Expat in India? What is your story?

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#46 Aug 31st, 2017, 15:24
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#46
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Originally Posted by Sungazer View Post What Nick mentioned regarding loss of his job, what seems bad at the moment doesn't have to look that bad at all a month or a year down the road...
Well, it could have been a disaster. Middle-aged, middle-management, unemployed in London with mortgage: not good prospects.

But first off, no redundancy blues. Work, even though I did enjoy some of it, what always something that I would rather not have to have done. Second, the final year of my employment was bliss: I think the Americans call it gardening leave. Yes, a year of having almost nothing to do but still being paid . The hour or three a month I did have to spend on the phone every month* left me plenty of time for internet and ideas. The company was even paying for my broadband connection.

Third off: equity in the house. Question to my Indian music (mridangam) teacher: "How long could I live in India on a hundred thousand GBP?" Answer: "For ever: the interest would be more than enough." Well, that did not take account of changing economies and my financial ineptitude. I was quite rich in Indian terms when I came here. Really, I should be richer now. I'm not: I'm considerably poorer, despite other financial injections (but I'd rather still have a mother). But pensions came along too, to top things up and, having just become a UK OAP, just had, in Indian terms, a very nice pay rise. Just... I'd better not live tooo long, because there is no more to come now.

If I was still in London... Well, the job hunt went much as expected, although I admit I was half-hearted about it. I had not reached the point (see the middle- bits above) of applying for supermarket shelf-stacking jobs, because I still had cash in the bank, but that looked like the future. Keeping the house? In doubt. There would have been enough money in the bank to... ensure I didn't get any state benefits in return for 9% of my income for thirty years.

Skeletons? Well, we weren't even living together, but it had been five years, and I'm not proud of essentially just walking out of that. Otherwise, I suppose the accounts were clear. Including, two years later, my bank account: my redundancy payout became redundant the month I sold the house.




*We had set up systems that mostly just worked. That was not the policy of the new company. Yes, there were some bad feelings, but it had been a long drawn-out story that was good to get away from. Point is that my job was never at all needed for my identity.
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#47 Aug 31st, 2017, 16:30
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post I think the Americans call it gardening leave.
It's a British term*, actually. Most commonly employed for people in the Financial services industry - a forced leave with full pay - to prevent such personnel from misusing information. Stockbrokers, investment bankers, are the ones commonly on such leave.

*wiki says it became popular via the BBC sitcom 'Yes Prime Minister'.
#48 Aug 31st, 2017, 20:20
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post Second, the final year of my employment was bliss: I think the Americans call it gardening leave.
uh, no.
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"When you are truly genuine there will invariably be people who do not accept you. And in that case, you must be your own badass self, without apology." -- Katie Goodman
#49 Aug 31st, 2017, 23:20
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Originally Posted by vaibhav_arora View Post It's a British term*, actually. ... ... ... *wiki says it became popular via the BBC sitcom 'Yes Prime Minister'.
Well I never! (Obviously)

I never knew that. Must have watched every wonderful episode of Yes [Prime]Minister too.
#50 Sep 1st, 2017, 01:50
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post Just... I'd better not live tooo long, because there is no more to come now.
LOL! Worst case scenario, you can always go Indian style and take Sannyasa
Bunking in ashram,till last breath, somewhere in Himalayas doesn't sound that bad!
#51 Sep 1st, 2017, 02:46
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Originally Posted by Sungazer View Post ,till last breath, somewhere in Himalayas doesn't sound that bad!
Lemme tell ya that still takes money, sannyas or not. But sure, one needs less, but we like our shopping eh Nick. Yet, till last breath we do part it'll do fine.
#52 Sep 1st, 2017, 04:58
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Bunking in ashram,till last breath, somewhere in Himalayas doesn't sound that bad!
Sounds... awful. Absolutely horrible!
#53 Sep 1st, 2017, 11:36
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Originally Posted by Paleface View Post Lemme tell ya that still takes money, sannyas or not....
Yeah, even those hospices in Kashi charge some for the stay!
#54 Sep 1st, 2017, 18:36
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#54
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post However, to the general idea presented by your post, I would say... No! Look for someone who speaks your language, and is fairly cosmopolitan in their outlook. If what you are saying is something like aim low, I'd say no: there is no need to, and it could be very wrong to do so. How about marrying someone very poor from a very poor background? Someone who, for instance, might view 10,000 a month as positive wealth! OK. Fine. And I know some lovely ladies who would certainly qualify... Now... Paying for their cousin's educations? And their aunties' and uncles' medical bills?
Just adding to this thought because it is hanging in my head like a loose end...

