Expats moving to India to give birth and work/study

#1 Nov 13th, 2017, 20:18
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  • infinitestudent is offline
#1
Hello IndiaMike! I have just found your site while researching my situation.

I'm a US expat with a Mexican partner currently living abroad in China. We just got the news that we are pregnant. We have been saving to move to India - the plan was to move to Rishikesh next year with our savings so that I could study yoga full time. I am transitioning into a new career as a yoga teacher and was fully prepared to spend at least 4-6 years living and training in Rishikesh and broader India.

However, with a child on the way this has gotten A LOT more complicated. I have been to India once before on a research and networking trip to Rishikesh and thus discovered how foreigners are walking targets in the country, and of course witnessed the crushing poverty as well.

So a few questions:

1 - Any foreigners who have already done this? What can you share and recommend based on your experience? What visa did you do it on? Etc...

2 - Is it possible (and sane?) to give birth via midwife in a place like rishikesh? What is the likelihood that we will face serious challenges (health, money, etc...) going through the majority of the pregnancy there? Any ballpark figures

3 - I assume the only way to do it legally is to come in on either an employment or student visa, yes? I am aware that means we have to be able to show proof of a valid marriage. I have the right to a 10 year visa as an american citizen, she will likely only be able to get 6-12 months long tourist visas - haven't done my research on that detail at this moment. But I don't see the powers that be granting us the right to have a child on tourism visas. Would we be deported? I also don't see how the kid can be given access to schooling or anything like that if they're not a citizen (bummer about Jus Soli being abolished in the 1980's thanks to Bangladesh) and we don't have the right visas for that.

3 - Is it likely that if we were successful in getting a student/employment visa arrangement that the company or school would later drop us if they discovered we were going to or already had a child after our arrival?

4 - What are some things we can't even think about or comprehend in the short and long term which will have a huge influence over the child if we choose to give birth and spend the first 4-10 years of that child's life in India?

Any and all helpful advice is deeply appreciated
#2 Nov 13th, 2017, 20:20
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#2
Sorry I incorrectly numbered the points! I was adding new ones as they came to mind or got edited into more than one question!
#3 Nov 13th, 2017, 20:59
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#3
You cannot live continuously on the typical 10 year T visa that US citizens get.

Living in India, and visiting India are two different experiences.

To get a long term Student visa you have to be admitted to a valid and accredited school and show sufficient funds. The moment you stop attending, your visa lapses.

Giving birth is not related to your status, however, the status of the child (mexican/US) will be require getting a visa immediately. You are better off raising the child in your native countries (US/Mexico) in his/her formative years.


It does not answer your question directly, but then most Yoga Teacher Training courses are 3-4 week 200 hour packages. Even if you chose to take 10, it still does not add up to 4-10 years.

And finally:


Who divined that the only way to get a Yoga teacher certification is by going to India ? There are a few in Yucatan, MX and a couple in US, and other places which are more visa friendly.
#4 Nov 14th, 2017, 01:31
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  • Nick-H is offline
#4
Nobody is going to be deported for giving birth in India, it isn't against the law. But they are also not going to let you stay any longer because you have.

Indian medical tourism is a thing these days. No idea if any of the private hospitals have thought of offering maternity packages. You could ask.

One thing you will have to do is to get a passport for your child. We have a long thread on the difficulties that people have experienced doing this. I think it may have been related to UK citizenship; I don't recall if it covered any other countries. Giving birth here (from the point of view of a foreigner) has been discussed before. You can find threads about it. Begin with the one mentioned below.

nycank has covered the reality of you and your child spending four to ten years living here.
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#5 Nov 14th, 2017, 03:44
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#5
It was years ago. But I knew a mother whose daughter had been born in Mcleod Ganj. She was South African and the absentee father was French. The child was given a local birth certificate and Mom was due to go the the SA embassy for a passport.
I wasn't around for the birth but was told the Tibetan midwife had used a old nail to to cut the umbilical cord. The kid was a happy healthy enfant and I didn't even really mind getting puked on too much.

