Yeah, it's 'about' food, but (metaphorically), so much more . . .

#16 Mar 6th, 2015, 02:04
Join Date:
Jul 2008
Location:
boston
Posts:
599
  • Boston123 is offline
#16
[QUOTE=BholeBaba;1867749]Yea, I agree.

European/ Western food is dominated by meaty, creamy, and cheesy flavours;

My kids went through a phase where they had to order chicken makhani and matar paneer, at any Indian restaurant.

But my friends tell me that Indian food has not quite become the 'comfort food' that Chinese food has, because there are not many dishes with beef or pork. Meat choices are limited to chicken or lamb in some cases, while Fish, scallops or shrimp can be overwhelmed with Indian spices.

They do appreciate how a mild dose of indian spices can make any vegetable come alive, and some of my friends who had sworn off vegetables when growing up, are returning to veggies( Aloo Gobi, Beans Thuvaran,Baaingan bharta...)
#17 Mar 6th, 2015, 06:57
Join Date:
Mar 2012
Location:
Sydney, Australia
Posts:
9,846
  • Govindpuri is offline
#17
No one does vegetarian like Indian food.
#18 Mar 6th, 2015, 08:46
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
Illinois-New Mexico-India
Posts:
11,861
  • Sama is offline
#18
Quote:
Originally Posted by BholeBaba View Post Now you know why so many of us Indians find western food to be so bland tasting.
there are Americans who find American food bland.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BholeBaba View Post European/ Western food is dominated by meaty, creamy, and cheesy flavours;
which is everything I never eat. lucky for me I grew up in an ethnic neighborhood and did not grow up eating shit on a shingle. you can google that one.

ever traveled around Mexico and tasted different cuisines? it is very similar to Indian food, IMO. "Mexican" food in the West is not what is served in Mexico.

if I am out with someone who doesn't dig spice, it's usually the last time I go out to dinner with them.
My India Photos, 2005-2017
"...by any means necessary." Malcolm X
#19 Mar 6th, 2015, 17:54
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
69,487
  • Nick-H is offline
#19
Too much spice is the equivalent of boiling the life out of everything like Brits did in the 1950s. Soggy cabbage, anybody? And is soggy cabbage improved by the addition of vast amounts of chilli? Nope.
#20 Mar 6th, 2015, 20:07
Join Date:
Aug 2006
Location:
Homeless
Posts:
19,557
  • nycank is offline
#20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govindpuri View Post No one does vegetarian like Indian food.
Turks ? 53 ways to do a baigan ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by NonIndianResident View Post Now now, some quote above says "compare that to the 20 Indian restaurants in the Big Apple in the early 1980s."

I used to go to Indian restaurants on E 6th street in the early 80s, and there were probably 20 Indian restaurants on that block alone, and must have been more scattered through the city.




*Well, people in the know said they were all run by Bangladeshis, I don't know.

C'mon NYCank, have you been a NYer long enough to remember E6th?
I don't pay too much weight to Washington Post & D.C in some areas - Food is one of them. By early '80s, New York had two indian food ghettos - Lexington and 6th St between 1&2 Ave. Then there was Queens, NY which had Roosvelt Ave area with all things Indian/Bangladeshi/
#21 Mar 7th, 2015, 05:36
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
Illinois-New Mexico-India
Posts:
11,861
  • Sama is offline
#21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post Too much spice is the equivalent of boiling the life out of everything like Brits did in the 1950s
knowing how to spice food is like great sex: it's very nuanced and more doesn't make it better.
#22 Mar 7th, 2015, 05:47
Join Date:
Jan 2010
Location:
London (UK) (Current) & Pali Hill, Bombay (IN)
Posts:
8,839
  • ViShVa is offline
#22
A beautifully spiced dish, veg or non-veg, is not necessarily chilli spicy. I really like Thomasina Meir's chain of Mexican in the UK, called Wahaca. And I also like Cafe Pacifico's version of Tex-Mex. Both so very different and equally good.
#23 Mar 7th, 2015, 05:57
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
Illinois-New Mexico-India
Posts:
11,861
  • Sama is offline
#23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ViShVa View Post A beautifully spiced dish, veg or non-veg, is not necessarily chilli spicy..
exactly. too much spice -- as in burning your tongue off -- just tells me the person does not know how to cook that well.
#24 Mar 7th, 2015, 06:15
Join Date:
Aug 2003
Location:
In the Middle of Nowhere, The Center of Everything
Posts:
2,755
Send a message via Yahoo to Darmabum
  • Darmabum is offline
#24
"Spice" . . . kind of an ambiguous word. While there is certainly spicy-hot, my love of Indian food stems from the savory aspects of spice. I see so many posts about people not liking "spicy" food, thinking all the while - perhaps - that spice is referring to temperature.
Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate; our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure - Marianne Williamson
#25 Mar 7th, 2015, 06:20
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
Illinois-New Mexico-India
Posts:
11,861
  • Sama is offline
#25
true. there's a difference between spice and heat.

