, someone pours water from the drum onto their hands with the jug so as to not to 'pollute' the water. Imagine, both your hands have food on it and you want to wash your hands; dipping your hand into the drum to retrieve the jug would cause food particles to fall into the water rendering it unusable for others to wash up. Hence the practice or so I would think....

But hey, you seem to receiving full and complete attention wherever you went with people actually doing that stuff for you, you must be rich/sexy/combination of both? :-)

Nah, I was just kidding! That was excellent hospitality you received!
#51
| Loud Noisy Bird

Originally posted by: Digital Drifter... ... ...But hey, you seem to receiving full and complete attention wherever you went with people actually doing that stuff for you, you must be rich/sexy/combination of both? :-)

Nah, I was just kidding! That was excellent hospitality you received!

I wish, I wish, I wish ;) :) :D

I suspect that some of my friends are quite traditional.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#52
| Bulk Carrier

Originally posted by: Bengal Tigerwhen you have finished painting the best fantasy you can of madrasians and their burping and many other "frankly uncivilized" habits (mind you not customs



Ahem! Ahem! How about a little chat on Kolkata...i am sure...I can find a trainload of "uncivilized habits"...

The point is...this is no forum for harbouring personal hard feelings...
..so why carry it along...dump it somewhere.
...and I took the road less travelled.
#53
| Bulk Carrier

Originally posted by: Nick-HAlthough I have to admit to having seen Jethro Tull a long, long time ago.

Sounds like Chennai's the place for me then ;) :)



Chennai 's got a lot of Tull fans.
...and I took the road less travelled.
#54
| Maha Guru Member
Dear Bengal Tiger

The intent behind all ceremonies of hospitality is the same, to allow both host and guest to express their feelings of respect and happiness in the company of the other.Very important in courtship rituals also. Different countries, even different areas of the same country, different age groups, different ceremonies.

I wouldn't use the west as a benchmark of that kind of civilized behavior. Here older women miss and younger women, like my daughter are now begining to insist, enough of this informality. We want back a few of those little ceremonies that make us feel good, like men opening car doors for us. My daughter tells me that some of the young men she has put through her private course on appropriate social behavor have reported back to her that it works like a charm on other girls also.

In some little back country restaurants they do not have running water or a sink. I always enjoyed that sense of being cared for when my host or even a restaurant employee would pour water over my hands. Felt pretty much the way it feels when I am with a man who has enough of that old fashioned sense of courtesy to open the car door for me.

Feeding the crows, never encountered that one, but it feels good also. Respect and value for all of nature.Very civilized.
http://indibliss.blogspot.com/
#55
| Loud Noisy Bird

Originally posted by: rangssChennai 's got a lot of Tull fans.

I've already met a Crosby, Stills, etc fan there...
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#56
| ooh I get to be creative and put something here!
This thread is really funny. :D Including all the misconstrutions and lack of misconstrutions (hm... I think I like that word, has a nice ring to it) and Tull. Actually I think a lot can be said for tone.. that even though the words of one's post say one thing, the underlying feeling is louder. ... and I think in general people are pretty accurate about not misconstruing that...

Oh and B-T... you can't have the last word if you leave early. ;-)
#57
| Loud Noisy Bird
Thank you SS for your irrepresible good humour :D
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#58
| Bulk Carrier

Originally posted by: Nick-HI wasn't thinking so much of the visit to the nearby sink as those occasions on which one gets water poured over one's hands by ones host, or might be expected to do same for a guest



I think I get it...well nothing elaborate here either. Your host offers to pour water while you wash...a polite gesture....to help you wash better. You can reciprocate it to your host or do it with a guest....this time you are reciprocating the politeness.

I have come across this situation many times during ritual family feasts. Being a city boy, I never gave much thought to these things, andmy dad would always give me a gentle nudge and ask me to help the elderly guest/host wash his hands.

Hey relax...like a said. Let us not make it a Japanese Tea Ritual.
...and I took the road less travelled.
#59
| Member
[rockon] I bet you anything Eddie Vedder's wife belches when she's done eating.
#60
| Maha Guru Member
Hi rangss

This hand washing in public is something westerners do notice about India because we have a great need to hide all types of bodily maintenance procedures. For instance, no one in the west would wash hands before or after a meal out in public, it would always be done in private behind a closed door. No one would ever offer to help another with this kind of activity unless the one being helped was physically challenged and then their caregiver would go into the private room with them to assist them. There is none of that business of rinsing out the mouth and spitting into the street or a sink. Brushing of teeth in train corridors or pouring water over oneself, one's child or one's cow beside a community well just isn't the done thing. Of all those activities only washing the cow in public would be acceptable, animals are not perceived as needing
privacy for these kinds of activities. I suspect it comes out of that almost pathological medieval Christian hatred of the body that underlies all western civilization and that modern westerners challange with body revealing modes of attire. We would still never scratch where it itches in public.

It's a minor thing but illustrates how small things can define cultural differences. India is changing though. I noticed in the Bangelore bus station restaurant a sign requesting that customers not spit in the hand-washing sink. Probably got more to do with disease prevention than social taboos I suspect.

Another thing that westerners notice about India is that men will hold hands with other men. The only kind of physical contact non-homosexual men will accept with each other in the west are bone crushing handshakes or hearty thumps on the back or biceps. None of this gentle handholding during an intensely personal conversation that I noticed so many Indian men engage in. Just would not be done between straight men for fear observers would assume they were gay.

It's not the Japanese tea ceremony, but perhaps to the Japanese the tea ceremony is also just the way things are done here and no big deal.
http://indibliss.blogspot.com/