Zippr - the new smart address
Jean-Philipe
India > India Travel - Getting There and Around > India Travel > India Maps
#1
| a.k.a. IndiaJP

Zippr - the new smart address

How many times have you had to ask or give directions to some location? How much time have those conversations wasted? How many times have you got lost trying to follow someone's directions?

Zippr is a new concept: the smart address. Download the app or go to their web page zip.pr and create or look up a Zippr code.

Hyderabad is the first city-wide implementation in India. Soon every address in Hyderabad will have its own Zippr code. Instead of a complicated address and directions, just send the Zippr code by email or sms. Useful for couriers, delivery services, emergencies, and more.

For example, I have scheduled a Chennai Meetup in February. To give the directions to the venue, all I have to do is include a link with the Zippr code, and anyone with a smartphone, tablet or computer can easily find it.
It's all part of the adventure of travelling! cool:

indiajp.blogspot.in

11 Replies

#2
| Senior Member
Glympse offers the same functionality. Only in this case you can send your location via SMS as well. Perfect for situations where you don't have an internet connection (off the beaten trail) . Available for IOS, Android and laggards like me who use a Windows phone :)
"I listen to the tramp, tramp of my feet, and wonder where I was going, and why I was going."
#3
| Loud Noisy Bird
If one wants a difficult to remember string of numbers, there has always been lat and long, and it can be fed into most map/nav application.

Personally, I find a "complicated address" easier to remember, and it also has the advantage that, once one gets near by, people are likely to know it.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#4
| Member

Originally posted by: Nick-H View Post

Personally, I find a "complicated address" easier to remember, and it also has the advantage that, once one gets near by, people are likely to know it.

:ThumbsUp
#5
| a.k.a. IndiaJP

Originally posted by: Nick-H View Post

If one wants a difficult to remember string of numbers, there has always been lat and long, and it can be fed into most map/nav application.

Personally, I find a "complicated address" easier to remember, and it also has the advantage that, once one gets near by, people are likely to know it.


Zippr of course uses latitude and longitude to generate its codes, but I don't think anyone uses them day to day to specify addresses. A Zippr'd address is condensed to a four-letter-four-digit code which can easily be sent to the intended recipient by email, Whatsapp, SMS, etc.

You have the option to personalize the code to a more readily remembered four-letter-four-digit combination.

And of course once you have the code, it doesn't matter if people nearby know the location sought because you don't need to ask them. Just consult the map on your smartphone or tablet.
It's all part of the adventure of travelling! cool:

indiajp.blogspot.in
#6
| Loud Noisy Bird
A Zippr'd address is condensed to a four-letter-four-digit code which can easily be sent to the intended recipient by email, Whatsapp, SMS, etc.


That is an improvement on the many digits required for doorstep accuracy with latitude and longitude.

And of course once you have the code, it doesn't matter if people nearby know the location sought because you don't need to ask them. Just consult the map on your smartphone or tablet.


That one is a bit of a maybe. A couple of weeks ago, we visited an NGO, known to Google, and with its position clearly marked on Google Maps. The position was not accurate. Close, but not close enough.

On the whole, though, between Google and Sygic, navigation/mapping apps certainly do usually get me exactly where I want to go.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#7
| Survivor

Originally posted by: Jean-Philipe View Post

How many times have you had to ask or give directions to some location? How much time have those conversations wasted? How many times have you got lost trying to follow someone's directions?

Zippr is a new concept: the smart address. Download the app or go to their web page zip.pr and create or look up a Zippr code.

Hyderabad is the first city-wide implementation in India. Soon every address in Hyderabad will have its own Zippr code. Instead of a complicated address and directions, just send the Zippr code by email or sms. Useful for couriers, delivery services, emergencies, and more.

For example, I have scheduled a Chennai Meetup in February. To give the directions to the venue, all I have to do is include a link with the Zippr code, and anyone with a smartphone, tablet or computer can easily find it.


Are you buying or selling?

:Beer:Beer:Beer
GoanGoan......here & there:unsure:..Goacool:
#8
| a.k.a. IndiaJP

Originally posted by: Nick-H View Post

That one is a bit of a maybe. A couple of weeks ago, we visited an NGO, known to Google, and with its position clearly marked on Google Maps. The position was not accurate. Close, but not close enough.