In doing my own genetic/DNA research I learned that a person's taste is also in their DNA. for real. not that they can't learn to love a certain taste tho.
#26 Mar 7th, 2015, 06:30
Join Date:
Jan 2010
Location:
London (UK) (Current) & Pali Hill, Bombay (IN)
Posts:
8,839
  • ViShVa is offline
#26
I'm an acquired taste, like Guinness. Most people go "ugh!"
#27 Mar 7th, 2015, 15:03
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
69,487
  • Nick-H is offline
#27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sama View Post exactly. too much spice -- as in burning your tongue off -- just tells me the person does not know how to cook that well.
As a friend of mine says: "I can't see the point in food that hurts." Oddly, she is an Andhra lady, and they are renowned for did-you-want-any-food-with-your-chilly food that hurts.
#28 May 3rd, 2016, 17:05
Join Date:
May 2016
Location:
Chandigarh
Posts:
8
  • Ruth90 is offline
#28
I find this topic particularly interesting because I am half Indian and half British so I have grown up eating a variety of different foods from both western and Indian cultures.
I think both cultures have their food merits. Western cuisine can be very robust and hearty and really embraces the concept of salt and savoury. On the other hand it can be also be extremely delicate and fresh, and it embraces flavours and techniques from all over the world which can make it very exciting. That being said because of the fast food industry western food can often be dubbed as fatty, greasy, heavy and unhealthy. Indian and Asian cultures tend to use more humble ingredients and therefore use a lot of spices and strong sauces to make something basic like rice or potato more exciting. There is also more of a culture of preserving and pickling foods which again brings out stronger flavours that western pallets may not be used to. What I love about my mixed heritage is that I have been able to see how different cultures mix. I therefore cook a lot of what would be considered western food but I always add some Indian spice to make the flavours more complex.
#29 May 3rd, 2016, 17:47
Join Date:
Aug 2006
Location:
hyderabad/Kolkata
Posts:
5,020
  • nayan is offline
#29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth90 View Post Indian and Asian cultures tend to use more humble ingredients and therefore use a lot of spices and strong sauces to make something basic like rice or potato more exciting.
I will not even comment about "Asian cultures" which is so diverse in scope....
Even in India - the diversity of cooking styles and ingredients is enormous.
Unless you are talking of extreme climates like ladakh or thar desert, nowhere are the ingredients humble/limited.
All kinds of grains, pulses, vegetables, fruits, meats and fish are used. Being a mostly tropical country - produce grows all through the year.

Spices are used because spices (mostly)grow here
#30 May 3rd, 2016, 18:15
Join Date:
May 2016
Location:
Chandigarh
Posts:
8
  • Ruth90 is offline
#30
I was also going to add myself that what people eat is all very relative to the food that is grown in their country but you beat me to it! And what I meant my 'humble' is more in the sense that in Asian cultures there is more of a humble approach to cooking because there is a sense of making food last, making it go further (using all of the animal for instance). Maybe I am generalising!

Similar Threads

Title, Username, & Date Last Post Replies Views Forum
Indian food vs Pakistani food Jul 22nd, 2012 12:13 57 27011 Delhi
YEAH--successfully booked tkts from Jaipur to Delhi Jun 9th, 2008 17:18 7 1407 Indian Railways
my dream trip is booked----yeah baby Jan 3rd, 2006 06:16 1 1340 Chai and Chat
Home food vs Restaurant food. why??? May 7th, 2005 22:53 2 5549 Indian Cooking and Cuisine


Posting Rules

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Forum Rules»
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2
© IndiaMike.com 2018
Page Load Success