Retired in India and living on USA social security pension


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#16 Jan 25th, 2017, 23:15
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#16
Seems to me that Salima lives pretty much as a local, so being on or off a tourist track doesn't matter. There's a limit to how much one wants to do the same tourist stuff anyway. Salima has an advantage over me in living close to a lot more natural beauty than I do. Otherwise, we do our local-town stuff in our local towns. She also has the advantage (I think?) of speaking the local language and looking (?) more local than I do.

It's hard to understand, even for those who have regularly spent months in India (or anywhere else other than their previous home) that, after so many years, it is our normal, our home, our reference point.

Even I didn't appreciate this so much until I discovered, in 2015, that I am a foreigner in London!

What do we do in India? We live here. We just live here. To some that might include climbing mountains, to others it might include going to hundreds of concerts. But it's just what we do, just like it is what some of the people around us do.

Do I get bored? No more often than I would anywhere. I have always liked sitting around my own home, anyway.
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#17 Jan 26th, 2017, 00:02
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#17
But you have a significant other Nick so your not alone. Plus I imagine your music passion and living in a big city give you lot's to do.
"Travel is fatal to prejudice,bigotry and narrow-mindedness" Mark Twain
#18 Jan 26th, 2017, 00:34
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I have to say I admire people who manage living almost -in my view- like ascetics. I see this rural life thing like an abstract ideal but it's not for me. I'm the sort who can conceptually wax lyrical about spending 2 days and a night on a houseboat in the backwaters, reading a book but if I dare actually set foot on one then after one hour I'm ready to jump into the water because the bloody boat doesn't go fast enough, the landscape is beautiful but constant, I hear the whine of a mosquito that's not supposed to be present in my concept, the sun on the pages of my book is just a bit too harsh, I forgot bringing my favourite cigar brand, wireless connection drops off all the time etc etc.

After all my travelling as an expat I'm not too sure I have a place that I can call home, just a collection of places where my wife and I lived, each with advantages and disadvantages, people who become friends, then move on to the next posting. You visit a spot, then notice differences vs the previous time. One thing's for sure: when I retire I want a large city, a major airport close by and a hot, preferably dry climate. Maybe Delhi after all. But no, that would mean marrying an Indian to get an OCI, my wife might object.
"It is preferable to have a criminal for a servant rather than a fool because a criminal's actions are predictable and you can protect yourself against them, whereas there is no telling what a fool's next move will be.
#19 Jan 26th, 2017, 00:47
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#19
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Originally Posted by salima View Post do you have part b on your medicare and is the deduction the same as what you would be paying for it? i never bought part b knowing that when i left usa i would not be spending much time there ever again.

hey, my little brother lives in austin!
Yes, I have Part (b), and Yes deduction is same as paying cash for me. However, one cannot join Part (b) anytime after a specified window in time without incurring prohibitive fine and other cost. So, you cannot join Part (b) during your visits here. You can always buy costly health insurance!

Healthcare is very expensive, extremely expensive even with insurance. So, Salima, a visit to US is very risky or expensive (if you buy health insurance) for you. At any rate, you are always welcome to visit this beautiful Austin area. Healthcare is relatively cheaper in India for someone with sufficient amount (?) of US dollars via pension or social security income. You should be able to purchase top flight healthcare in India.

Enjoyed reading up your story, continue if you may.
#20 Jan 26th, 2017, 06:23
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#20
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Originally Posted by dillichaat View Post I have to say I admire people who manage living almost -in my view- like ascetics.
So do I. And it takes something special to do this far from your comfort zone, like salima has done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dillichaat View Post After all my travelling as an expat I'm not too sure I have a place that I can call home, just a collection of places where my wife and I lived
Me too. In my case, besides being at sea for much of my working life and working abroad, I grew up all over India after my parents fled their ancestral 'home' in what is now Pakistan during Partition. So now home is wherever I live.

I think a dream retirement is like a dream house. Nice to think about, but usually pretty impractical.
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#21 Jan 26th, 2017, 10:21
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#21
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Originally Posted by salima View Post as far as i know, i am still able to use medicare if i am ill or injured in america, but it owuld only be the hospital insurance (part a) which is given to every usa citizen over 65 (i think 65). i never bought part b, and i assume that is the part they would deduct from social security benefits. nothing has ever been deducted from mine and when i initially came to india i was not yet eligible for social security.

and no, i never bought health insurance here, i am more worried about having none were i to visit usa. i feel that the cost of healthcare here is low enough that i would be able to afford whatever catastrophe might befall me. considering my age, there are a lot of surgeries and treatments that i would refuse anyway and just let nature take its course.
Thanks..

