How do people with normal salaries survive in Mumbai/Delhi?

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#16 Mar 18th, 2008, 22:37
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#16
maybe you go the really expensive ones... from what i know a beer in a pub in London is about 3 GBP , and as once memeber quoted , he paid 8 GBP for a pint...now thats about 240 INR and 480 INR.... if you are going to places costing you more than that then its the really upscale ones....

To cite an example close to home...Def col market which could be considered a close cousion of Khan market , would on an average have beer (a full bottle) falling between 100-150...and some of the places have a 50% off all the time... Swagath, Moets, RPM are some places (just to let you know im not comparing it to a dhaba )

Yes if you go to the machan or the taj then booze is expensive there...but then the majority of the Indians do not go there... which i am sure is the case back in England as well.....you have the local pubs and hangouts and then the expensive one's..?
#17 Mar 18th, 2008, 22:41
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#17
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post Those silly rents are Govt (and, I guess, some trusts) properties. Our Ironing people at the old house were paying something like Rs50 a month. Then they had to move out while the govt repaired their building; no alternative that was anywhere near their work place was offered to this elderly couple, and they had to pay Rs1000 to stay nearby. And that would have been for a tiny place.

To them that meant, ok... no food for the next three months.
Not really Nick, I know few of my relatives that still pay the same rent they have been paying for ages. Just recently the gov have new laws for renters/tenant etc etc. But that only applies to new renters etc etc.
#18 Mar 18th, 2008, 22:49
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#18
rent control still exists in India to some degree....in CP for example there are a couple of buildings where the tenants are paying negligible..... and on a personal note i feel for the landlords...

...the situations in some places are so bad that landlords actually pray that the building will be condemned sometime along the line and the government would declare it unsafe for accomodation...they would then have to move out and the landlord can go on to sell the plot.

There are also cases where old tenants are paid to leave by a new one, or a buyer....
#19 Mar 18th, 2008, 22:54
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#19
pan_nv, correction accepted.
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#20 Mar 18th, 2008, 22:55
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#20
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Originally Posted by the opoponax View Post This is why I wonder how younger people are dealing with it. The folks in Kolkata I spoke to are older, in their 50's (a friend's parents). They've lived in the same flat for 30 years. With that and smart saving, they're going to be fine.

It's someone my age I'd worry about -- what happens to the bright young things who don't luck into an IT or call center job? How do they pay the rent? This is a big deal where I live; unless you're an investment banker, people under 30 are gradually being pushed out to neighborhoods further and further from the center. As transit costs go through the roof. Granted the American economy is going to collapse before it gets to be too much of a problem (sometime this week, if the bloggers know what they're talking about). But it still sucks.
well it not uncommon to have relative's live with you if he/she has moved to city for a job. Growing up we always had relatives living with us since they were new to the city and had just started a job. Most are living with there parents so there is no rent to pay, and the salaries just out of college are through the roof, like US India's economy now depends on how much younger generation(gen X/Y/Z)spend.

US economy is collasping and no signs of getting any better anytime soon, watch for few more financial institution to go belly up,and those $600 checks will go to fill up gas and not to jump start the economy as President Bush is expecting.
#21 Mar 18th, 2008, 23:30
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#21
I can't speak for Delhi and Mumbai, but I went out in Pune and paid about Rs 100 per beer. Which is about half what I would pay in New York for the same thing, and about on par with what it would be in a smaller American town.

I think it's not so much that "going out" costs more in India, but that it has a different relationship to the price of other things. I paid about 100 for a meal in a typical 'multicuisine family restaurant' in most Indian cities, for instance. Whereas even in New York where partying/drinking is expensive, one drink won't cost the equivalent of a whole meal in a nice restaurant.

As far as remarks on this -- a lot of things add up differently. I was shocked to see that a paperback book costs about as much as a night in a decent hotel, in India. That would be like paying $50-100 for a paperback here in America.
#22 Mar 19th, 2008, 03:01
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#22
OK, I might be exaggerating a little about it being twice as expensive as England for a drink. Still, when you pay 2/3 for a beer back home you get 568ml of lovely lager , whereas here (usually for Rs200, on fri/sat evening) you'll get a pretty nasty, small bottle of kingfisher. That said, I'm sure a lot of it is about knowing where to go, which I probably don't yet.

