Nutritious grains in what regional cuisine?

#1 Jul 5th, 2016, 16:52
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  • Peterjones is offline
#1
I am on the wrong continent

I don't eat rice but once or twice a week. As much as I like the *taste* of basmati I prefer the texture, colour and nutrition of brown, red and even black rices.

Even better for my tastes, I am big on other whole grains. I love quinoa, but being exported from South America, in S.E. Asia it costs like gold! Somebody mentioned amaranth. Ugh. Yucky texture.

My favourite grain in Canada is actually millet. Works in my rice cooker too. Funny, the millet I buy in China is very small. Canadian is much larger.

Is there any Indian cuisine that uses millet and non-rice grains, such as barley, a lot?

Has India caught up with the rest of the world in nutrition consciousness? I notice that in China and Thailand (but not in Malaysia and Vietnam) health food stores and low sugar prepared foods are a lot more popular than 20 years ago.
#2 Jul 5th, 2016, 17:22
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#2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peterjones View Post Is there any Indian cuisine that uses millet and non-rice grains, such as barley, a lot?
Millet is widely used in India, specially pearl millet. In fact, the variety of grains used in daily cooking in India was huge until wheat took over.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peterjones View Post Has India caught up with the rest of the world in nutrition consciousness?
Indian food had always been nutrition packed, but most people were not conscious about this fact. Every regional cuisine is a mix of proteins, carbs, vitamins etc. What India is catching up to the west is in bad food habits now.

Nutrition consciousnesses in west is more of a fad, and it is seen in India too now a day. One day something is good and everyone runs to grab it, soon something else takes its place. Quinoa too falls in this list, soon it will be forgotten.
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#3 Jul 5th, 2016, 17:47
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#3
See this thread devoted to Millet:

http://www.indiamike.com/india/india...millet-t65083/


In Gujarat and rajasthan, a daily staple is bajra millet. (even in London I have to have it at least once or twice a week).

Here are some bajra rotlas I'd made earlier


source


In parts of Maharashtra and the Western Ghats, naachni millet is very common and nutritious.

Jowar millet is common throughout India

Besan (chick pea flour) is non-glycaemic if that is important to you and available throughout India.
#4 Jul 5th, 2016, 18:10
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#4
Wonderful. Thank you.
#5 Jul 5th, 2016, 19:41
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#5
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Originally Posted by ViShVa View Post Here are some bajra rotlas I'd made earlier
Hats Off for actually making rotlas at home.
#6 Jul 5th, 2016, 20:01
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#6
They're traditionally made by hand, by patting and shaping the dough from one palm to the other, but I can't do that so I use a rolling pin. For that to work successfully (since bajra has no gluten) I have to add 10-20% wheat flour.
#7 Jul 5th, 2016, 21:07
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#7
Ragi is big in South Indian Cuisines. Also if you not like Basmati, you can find other Indian Varieties as well - for eg the fat rice they eat in Kerala - VERY different from Basamati.
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#8 Jul 6th, 2016, 00:12
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#8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peterjones View Post I am on the wrong continent

I don't eat rice but once or twice a week. As much as I like the *taste* of basmati I prefer the texture, colour and nutrition of brown, red and even black rices.
For nearly ten years I looked around this city for wholegrain brown rice. Now I can get it.

Probably, I'm in the wrong state to say that I find boiled white rice to be the most boring food stuff ever. Take rice, throw away flavour and nutrition, boil, eat in large quantities, get fat.
Quote:
Has India caught up with the rest of the world in nutrition consciousness?
I can't answer for "India" because it it so huge, and my knowledge is of a small corner of it, and incomplete even for that. I see an ever-increasing number of shops with the word "organic" on their sign boards. I've been in one or two, and found their proprietors to be sincere, but I suspect that some people use it like the words "government approved" on gift shops --- just for decoration. I suspect that there are no recognised standards for "organic."

But hey, I'd still be eating in greasy-spoon cafes if I were in London, so perhaps I'm not the person to expound on this. (Not that that stopped me!)
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#9 Jul 6th, 2016, 00:35
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#9
Quote:
Originally Posted by jituyadav View Post Indian food had always been nutrition packed, but most people were not conscious about this fact. Every regional cuisine is a mix of proteins, carbs, vitamins etc. What India is catching up to the west is in bad food habits now.
My late uncle, a nutritionist by profession and quite Swiss both in nationality and outlook, used to say that owing to their strong leaning towards vegetarianism, the Indians over the course of centuries had learned to work out that when certain individual foods were combined the end product often became a complete meal in itself supplying the body with the necessary amounts of protein, carbs etc.

One obvious example is daal-chawal. Rice by itself is just carbs, and daal by itself protein, but when the two are combined it becomes a complete and nourishing meal.

http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/bene...her-11619.html
#10 Jul 6th, 2016, 12:49
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#10
I am not a proponent of the 'gods taught us', so I find it *curious* this ingenuity of humanity that the potentizing effect of black pepper to curcuma, verified by scientific research, is exactly how most Indians (but not Bengalis) have been preparing curry for centuries. Apparently the curcumin in the blood stream goes up 20X with just a pinch of ground pepper corn to to fresh or powdered curcuma longum.

See nutritionfacts.org. Look up tumeric (maybe the Americans there spells it turmeric).
#11 Jul 7th, 2016, 05:38
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#11
Peppercorns have been used as a ingredient in Garam Masala, Which is added at the end of the cooking mostly in North India.
#12 Jul 7th, 2016, 23:33
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#12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peterjones View Post Has India caught up with the rest of the world in nutrition consciousness?
I guess you are referring to the fact brown rice isn't very popular? From my understanding this comes from Vedic influence that brown rice is hard to digest, and since you can only extract nutrients from what you can digest properly they preferred to use basmati rice for this reason, since it's light and easy to digest.

If you want to give it extra nutrition and texture you can make Kitchari, which is split yellow mung dal (moong dal) and basmati rice mixed in 2:1 ratio (two parts rice one part dal) It is soaked for at least one hour but preferably longer then cooked with spices. The ratio can be adjusted according to needs as can the texture depending how solid or liquid you want it to be. This is used as a 'building up' food in convalescence. Also very tasty!
#13 Jul 8th, 2016, 03:12
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#13
Quote:
you can only extract nutrients from what you can digest properly
White rice? What nutrients?




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#14 Jul 8th, 2016, 03:47
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#14

I love kitcheri

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevking1 View Post I guess you are referring to the fact brown rice isn't very popular? From my understanding this comes from Vedic influence that brown rice is hard to digest, and since you can only extract nutrients from what you can digest properly they preferred to use basmati rice for this reason, since it's light and easy to digest.

If you want to give it extra nutrition and texture you can make Kitchari, which is split yellow mung dal (moong dal) and basmati rice mixed in 2:1 ratio (two parts rice one part dal) It is soaked for at least one hour but preferably longer then cooked with spices. The ratio can be adjusted according to needs as can the texture depending how solid or liquid you want it to be. This is used as a 'building up' food in convalescence. Also very tasty!
Although I like it very much I have never been able to find it available in canteens or restaurants. Perhaps kitcheri is like tempeh (probiotic fermented soy beans) in Indonesia. It is *home* food.
#15 Jul 8th, 2016, 04:12
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#15
Is this what, in this corner of India is called Kitchidi? I'm really not sure if it is available in restaurants, and you could be right about it being home food.

If I recall correctly, we have a whole thread about it. I like it very much too.

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