Kind of Mangoes to make pickle with.

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#1 Apr 4th, 2014, 11:19
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#1
I sometime dabble in making mango pickles. I have tried making Punjabi style pickle and the dry kind with hing (Asafoetida). I have found the variety of green mangoes we get here in Sydney are too sweet even when they are unripe.
What kind of mangoes are used in India for making pickles. Once I know the variety, will try and source them in Australia or maybe grow a tree in my backyard.
Would be grateful for any advise.
Last edited by Govindpuri; Apr 6th, 2014 at 04:26..
#2 Apr 10th, 2014, 14:33
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#2
Don't have a clue, of the variety of mango used in pickles, Govind...
but mango madness season has begun

This is how the first batch is eaten ... chilli powder / black salt... then crunch!
Name:  Mango madness.jpg
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In the 'south' - the first raw mangoes are unlike the ones in Kolkata.
They're kinda HUGE, longish in shape and kinda yellowy inside -
as opposed to being roundish and stark white as in Bengal, and definitely more tangy.



Hopefully somebody'll come around to answer your queries.
:brishti
#3 Apr 10th, 2014, 15:30
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#3

Mango for pickle

The common type of pickles made in Andhra style call for real sour raw mangoes. These may be easier to find in Indian (or other South Asian) grocery shops, no matter where you live.

Feel the green mangos, they should be hard to touch. If they are even a little bit soft, they may be ripe or ripening on the inside.

Cutting such raw, green mangoes for making pickle is a challenge. You must cut them such that the shell does not detach from the flesh. I can only accomplish such a dissection with the big knife attached to a cutting board. Place the mango exactly in the groove in the cutting board and with one quick swoop cut it into half. Only the mango. Save the fingers. I am NOT kidding.

Do you add red chili powder for making the pickle? If so, you tend to get best results by drying the red chili and making the powder yourself (as opposed to buying readymade red chili powder).

Good luck.
Last edited by iseeking; Apr 10th, 2014 at 18:57..
#4 Apr 10th, 2014, 15:45
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#4
There is a special mango which is only used to make pickle. It does not get ripe and remains sour throughout.

To get these, you have to wait until end of July when they are at their best to be pickled. The size is average, colour dark green and the shape is roundish.
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#5 Apr 10th, 2014, 15:53
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#5
Was wondering when you'd be posting here, Jitu
Aare - give Govind the name of them mangoes, nah.



:brishti
#6 Apr 10th, 2014, 16:11
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#6
...the funny thing is that they are known as 'Achaar wale aam' or Pickle Mango's. If one goes shopping around mid July and later (not earlier), these will be the ones given by vendors.

I however think that they are local to north India and may not be finding any market outside of this region.
#7 Apr 10th, 2014, 18:59
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#7
In South India these sour acharwale mangoes are available during April - May. Wait till later at your own risk of not finding the right ones for pickling.
#8 Apr 10th, 2014, 19:25
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#8
Please note, each area uses different varieties of unripe mangoes to prepare pickles.

Randomly googled "varieties of mango to be used for pickles" and found interesting results.
#9 Apr 10th, 2014, 22:32
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#9
Any unripe mango can be turned into pickle, be it dusheri, alphanso or chausa etc.

However, for pickle, the best ones are either the variety I am talking about, or any other desi mango (mango's that are not from the cultivated group).
#10 Apr 10th, 2014, 23:12
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#10
Check dark green real sour hard raw mangoes. It can be availble any time. Rinse mangoes in water and then wait until dry. If you like to store for long time mangoes pickle should be in Oil. Sarson Oil in north India other can be use different one.
Best Regards,
#11 Apr 10th, 2014, 23:58
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#11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govindpuri View Post I sometime dabble in making mango pickles. I have tried making Punjabi style pickle .
Quote:
Originally Posted by jituyadav View Post There is a special mango which is only used to make pickle. It does not get ripe and remains sour throughout.

To get these, you have to wait until end of July when they are at their best to be pickled. The size is average, colour dark green and the shape is roundish.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brishti View Post Aare - give Govind the name of them mangoes, nah.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jituyadav View Post ...the funny thing is that they are known as 'Achaar wale aam' or Pickle Mango's. .
'Ram Kela' is the local name for 'Achaar wale aam' here in our area.
As Jitu has posted you will have to wait till Monsoon advent, available mostly after mid of July.
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#12 Apr 11th, 2014, 00:14
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#12
How about Hapus.?
#13 Apr 11th, 2014, 05:00
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#13
"Hapoos", aka Alphonso mangoes, are generally not used for pickling. I don't know whether or not a raw hapus mango would work and whether they don't use it because it is so expensive, or whether it is not astringent enough for pickling purposes.

In London we get small raw mangoes (about 5-7 cm long) as well as raw green ones about 10-15 cm at Indian grocers which are sold for pickling. Next time I go in I will ask them what they are called, though I doubt they will know it. I think that the larger ones are the "Rajapuri" mangoes.
#14 Apr 11th, 2014, 05:14
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#14
Thanks all for your advise. I think Ram Kela would be the best mango for pickling. Next step is to see if it is available in Australia.
#15 Apr 11th, 2014, 06:04
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#15
What kind of mango is not really important. It has to be green and should taste tart or tangy. The flesh should be crisp with mouth puckering sour taste. They are usually available in Indian stores, Thai, Vietnamese and Laotian stores. Click on the photo for a recipe.



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