Foreigner marrying a Nepali

#1 Mar 6th, 2018, 00:57
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  • Chivalrous is offline
#1
I Am a foreigner woman living in india.
I want to marry a Nepali in Nepal.
Can someone pl guide me on following aspects:

1. Can Nepali citizenship be applied immediately after marriage?
2. Is it okay if my maiden name and surname is not changed on the Nepali passport?
3. God forbid, if after divorce, does Nepali citizenship continue?
4. Can I take my previous citizenship and passport again in future?
5. If I want to visit other countries, will i be allowed to exit from india on visit visa of other country? I have heard of Nepali girls getting offloaded at airport.
6. My future kid will have Nepali passport. In future can the kid get passport of my original country?
#2 Mar 6th, 2018, 03:36
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#2
You need some Nepali lawyer to answer these questions... On the surface, it seems that -
  • You can apply for Nepali citizenship with proof of marriage to a Nepali man and evidence that you have initiated the process of relinquishing your prior citizenship.
  • It does not seem like Nepal allows dual citizenship, so you must relinquish your current citizenship.
  • Once you relinquish your current citizenship and become a citizen of Nepal - that's what you are, with rights and responsibilities that come with that.
  • What rights your current country of citizenship/passport offers to you (in the event of divorce) or children is unclear. The answer will always be country dependent. However, the children born after relinquishing the original citizenship will be those of two Nepali citizens and it is unlikely they or you will have much rights in your country of original citizenship.
#3 Mar 6th, 2018, 04:00
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Before jumping with both feet into Nepali citizenship - I'd suggest you consider taking a Marriage visa to begin with. You can remain in Nepal as long as you wish on such a visa and keep your original citizenship. If you have children - the will likely retain the right to choose the Nepali or your current citizenship (assuming your country of current citizenship makes its citizenship available to the children of its citizens - this is the list of country that don't http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank...ild-or-spouse/) until they are of age when an election must be made, usually 18 years...
#4 Mar 8th, 2018, 09:50
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#4
Thanx for the replies.
I am still awaiting a reply to following questions:

1. Can Nepali citizenship be applied immediately after marriage or there is a waiting time before I can apply?
2. Is it okay if my maiden name and surname is not changed on the Nepali passport?
3. God forbid, if after divorce, does Nepali citizenship continue?
4. Can I take my previous citizenship and passport again in future?
5. If I want to visit other countries, will i be allowed to exit from india on visit visa of other country? I have heard of Nepali girls getting offloaded at airport.
#5 Mar 8th, 2018, 09:51
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#5
Can you suggest a good lawyer in Nepal?
#6 Mar 8th, 2018, 15:04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chivalrous View Post Thanx for the replies.
I am still awaiting a reply to following questions:

1. Can Nepali citizenship be applied immediately after marriage or there is a waiting time before I can apply?
2. Is it okay if my maiden name and surname is not changed on the Nepali passport?
3. God forbid, if after divorce, does Nepali citizenship continue?
4. Can I take my previous citizenship and passport again in future?
5. If I want to visit other countries, will i be allowed to exit from india on visit visa of other country? I have heard of Nepali girls getting offloaded at airport.
1. Nepali citizenship can be had by a foreign woman immediately on getting married to a nepali citizen; however you have to submit proof of having relinquished and establishing bonafides that are determined by relevant rules (not laws) at the time of application.

2. Unclear whether it is mandatory.

3&4: That is a question you have to find from your spouse-to-be's immigration ministry and for regaining old citizenship, your current nationality's relevant ministry, and also the nearest Embassy/Mission.

5: Nepali issue pertains to human-trafficking of nepali women to countries which import unskilled labors.
#7 Mar 8th, 2018, 15:44
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#7
Is your partner in India or Nepal?

Hmmm... I seem to remember that we have had threads about Nepalese residents in India, but I don't think that will help much. And I guess you need a site that is Nepal-centric.

Maybe you need a Nepali lawyer --- but, first and foremost, you need your Nepali spouse to be to be doing the research and the legwork for Nepal, and you need to check out the official information re potential citizenship of your offspring-to-be with the official sites of your current country-of-citizenship.
Quote:
Before jumping with both feet into Nepali citizenship - I'd suggest you consider taking a Marriage visa to begin with. You can remain in Nepal as long as you wish on such a visa and keep your original citizenship.
We don't know your nationality, but assuming that you are are American or European, it is quite possible that you currently hold a passport which allows you to visit much of the world (including America and Europe) with minimum difficulty and little or no visa expense.

I have married to an Indian, and living here, for over ten years. Whether it would actually happen or not is a different question, but I am certainly entitled to (apply for) Indian citizenship. In some ways, I should be very glad to "be" officially Indian. In other ways.... well, here's the first thing that would happen: the expense and hassle of applying for a visa to visit my mother country!