I believe you can buy health insurance in India, before visiting the US. Hopefully that will supplement the Medicare coverage.

I am very curious how you came to choose Ratlam( and Indore before that) to settle down? I recall Ratlam as a midnight halt on the Frontier mail, between Delhi and Mumbai. I have heard of folks returning from the US living in the major metros, and also cities such as chandigarh, Jaipur, Pune... among others, but Ratlam is a first for me.
#22 Jan 26th, 2017, 10:39
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#22
Yeah, in the US everyone (Incl yours truly) seems to be on a perpetual treadmill, putting away money for their retirement, as all actuaries advise tell them they risk outliving their savings.
But just last week a work colleague died at 62, not having smelt the roses even for a day. Yes, your family will get a lump sum or some kind of annuity, but id be really pi...d off knowing I was going to die before getting to receive some of what I put away, or paid towards , all my life.
There was a movie with Queen Latifa where she was diagnosed with a terminal illness, so she set about spending her savings on her passion.... learning to cook (and eat) at a fancy Swiss culinary school. Except in the end, someone found the test results were incorrect, and she was going to live after all... after she had spent almost all her money.but she did find her passion, and opened her own fancy restaurant.
#23 Jan 26th, 2017, 10:39
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#23
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Originally Posted by Boston123 View Post Thanks..

I believe you can buy health insurance in India, before visiting the US. Hopefully that will supplement the Medicare coverage.

I am very curious how you came to choose Ratlam( and Indore before that) to settle down? I recall Ratlam as a midnight halt on the Frontier mail, between Delhi and Mumbai. I have heard of folks returning from the US living in the major metros, and also cities such as chandigarh, Jaipur, Pune... among others, but Ratlam is a first for me.
that is too long story actually and out of place in this thread i think. any idea where else i could post it?
#24 Jan 26th, 2017, 10:42
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#24
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Originally Posted by capt_mahajan View Post So do I. And it takes something special to do this far from your comfort zone, like salima has done.



Me too. In my case, besides being at sea for much of my working life and working abroad, I grew up all over India after my parents fled their ancestral 'home' in what is now Pakistan during Partition. So now home is wherever I live.

I think a dream retirement is like a dream house. Nice to think about, but usually pretty impractical.
i am very fortunate. i remember when i was leaving work through early retirement, one of my friends said she never really knew anyone who was living their dream before. i just made the decision, sold all my things, signed over the house to my son and left. never regretted it for one second.

india IS my dream come true.
#25 Jan 26th, 2017, 10:50
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#25
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Originally Posted by ananda2193 View Post Interesting lifestyle the past 13-14 years. You've chosen some off the tourist trail places to live. You don't get bored?

btw in 2003 $1 US=50 rs
even the locals here ask me all the time-what do you do all day?

i live alone but i like that. i do my own work, and there is a lot more work to do in india than there ever was in usa. i cook my own food, walk to and from bazaars for shopping, use the internet for researching whatever i happen to currently be involved in, i have already painted two flats here by myself since i love to do that, even painted the inside of the boundary wall to the garden downstairs. i go and sweep the roof when it is covered with leaves so they dont clog the drain and cause a leak in my roof. i am a workaholic i suppose, i am most happy when i am working.

i have some social life as i said, i spend time with friends i have made over the years besides the store owners, there are two families who will claim me as a member.

it is not the way most people would choose to live, and i could do it anywhere, but i wouldnt be as happy doing it there as i am here.
#26 Jan 26th, 2017, 11:20
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#26

healthcare in india

Quote:
Originally Posted by professorm View Post Yes, I have Part (b), and Yes deduction is same as paying cash for me. However, one cannot join Part (b) anytime after a specified window in time without incurring prohibitive fine and other cost. So, you cannot join Part (b) during your visits here. You can always buy costly health insurance!

Healthcare is very expensive, extremely expensive even with insurance. So, Salima, a visit to US is very risky or expensive (if you buy health insurance) for you. At any rate, you are always welcome to visit this beautiful Austin area. Healthcare is relatively cheaper in India for someone with sufficient amount (?) of US dollars via pension or social security income. You should be able to purchase top flight healthcare in India.

