Tracing my roots
Prithviraj
India > India Travel - Getting There and Around > India Travel > India Maps
#1
| Member

Tracing my roots

Hello everybody! Surfing on net to trace my roots, I came across this site. I would like some help as I want to know more about my origins. Currently I have done some researches which show that my forefather came from MUTHOLYA(Village name) ARRAH(Zillah) GHOINPORE(Pergunnah).

Now, the thing is that I'm currently in INDIA and would like to seize this opportunity to go and meet any relative living out there but I can't figure out how to proceed for I need lots of things especially pertaining to their address. I really need a helping hand here and would appreciate you guys' help immensely!

Thank You! :D

13 Replies

#2
| In charge, navel affairs
how to proceed


umm, not sure what you are asking here. Do you want help in locating the village? If so, you will have to give us whatever snippets of information you have. For eg, where did your forefathers go? (Slave labour and others were taken by the British to some places. Migrants, on the other hand, could go anywhere).

Also whatever you know about language spoken by them, stories, way of dressing.....

That 'Pergunnah' or Pargana is indicative of areas ruled by the Muslim kings- but not exclusively. Depends when they went, even the British used that system for awhile. All it probably indicates they lived in north- central or parts of eastern India.

Maybe the village name will ring a bell with somebody.
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#3
| Member
Actually they were taken as slaves to Mauritius. The aforementioned details have been gathered in Mauritius itself and the officials informed me that they cannot help me any further. Now I need to reach the roots. Currently, I'm trying to locate the exact place where the village might be because there seem to be many spelling mistakes in the various village names written by the British at that time. If somebody could shed some light on the issue, it would be very nice! :D

Thank You! :D
#4
| In charge, navel affairs
Any idea when and where they ended up? This is because Mauritius was the clearing house for slaves who were then dispersed to British colonies around the world.

Many of these were from central-eastern India (Bihar a big source, but not the only one, also Eastern UP- if it helps with your search). They were taken from Calcutta and Kariakal mainly (Tamilnadu today) by sea. If the dialect spoken at home by anybody is akin to Bhojpuri or such, that is where I would concentrate.
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#5
| Hati Hati
ARRAH(Zillah)

This is in Bihar(Bhojpur district).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arrah
#6
| retired
I'm no expert and could be completely wrong here......

Then I searched some 1950's very detailed maps, I searched these because they often have the old names that the British used, but I found nothing anywhere near Ara (Arrah)

I searched http://bhojpur.bih.nic.in/ looking for schools, in the past I've found this a great way to find villages, I couldn't find Mutholya, but there's a small chance the name is now Muhalla, and this is an area just north east of Ara railway station. (look in top right of map, Miki Muhalla, Tari Muhalla, and Gola Muhalla)











I hope this isn't getting you off track.
#7
| Member
Capt_Mahjan, Thank You mate! Actually Bhojpuri is the dialect my grand mother still uses. I guess, we are on the right track and they must have come from Bihar itself. And Steven_Ber, Thank You a lot mate! :D You tried really hard to help me here. Really appreciate it! :D Even you got stuck the same place I did. Finding the village! :P This is why I'm still confused about the village's name. For instance, at that time the British did write LALGUNJ as LOLLGUNJE or so on paper. So, I'm trying to find out which village they were trying to mention on paper in my case. This is the whole issue! :P But, as you said, Muholla seems to be the place! :D Any idea of a "Ara White Page' to just get some addresses or is there any such place in Bihar where the records are kept?
#8
| In charge, navel affairs
First of all, don't ask how I found out on google but there is an Ara in West Bengal (Purulia) too.

If Bhojpuri is spoken at home then it can't be that one- unless they were Bengalis originally. (Your surname will give you a very good clue. Many Indian origin people I have met in the Caribbean, for eg, have Bihari sounding surnames, albeit altered a bit)

The village (your Mutholya) may be Mathaulia in Arrah, Bhojpur, Bihar- about 1500 population today. Other details in this link

http://www.allaboutbihar.com/distric...ia_3090300.php

As you will see from that link left hand panel, that is a very useful site for Bihar districts etc.

PS
Muholla seems to be the place

Dunno, Muholla (if pronounced muhalla) means, loosely, 'neighbourhood'.
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#9
| Omnipresent
#10
| In charge, navel affairs
Interesting that in aarosh's first link, it has been spelt (on the right) Mathwaliya
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#11
| Member
Guys! In less than 24 hours you gave me a real ray of light! :D Thank You! At least now I have a starting point! :D Next step will be going there and trying to meet my relatives! :D:D Thank You! :D
#12
| Omnipresent
Interestingly if I search for Mathwaliya Arrah on Google, I see there is Orkut group consisting of 4 members.
#13
| Senior Member
Hi prithviraj
Arrah was in sahabad district in Bihar. Actually it has been divided in two districts now _Bhojpur and Rohtas. Arrah is the district headquarter of Bhojpur. Even spelling has been changed to Ara. Popularly people used to say that they are from arrah district (zila) , actually it was sahabad district now known as bhojpur. This is all the information I have.
#14
| Senior Member
Totally off topic, really, but Amitav Ghosh's ongoing and really wonderful Ibis trilogy involves a Bhojpuri-speaking couple who end up in Mauritius as indentured laborers. They're very much central to Sea of Poppies, the first of the set. It may be of real personal interest to you....

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