Rishikesh has pretty good health care available by local standards and not so far away in Dehradun there is even more.

If you're willing to string it all together on tourist visas you could make a fair go of it, but know that it time may be up before you want it to.
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#6 Nov 14th, 2017, 03:51
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#6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post Indian medical tourism is a thing these days. No idea if any of the private hospitals have thought of offering maternity packages. You could ask.
OP wants the birth to be via midwife (point #2). I would guess it's related to the yoga thing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by infinitestudent View Post But I don't see the powers that be granting us the right to have a child on tourism visas.
You don't have a right to work, preach, etc. But the process of having a baby is in some sense an involuntary physical function, at least after the original voluntary function has been performed. So it can't really be forbidden by the visa T&C, and there is no reason it should be. It's not as if the baby will get any special benefit from being born in India.
Quote:
Originally Posted by skids ghost View Post ...the absentee father was French...The kid was a happy healthy enfant
Apparently some French influence remained with the child.
#7 Nov 14th, 2017, 09:00
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#7
You cannot live continuously on the typical 10 year T visa that US citizens get.

Living in India, and visiting India are two different experiences.
^^^
Yes I am aware I will have to leave every 6 months on the T which adds an element of instability to family life. I would prefer an Employment visa before anything else. Student visa would at least get my foot in the door. The T was my original plan but it doesn't look viable anymore.

Giving birth is not related to your status, however, the status of the child (mexican/US) will require getting a visa immediately. You are better off raising the child in your native countries (US/Mexico) in his/her formative years.
^^^
I don't disagree with this, I would like to hear more of the reasoning behind your statement, what exactly makes us better off? And does that mean we have to have a visa for the child on the day of birth, or apply for one on the day of birth? We are not exactly nationalists, and are big fans of the global citizen mindset which is just emerging in these times. We'd also like to raise a trilingual child. However, ideals are always subject to the reality on hand, especially when logistics like these apply.


It does not answer your question directly, but then most Yoga Teacher Training courses are 3-4 week 200 hour packages. Even if you chose to take 10, it still does not add up to 4-10 years.

Who divined that the only way to get a Yoga teacher certification is by going to India ? There are a few in Yucatan, MX and a couple in US, and other places which are more visa friendly.[/QUOTE]
^^^
Yes, at the end of the day I can train in many places, however, I was intentionally saving up a large amount of funds so that I could live and train full time there in the heart of the culture where I could also explore other related crafts such as reiki, ayurveda, etc... I want to go much deeper into my practice than the typical teachers do. I am not a fan of the yoga culture I experienced in the US - it does not serve the students the full picture, and even in the asanas where most classes place all their focus, most of the teachers have not gone so deep into the craft of yoga or the craft of teaching to take the students as far as they can go and give them the most for their money. They've all taken an American approach to it - for perfectly good reasons - which I do not wish to take, as I do not wish to serve my clients in that way. Essentially, I want to be very competitive in the global market (USA/MXC are not important to us in the long run at this time, but that can change as we learn more about this process and our situation) and I do not want to be the average teacher. I am also aware that by committing to that much training I may one day lose all interest in becoming a traditional teacher and take a very different direction. It is hard to say. Of course, all of that can be accomplished outside of India as well, and I will be flexible if it comes to that, but neither myself nor the mother really love the idea of bringing up our child in the spiritual/political environment of our home countries if we can still make Rishikesh work.
#8 Nov 14th, 2017, 09:00
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#8
You cannot live continuously on the typical 10 year T visa that US citizens get.

Living in India, and visiting India are two different experiences.
^^^
Yes I am aware I will have to leave every 6 months on the T which adds an element of instability to family life. I would prefer an Employment visa before anything else. Student visa would at least get my foot in the door. The T was my original plan but it doesn't look viable anymore.