Enjoyed reading up your story, continue if you may.
i have had a taste of five star healthcare here as a matter of fact. i stayed in fortis in delhi for a week with a girl from the uk who was just here and alone and afraid, and a member of this forum too. but i didnt think it was necessary for me, i just have a different mindset on lifestyle. i had to go find the staff so i could have a good cup of tea! do you believe they used tea bags for the patients? i mean, tea bags?

so i chose to have my eyes operated on in ratlam. yes, it is a little dirtier here, but people still die of infections and accidents in the most upscale hospitals there are, it cant be totally eradicated. hospitals are full of sick people and germs, what do you expect?

so i have a phobia about things in my eyes and i couldnt even handle eye drops. i have to make a long story short here, but i went through the surgery kicking and screaming literally, having to have my hands held down and my legs tied (at my bidding) but the doctor kept on going, he must have had nerves of steel. i came out of it with a bruised and swollen eye, had a longer time recovering, all due to my own behavior (you are not supposed to move, not even talk). but the eye turned out great. first off i told them one eye is good enough, i dont want another operation. but when i realized how good i could see, i did it. next time i was prepared-took some xanax and no problem.

but my point is that in usa they would have just thrown me out, could not have dealt with such an unruly patient. that is how i know i belong here. well that is not how i know, but it is one of my proofs.

locals here are afraid to go to the government hospitals, but to be fair i think they are adequate. they were not intended for everybody. they can deal with the most common of illnesses and injuries that will come to them. and they have to put up with whole families coming after them and stoning or thrashing them when the outcome is not as they expected. they do have a worse time because the locals wait til the very last minute and often go when they are way beyond help.

i have been to government hospitals, for instance one of my 'families' are from a farm rural area, having come to ratlam for work when the farm isnt doing good, and i was there for the birth of a child. i was also with them for the birth of another child at a private hospital which i felt was necessary due to the fact that the mother-to-be had a severe kidney infection and was on a tough course of antibiotics. it was due to kidney stones and it was too late in the pregnancy by the time it was discovered to operate (i had taken her to two other private places first). her hemoglobin was way down and it was a miracle she survived the birth of her second child (this was number three). so both were appropriate due to the circumstances and served well. after number three she recovered beautifully and then it was number four that we went to the government hospital-she is the last.

also i was with them for the kidney surgery. she had a large abcess, most likely had this going on during the second delivery but i was not available then and they were on their own. the clinic was run by a man who was a urology specialist and his wife was the gynacologist. i cant remember any more what the surgery cost, but the delivery was 30,000 rs which isnt bad considering the problems.

so it is not necessary to use foreign or tourist facilities, if you dont mind seeing mice running across the tray tables by the side of the bed. well, you probably do, it is all a matter of taste.

if you go back to 2003 in the archives you will find a salima, that is me. by now i could write volumes of my life here, but i write a lot. where to post it? doing my best to use appropriate forums and hope it will give someone an idea what it is like to live with the locals...as the locals. i AM a local!
#27 Jan 26th, 2017, 13:56
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#27
Yes, Salima, would love to read more of your story. Mine is not nearly so interesting, and, being very far from a workaholic, it is much lazier.

I don't do 5* hotels, restaurants, bars... Well, I don't drink... But I have a Maid, car, gadgets (about to buy into some solar electricity: don't believe it will save money, just be my next new toy). So I live a life of luxury, not measured by what I have so much, as by what I do not have to do, from washing up to gardening
#28 Jan 26th, 2017, 16:01
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#28
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post Yes, Salima, would love to read more of your story. Mine is not nearly so interesting, and, being very far from a workaholic, it is much lazier.

I don't do 5* hotels, restaurants, bars... Well, I don't drink... But I have a Maid, car, gadgets (about to buy into some solar electricity: don't believe it will save money, just be my next new toy). So I live a life of luxury, not measured by what I have so much, as by what I do not have to do, from washing up to gardening
i also do not drink-my stomach wont let me, it is like an allergy.

i am living a life of luxury too compared to what i would be able to afford in usa. so i may sound like an ascetic to some people i am definitely not. i dont care for progress particularly, but civilization is a good thing. i just want to see a world without borders...yeah, i know...not in my lifetime...not all my dreams come true
#29 Jan 26th, 2017, 19:44
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#29
Nice to hear your story Salima. Enjoy it as long as you can, glad you didn't wait for retirement age to do all this. My wife has another year for retirement here in Canada and got hit with illness. Drugs are covered by insurance , $13,000.00 Cad. per month . There is no mistake in that cost. I hope no one has to live this way. Enjoy.
#30 Jan 26th, 2017, 20:47
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#30
I'm not about to recommend anything illegal but what I did do while living in India when I heard about the illness of a friend of mine who lived in the US and was faced with extortionate bills for prescription drugs (the prefectly legal equivalent of 'sell your house or die like a dog') was pick up the phone, call a doctor at Max Medical and learn that the very same product was available in India at 1/50 th of the US price (US price which was, BTW, 7 times what it cost in the EU). They came over for a visit and I don't think it was only for the pleasure of my company and to see the Taj in Agra. Regrettably, no happy ending, he died. But his widow still has a roof over her head.
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