I have been dragged along to quite a lot of nightclubs by friends in Delhi (often at posh hotels), which regularly charge Rs2000 or so on the door on a friday or saturday night, and then Rs300-500 for a drink. That seems pretty darn expensive to me - I've heard that other cities are a bit different. Other than the expat night at Urban Pind in GK1, I'm yet to find a cheap nightclub.

As you said tho, I reckon a lot of it is because one compares going out to prices of other stuff, which is obviously a lot cheaper. I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has felt a bit guilty paying the same for one bottle of beer as a nice meal for two would cost at a decent, cheap restaurant!
#23 Mar 19th, 2008, 11:10
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#23
@ED - you need to hook up with us !!

If you are still paying 2000 for an entry ticket then you are going to the wrong clubs or not learnt the Delhi way yet!!

Urban Pind is a place i frequent often and its towards the higher side...its a question of being able to locate those couple of places which you can call home for a while! Seriously check out def col market, Saket and Vasant Vihar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrEd View Post OK,you get 568ml of lovely lager , whereas here (usually for Rs200, on fri/sat evening) you'll get a pretty nasty, small bottle of kingfisher. !
.......Now hang on here a minute...!! It aint nasty...its just 'Indian'
#24 Mar 19th, 2008, 11:31
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#24
Wrt the first post:

You can still rent a two/three bedroom DDA flat in Delhi in an excellent location for less than 20k a month.

Add another 20k for living a middle class life with a child or two. BUT, no savings, no emergency money here.

-government servants and public sector folk often have free/cheap accomodation, pensions, healthcare benefits, phone and travel/holdiday expenses partly/wholly paid. Middle/senior level guys here may often even get a car and driver, or some subsidy on transport.

-Corporate employees have higher salaries but not much else. Middle/senior level guys here are getting paid more than enough to cover anything and everything, including old age.

-It's the junior corporate guys, semi skilled labour, teachers, etc and the like who are gradually being pushed down from a lower middle class existence to borderline poverty.

-Many more youngsters are living with parents in Mumbai and Delhi. Even in the upper middle class.

As many have said, if one is lucky to have accomodation (parents, or even one bought a few years ago), one has some kind of solid base. Else, the future is uncertain and cheap beer (not at the 2000 rupee clubs) may be the only way out.
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#25 Mar 19th, 2008, 11:42
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#25
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Originally Posted by capt_mahajan View Post uncertain and cheap beer (not at the 2000 rupee clubs) may be the only way out.
................
#26 Mar 21st, 2008, 18:35
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#26
Answer is simple. What Mercer is calculating is relevant only for expat lifestyle.Mercer ranking is originally meant for companies to decide on cost of posting executives around different parts of the world.
#27 Mar 21st, 2008, 20:44
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#27
According to the Dosa Index, the cost of living in Chennai is 10% of what it is in London.

But man cannot live by dosa alone
#28 Mar 22nd, 2008, 16:50
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#28
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Answer is simple. What Mercer is calculating is relevant only for expat lifestyle.Mercer ranking is originally meant for companies to decide on cost of posting executives around different parts of the world.
Doesn't that mean that Mercer is comparing like with like (ie identical lifestyles) and is therefore a very accurate comparison?

That suggests that actually the Mercer ranking is more relevant to interpreting cost of living than the way I framed the question in my last post, and the answers I received, since the definition of middle class varies between nations.
#29 Mar 22nd, 2008, 19:54
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#29
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Originally Posted by BritAsian View Post Doesn't that mean that Mercer is comparing like with like (ie identical lifestyles) and is therefore a very accurate comparison?

That suggests that actually the Mercer ranking is more relevant to interpreting cost of living than the way I framed the question in my last post, and the answers I received, since the definition of middle class varies between nations.
Mercer is comparing identical lifestyles, true, but at 'super rich ' expat level. You can't extrapolate the same into 'normal' middle class lifestyles i.e., though expat cost of living in India is comparable to that of the West, when it come to a typical middle class family (100 m2 flat, family car, kids at good English medium schools etc.) it takes way less to live in Mumbai in comparison to Washington for example.

Have a look at the cost of living comparison by UBS.

http://www.ubs.com/1/e/ubs_ch/wealth.../research.html
#30 Mar 22nd, 2008, 22:29
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#30
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post But man cannot live by dosa alone
I beg to disagree.
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