So, consider citizenship and its long-term ramifications, conveniences and nuisances, very carefully for rushing for any change.
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#8 Mar 8th, 2018, 22:21
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#8
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post .... well, here's the first thing that would happen: the expense and hassle of applying for a visa to visit my mother country!
I have a European friend who took Indian citizenship, and the consulate of his birth country was very friendly and helpful about giving him a visa as soon as he got his Indian passport. I guess he had to pay the standard fee, but I think it was a 10-year visa.
Last edited by NonIndianResident; Mar 9th, 2018 at 16:41..
#9 Mar 9th, 2018, 03:21
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#9
It's all doable. It should be easier for such an ex-citizen to get such a visa as it would be for their spouse --- and Mrs N has always got visas for UK visits, even before we were married.

But it is an expense (10-yr UK visa: lotsamoney.) and has to be considered for every country to be visited. This is, perhaps, one of the reasons why I don't see my non-Indian-Indian friends rushing to give up their American/etc citizenship even though they consider themselves permanently returned-to-India.

Heck... I don't even travel much! But it is a consideration. None of these things are necessarily dealbreakers, but should be weighed very carefully.
#10 Mar 9th, 2018, 04:19
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#10
Nick - Mrs. N's case is one where her spouse is a UK citizen.

If the OP takes the Nepalese citizenship - then the OP, her spouse and children will be Nepalese citizens - and legally in the same boat as any other Nepalese citizen looking for a visa. And, a sympathetic visa officer notwithstanding - the requirements of the visa to other countries, including things like the financial resources, plans to return if a non-immigrant visa, etc. applicable to Nepali citizen would apply. And, speaking for the US, there is no special category with different visa rules for former citizens, and I seriously doubt the legal visa requirements for other countries give any extra slack to former citizens either.

The OP needs to think long and hard before taking this step.

I do find the OP's current level of thinking and application on this matter inferred from just a few posts on this thread is well short of what is normally adequate in a decision of this magnitude. For example -
  • Can she immediately apply to for the Nepalese citizenship? The answer in affirmative can be obtained in a 2-minute google search, subject to caveats (relinquishing other citizenship) mentioned by me and nycank. But, one does wonder about the seeming urgency of this rather huge step.
  • I want to visit other countries, will i be allowed to exit from india on visit visa of other country? I am flabbergasted that this is a question from someone who is a foreign visitor in a foreign country (India). There are flights to all kinds of places from Kathmandu that don't require transiting in India. And, all kinds of foreigners transit via India - including Nepalies coming from Nepal and transiting to other countries.

So, while I wish the absolute best for the OP, I hope she gets proper guidance and puts the thinking cap on to make the best decision for herself.
#11 Mar 9th, 2018, 05:02
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#11
Exactly.

As a person who married a foreigner and moved to their country, my first priority was the whole legal visa/residency issue. I determined the steps to take, leading to a situation where, subject at least to the continuance of the marriage, I could live and stay permanently and continuously in that country.

As it happens, a direct move to citizenship, in India, in those circumstances, is simply not possible (it takes years of marriage). Whilst it cropped up in my researches and learning, it was not a priority, and is still not, twelve years later. It simply is not necessary.

The information from the OP is sparse. There is, perhaps, a lot we are not being told, and that is her right (some of us splurged far too much of our personal lives in the internet!) but, in some ways, a good answer to her question would be (and it more or less has been) yes, but why do that?
#12 Mar 9th, 2018, 05:09
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To be clear, I don't need to know the OP's motivations and compulsions. However, based on what I see so far - she needs to get advice from someone competent, whom she can trust, and someone who can give her advice that is in her best interest. This thread seems inadequate for what is a substantial life decision - at least thus far.
#13 Mar 9th, 2018, 05:25
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You do not have to get Nepalese citizenship to live in Nepal after wedding.

You can enter Nepal on a 90 days tourist visa, get married and then your partner can apply for a long term resident visa for you.

a couple of my friends have done so without any issue.
#14 Mar 10th, 2018, 06:09
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#14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govindpuri View Post You do not have to get Nepalese citizenship to live in Nepal after wedding.

You can enter Nepal on a 90 days tourist visa, get married and then your partner can apply for a long term resident visa for you.

a couple of my friends have done so without any issue.
Since the OP has not come back and told us her reasoning (And she's perfectly in her rights to not discuss it publicly on a travel forum) I shall tell you about trades in Major League baseball. Very complicated - Just like a game of 3D chess.

To get a player A from Team 1, you trade B to Team 2, who then trade a bunch of farm boys to Team 1, so that we get player A.

You'll do know that Nepali citizens do not require visa or passport to live, work, or start a business in India - Right ?
#15 Mar 10th, 2018, 08:36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nycank View Post Since the OP has not come back and told us her reasoning (And she's perfectly in her rights to not discuss it publicly on a travel forum) I shall tell you about trades in Major League baseball. Very complicated - Just like a game of 3D chess.

To get a player A from Team 1, you trade B to Team 2, who then trade a bunch of farm boys to Team 1, so that we get player A.

You'll do know that Nepali citizens do not require visa or passport to live, work, or start a business in India - Right ?
What a round about way.

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