Do Indian culture and personal values still exist in India?

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#76 Apr 3rd, 2014, 08:59
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#76
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Originally Posted by surya2014 View Post and decongest the subcontinent.

sounds like a colonic would help, too.
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#77 Apr 3rd, 2014, 15:05
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#77
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Originally Posted by expatv View Post My parents took me to Balavihar(Hindu Sunday school) ever week and I really feel like I understand the essence and philosophy of Hinduism and apply it to the way I live, where as my Indian relatives place more emphasis on ritual and dont dig deeper.
Is this Balvihar thingee a Vishwa Hindu Parishad operation ??
And if it is - have you, expatv - dug deep enough into it ??



:brishti
Last edited by brishti; Apr 3rd, 2014 at 17:04..
#78 Apr 5th, 2014, 01:52
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#78
Guys guys guys and girls girls girls,

India has 18 official language and 118 in all + dialects. The dialect and food changes average every 30 kilometeres.
We are non aligned - derive respect and are open to cultures.

while indian culture is one of the oldest in the world, it has evolved so much over time with consumerist ideology and free market.
India is self reliant and I guess its undervalued only due to the huge population.

> Adds 6 million mobiles a month
> largest youth population
> IT hub
> max automobiles growth
> highest per sq feet comm. utilization comparable to the best in the world

And a huge well respected knowledge base. the second largest muslim populationin the world but we have equal respect for all.

what haooened in the west in decades is happeneing here in two years. rapid infrastructure increase, golden quadilateral highways and booming growth. rupee is devalued but we are self reliant and i guess we are keen to learn and passionalte to grow.

our strength is our youth who is toiling 16-18 hrs to make a mark for the country in international scene.
so lets be prepared to accept the new age countries - BRIC - Brazil russia India china - Vrrrrroooooommmmiiinnnggg ahead.

Thanks,
Anil bhan
Last edited by anil_b; Apr 5th, 2014 at 02:39.. Reason: This is the new age India post presented with a perspective
#79 Apr 5th, 2014, 02:09
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#79
Hi,

Watch the new India -

India has road network of 4,245,429 km, third largest in world, and would add about 600kilometers of modern highway per month, on average, through 2014.

the new age markets

Biggest Bus depot in the world at Delhi


Ok i am not sure if we are allowed to post some videos -
see the videos on the new India -

thanks,
Anil bhan
Last edited by anil_b; Apr 5th, 2014 at 02:39.. Reason: This is the new age India post presented with a current perspective
#80 Apr 5th, 2014, 02:13
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#80
hi,
We will just catch up in 20 years with the largest democracy in the world(India) shaping the decisions of the world.
Culturally we are open and learning fm all. so you all are welcome - Athithi Devo Bhava...meaning 'The guest is God'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atithi_Devo_Bhav


God bless humanity

Anil bhan
#81 Apr 5th, 2014, 02:41
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#81
Hi all,

I was born in high rugged himlayas in -11C to -16C without any aircons and and staying in the plains now 44-46 degrees C.
there are extreme as well as moderate climates and poeple are quite adaptable.

while coastal south is humid, north is dry.
i quote a line that I studied in my 10th class on Indian geo - (took me 15-20m to cram) and I still remember -

"The Himalayas - Within and Broad oreographic barrier is a mosiac of climatic phenomena, at the base of which lies the Himalayan unity, characterized by the alteranation of seasons and the seasonal rythms of life - It is to this, that the life adapts and to this climate - that people await to bring in rain, crops and changes in happiness"

this is true Indian-ness and we are proud of it.

good night,
Anil bhan
Last edited by anil_b; Apr 5th, 2014 at 02:45.. Reason: Complete sentence
#82 Apr 5th, 2014, 02:47
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#82
Baba - Read my posts and se some videos...
baba ji ki Jai ho ....

Anil bhan
#83 Apr 5th, 2014, 04:54
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#83
anil, try clicking on Quote, rather than Reply.

Otherwise, we have no clue who, or what post, you are addressing.
#84 Apr 5th, 2014, 09:42
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#84
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Originally Posted by anil_b View Post I was born in high rugged himlayas in -11C to -16C without any aircons
You did mean - without heat.
#85 Apr 28th, 2014, 14:56
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I know this is a really old thread and the OP has certainly disappeared long ago. But I feel like writing anyway. I've only been in India for two years, and ONLY in the north. So take my opinion for what it's worth. But if I had a daughter, and had a choice between raising her in northern India (my husband's original home) or in the US (my original home country), I would absolutely prefer to raise her in the US.

I've gotten through the culture shock, and there are plenty of things I like about India, but I would prefer to have a daughter in a place where women are treated more equally and can live independently.

One poster said she feels safer at night in India than in Italy. That is definitely not my experience. I don't go out on my own after about 6pm. I regularly was out on my own in Chicago as late as midnight or 2am sometimes without a problem. (In my younger, more energetic days)

Obviously, the US has plenty of problems, which I will not go on to list, but I would still prefer it. My husband says the same thing.

Another thought I've had about India is that it is a lot more Darwinian than other places I've been to (17 countries not including Europe). I lived in East Africa as a volunteer for two years, too. I'm not just saying that to be negative; I think it teaches reality about what happens with human nature when people are forced to survive. Life is softer in the US, and we don't see a lot of desperation. Plus, there are the safety nets of welfare.

My inlaws behave very generously toward me, and that has always impressed me, but the rose tinting has started to peel off my glasses a bit in regard to that. I think a lot of it is due to shoring up a relationship because you might need something from the person later as much as it is about affection.