On the whole, though, between Google and Sygic, navigation/mapping apps certainly do usually get me exactly where I want to go.


The point of the Zippr code is that is is custom created by someone who KNOWS where it should point to on the map. For example, your house is not going to be in Google maps' database. But you can personally create a Zippr which will pinpoint its location precisely. Then give someone you want to invite to tea (hint hint) your Zippr code instead of "three km south of Tidel Park on OMR, turn left at the showroom, cross the canal, 2 blocks, turn right, then it's next to the temple" or whatever.
It's all part of the adventure of travelling! cool:

indiajp.blogspot.in
#9
| Member

Originally posted by: Jean-Philipe View Post

And of course once you have the code, it doesn't matter if people nearby know the location sought because you don't need to ask them. Just consult the map on your smartphone or tablet.


Originally posted by: Nick-H View Post


That one is a bit of a maybe. A couple of weeks ago, we visited an NGO, known to Google, and with its position clearly marked on Google Maps. The position was not accurate. Close, but not close enough.

One time in the city, a foreign tourist in an auto was trying to find a GH in a particular road. Had the location pat on GMaps on his smartphone. But - he spoke no Hindi, the driver spoke no English, nuff said :renske:. The driver managed to get to the next road parallel, where they found me :).
Driver to me in Hindi - Where is this address?
Me and tourist conversing in English and checking his phone - Nail the location correctly.
Me to driver in Hindi - Next road, so far down, left side. :cool:

Of course, all these new apps are only good for big cities, at least for now. They haven't a hope in hell of succeeding in e.g. the hills, where many secondary or tertiary roads are either not shown or wrongly shown on existing online maps. Place names missing, or incorrect ..... I could go on.

Originally posted by: Jean-Philipe View Post

The point of the Zippr code is that is is custom created by someone who KNOWS where it should point to on the map. For example, your house is not going to be in Google maps' database. But you can personally create a Zippr which will pinpoint its location precisely. Then give someone you want to invite to tea (hint hint) your Zippr code instead of "three km south of Tidel Park on OMR, turn left at the showroom, cross the canal, 2 blocks, turn right, then it's next to the temple" or whatever.

Valid point.
But as I said, if the roads aren't even correctly shown, we're back to "three km south of Tidel Park on OMR, turn left at the showroom, cross the canal, 2 blocks, turn right, then it's next to the temple". :cool:
#10
| a.k.a. IndiaJP

Originally posted by: goangoangone View Post

Are you buying or selling?


It's free. I'm proselytizing because I think it's a brilliant idea.
It's all part of the adventure of travelling! cool:

indiajp.blogspot.in
#11
| Loud Noisy Bird
It is a good idea. On the other hand, I don't need to send you directions, I can send you a Google Maps position or even a URL, and Google offers me the chance to make a short URL instead of the native maps link which is very long. I think they are solving a problem which has been solved already.

My other problem with this is that I already have two map/nav applications that I use, and I don't want a third. This is especially the case as I have a phone which does not have expandable storage (memory card) option.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#12
| a.k.a. IndiaJP
Yesterday I had a perfect real-life example of the value of Zippr codes. For the last several months a friend and I have been planning a road trip to Goa for the beginning of December. We booked a guest house over the internet, found its location on Google maps, and assumed we could readily find it using the GPS on my tablet.

But with road construction in process, and the street we wanted blocked, we had to circle through back lanes to get there, only to find a huge crater precisely where the map showed the guest house should be. We called the guest house for directions (which we should have done in the first place) and found that it was actually about three kilometers away. They have been trying to get the location corrected but to no avail. After several phone calls as we drove there, we finally found the manager waiting for us at the side of the road to escort us the last few hundred meters.

See for yourself. Use Google maps and search for La Blanche Guest House, Calangute, Goa. Then look up the Zippr code I created after we arrived, at
http://zip.pr/in/RMZY9102
Quite a difference in location!

If we had had the Zippr code in advance, it would have saved a frustrating hour of battling traffic and construction in Calangute at the end of an eight-hour drive.

As the Monkees sang, "I'm a believer."
It's all part of the adventure of travelling! cool:

indiajp.blogspot.in

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