I'm not disagreeing with what I said before, but when entering into this market, it can be understood that there remain certain things which, in Indian eyes, reduce value. This can be stuff like widowed, divorced, having a child etc etc. For the average eg-european guy, many of these things in-no-way detract from a person's value.

And, for anyone who thinks this stuff is wrong, then maybe it is, I'm not having that conversation. Just trying to use the little I know to throw some light on how things are here, for the benefit of anyone who might want to join in this particular game.
#55 Sep 2nd, 2017, 12:40
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All in all, after four pages and few days of this thread, i would like to thank y'all!
It helped me to refine ideas, few ways how this could pan out- like NGO volunteering, trying to get a job within my profession(thanx Nick for encouragement on that one!), studying Hindi in India for a year etc....
#56 Sep 2nd, 2017, 17:16
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I have waited with mentioning this option: Auroville
#57 Sep 2nd, 2017, 22:47
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#57
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Originally Posted by Sungazer View Post All in all, after four pages and few days of this thread, i would like to thank y'all!
It helped me to refine ideas, few ways how this could pan out- like NGO volunteering, trying to get a job within my profession(thanx Nick for encouragement on that one!), studying Hindi in India for a year etc....
Thank you for starting the tread. I often think about things like this.

I took a year of Hindi at my local state university as a non-matriculated student, in stead of going back one year. It was pretty cool. Half the class was Indian female students, for us westerners more than half were female. Very nice learning environment I must say. One of the guys in the class had been part of the same Asian program as me in high school a couple of years before me. He recognized me from photos. I was at least familiar with him by name.

I'm still nowhere near proficient but can manage some of the basics that it takes to get through the day. I joke to myself that I can get into trouble a lot easier than I can get out. It's really great with Indians who have as good a grasp of English or less than i do. It often makes for a quite positive encounter. But then sometimes I over hear things and know I won't be making friends with those guys.

My plan is to continue to get back for a month or so per year for a few more years and them take an other go at longer term stays. If nothing else I'd like to spend a couple more years in India as a transitory period into the next phase of my life, whatever that may be.
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#58 Sep 3rd, 2017, 00:00
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Originally Posted by atala View Post I have waited with mentioning this option: Auroville
Nah, not my cup of tea. I don't get that concept, from what i know it is like sticking one's head into the sand. Thing is,one's butt gets exposed then.
Like, we're gonna go there and pretend that we can escape the monetary system and system in general!?From what i've red they are partially succeeding.
And living without making and having any money whatsoever is not sane thing in this society of ours. It is better not to depend on others for one's basic needs.

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Originally Posted by skids ghost View Post Thank you for starting the tread. I often think about things like this.
You're welcome!
I hoped it might help others too, maybe even become a place on this forum where expats,as thread title suggests, would share their story which would inspire us wanna be "Indians".

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Originally Posted by skids ghost View Post I took a year of Hindi at my local state university as a non-matriculated student, in stead of going back one year. It was pretty cool.
Cool!
I wanna learn at least basics for a starter. I was often in situations where some of the people i met couldn't speak a word of English. In Kashi for example, or at those old, narrow streets of Jodhpur and in many other occasions. At such times i felt i'm actually missing a lot because some of those people seemed to be some of the most genuine Indians i've met but due to language barrier we couldn't get to know more about each other.

On Banares Hindu University site i've read they have a diploma one year course in Hindi for foreigners. Dropped them an email but never heard back from them. Will go there in person next time i end up in Kashi.
And as im very fond of Kashi, wouldn't mind at all spending a year there!

Quote:
Originally Posted by skids ghost View Post My plan is to continue to get back for a month or so per year for a few more years and them take an other go at longer term stays. If nothing else I'd like to spend a couple more years in India as a transitory period into the next phase of my life, whatever that may be.
You never know where that can get you, be warned!
Once upon a time i went to Malaysia,thinking that i'll stay there for 6 months. Those six months turned into 4 years, failed relationship and BA degree
Shit happens...
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