Giving birth is not related to your status, however, the status of the child (mexican/US) will require getting a visa immediately. You are better off raising the child in your native countries (US/Mexico) in his/her formative years.
^^^
I don't disagree with this, I would like to hear more of the reasoning behind your statement, what exactly makes us better off? And does that mean we have to have a visa for the child on the day of birth, or apply for one on the day of birth? We are not exactly nationalists, and are big fans of the global citizen mindset which is just emerging in these times. We'd also like to raise a trilingual child. However, ideals are always subject to the reality on hand, especially when logistics like these apply.


It does not answer your question directly, but then most Yoga Teacher Training courses are 3-4 week 200 hour packages. Even if you chose to take 10, it still does not add up to 4-10 years.

Who divined that the only way to get a Yoga teacher certification is by going to India ? There are a few in Yucatan, MX and a couple in US, and other places which are more visa friendly.[/QUOTE]
^^^
Yes, at the end of the day I can train in many places, however, I was intentionally saving up a large amount of funds so that I could live and train full time there in the heart of the culture where I could also explore other related crafts such as reiki, ayurveda, etc... I want to go much deeper into my practice than the typical teachers do. I am not a fan of the yoga culture I experienced in the US - it does not serve the students the full picture, and even in the asanas where most classes place all their focus, most of the teachers have not gone so deep into the craft of yoga or the craft of teaching to take the students as far as they can go and give them the most for their money. They've all taken an American approach to it - for perfectly good reasons - which I do not wish to take, as I do not wish to serve my clients in that way. Essentially, I want to be very competitive in the global market (USA/MXC are not important to us in the long run at this time, but that can change as we learn more about this process and our situation) and I do not want to be the average teacher. I am also aware that by committing to that much training I may one day lose all interest in becoming a traditional teacher and take a very different direction. It is hard to say. Of course, all of that can be accomplished outside of India as well, and I will be flexible if it comes to that, but neither myself nor the mother really love the idea of bringing up our child in the spiritual/political environment of our home countries if we can still make Rishikesh work.
#9 Nov 14th, 2017, 09:07
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#9
Indian medical tourism is a thing these days. No idea if any of the private hospitals have thought of offering maternity packages. You could ask.

One thing you will have to do is to get a passport for your child. We have a long thread on the difficulties that people have experienced doing this. I think it may have been related to UK citizenship; I don't recall if it covered any other countries. Giving birth here (from the point of view of a foreigner) has been discussed before. You can find threads about it. Begin with the one mentioned below.
^^^^
I found at least 3/4 relevant threads yesterday. Any advice on how to expedite the search process to find everything on indiamike that is relevant?
#10 Nov 14th, 2017, 09:15
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#10
Also, any government websites or resources I should be aware of outside of what google searches will show me quickly?
#11 Nov 14th, 2017, 12:32
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#11
Quote:
Originally Posted by infinitestudent View Post I would prefer an Employment visa before anything else.
For an employment visa you have to have a minimum salary base of approx USD25K/yr. There are exceptions I think - Chefs and translators being two that I recall on the top of my head. Doing visa-reset runs every six months is fraught with peril.


Quote:
I don't disagree with this, I would like to hear more of the reasoning behind your statement, what exactly makes us better off? And does that mean we have to have a visa for the child on the day of birth, or apply for one on the day of birth?
Not exactly day of birth, but neither years later either. Since your child will not benefit from old jus soli, his/her visa will be co-terminus on that of his/her mother. Not exactly a desirable situation.


Quote:
and I do not want to be the average teacher. I am also aware that by committing to that much training I may one day lose all interest in becoming a traditional teacher and take a very different direction. It is hard to say. Of course, all of that can be accomplished outside of India as well, and I will be flexible if it comes to that, but neither myself nor the mother really love the idea of bringing up our child in the spiritual/political environment of our home countries if we can still make Rishikesh work.
Rishikesh is not exactly a paradise that most falangs see as short time tourists. There is always a belly of the beast kind of a situation right under the covers. I would think, maybe wrongly, that in US/MX you would have a support structure greater than in India, which is, you both on your own ! Raising one's child tri/quadlingually maybe a laudable goal, but the Indian gummint might not think that way...

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