This is clear to me when I see people (like my MIL or other in-laws) mistreat people beneath them. The people beneath them won't be able to do them any favors, so why build a relationship? Important people get the royal treatment.

On a trip to the US last summer, my husband was joking that my family didnt love us as much because there was no one in the kitchen making a big meal for us, and we had to fend for ourselves with our food. (My parents are divorced and we were at my dad's house where we are storing all of our things.) His mom will get up at five a.m. and make parathas and hari mirch achar for us to take on a three hour train ride.

I said it's because we are all equals and no one has to grease the wheels of the relationship. His mom wants us to take care of her when she's older. She needs us; my family doesn't need us. She'll be able to call in favors later, as she already does when she tells him about how when he was a baby, she would move him off the wet spot at night where he urinated and sleep in it herself.

I do really like my MIL, just pointing out that in a culture where women are less valuable than men, what may be mistaken for loving attention may mostly be a little rear end kissing by people who don't have a whole lot of power and need to preserve relationships.

This whole idea of who has power here is something I've been wondering about a lot lately.
#86 Apr 30th, 2014, 09:27
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#86
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Originally Posted by monks View Post I know this is a really old thread and the OP has certainly disappeared long ago. But I feel like writing anyway. I've only been in India for two years, and ONLY in the north. So take my opinion for what it's worth. But if I had a daughter, and had a choice between raising her in northern India (my husband's original home) or in the US (my original home country), I would absolutely prefer to raise her in the US.

I've gotten through the culture shock, and there are plenty of things I like about India, but I would prefer to have a daughter in a place where women are treated more equally and can live independently.

One poster said she feels safer at night in India than in Italy. That is definitely not my experience. I don't go out on my own after about 6pm. I regularly was out on my own in Chicago as late as midnight or 2am sometimes without a problem. (In my younger, more energetic days)

Obviously, the US has plenty of problems, which I will not go on to list, but I would still prefer it. My husband says the same thing.

Another thought I've had about India is that it is a lot more Darwinian than other places I've been to (17 countries not including Europe). I lived in East Africa as a volunteer for two years, too. I'm not just saying that to be negative; I think it teaches reality about what happens with human nature when people are forced to survive. Life is softer in the US, and we don't see a lot of desperation. Plus, there are the safety nets of welfare.

My inlaws behave very generously toward me, and that has always impressed me, but the rose tinting has started to peel off my glasses a bit in regard to that. I think a lot of it is due to shoring up a relationship because you might need something from the person later as much as it is about affection.

This is clear to me when I see people (like my MIL or other in-laws) mistreat people beneath them. The people beneath them won't be able to do them any favors, so why build a relationship? Important people get the royal treatment.

On a trip to the US last summer, my husband was joking that my family didnt love us as much because there was no one in the kitchen making a big meal for us, and we had to fend for ourselves with our food. (My parents are divorced and we were at my dad's house where we are storing all of our things.) His mom will get up at five a.m. and make parathas and hari mirch achar for us to take on a three hour train ride.

I said it's because we are all equals and no one has to grease the wheels of the relationship. His mom wants us to take care of her when she's older. She needs us; my family doesn't need us. She'll be able to call in favors later, as she already does when she tells him about how when he was a baby, she would move him off the wet spot at night where he urinated and sleep in it herself.

I do really like my MIL, just pointing out that in a culture where women are less valuable than men, what may be mistaken for loving attention may mostly be a little rear end kissing by people who don't have a whole lot of power and need to preserve relationships.

This whole idea of who has power here is something I've been wondering about a lot lately.
I am not sure I entirely agree, but you are right it is far easier to be sick and/or elderly in the West than in India.

But making breakfast for you is becauuse she cares. The baby comment you made is unfair as thats just good natured ribbing. I often remind my wifes nephews and nieces how often they have puked/pooped/pissed on me and now not even a hug.

About your 2am comment, I remember the Capt saying "Just because you feel safe does not mean you are"

I was once in Birmingham (UK) City cente in the early hours of the morning I felt perfectly safe, the same year I was in Utoxeter town centre, midday, on election day, and I felt uneasy.
Lord, Grant me the Serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to hide the bodies of those people I had to kill because they pissed me off.
#87 Apr 30th, 2014, 12:47
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#87
Great vids in 79.

I can see the case for pride in modern developments as well as the concommitant chauvinism. In some areas on a Sunday roads were outstanding. However in more normal circumstances congestion was equally extraordinary. I still have kiddish joy in an auto man driving on to a sidewalk to get around vehicles. I missed the charming bungalows and didn't see value in high rise cubby holes. The malls were an experience especially the food courts (Karim's)? What troubled me was the lack of concern for the lower classes and for the rural population. I was too diligent in following my directive for the trip and should have got out of the mahanagar more. It would have been great to look at real wages of the urban working class and agrarian population. Anyone have a research interest down that line? Or something far more subtle the standard of living. I was impressed. But, with equity and concerns over slowing growth I think the edge is not as sharp as it seemed a year ago..
#88 May 5th, 2014, 21:29
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#88
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Originally Posted by JOHNLORD View Post About your 2am comment, I remember the Capt saying "Just because you feel safe does not mean you are".
I lived on the north side of Chicago for 7 years, and never had a single incident where I felt threatened as a woman. Only two things happened out of the ordinary: I had a bicycle stolen (from a garage my husband forgot to close when he left for work) and I had someone steal quarters out of my car when I forgot to lock the door overnight. Surely, in seven years, something would've happened to me if it was so unsafe?

I regularly have men leering at me in Delhi NCR, even if I'm wearing a very loose-fitting salwar khameez with a dupatta. Doesn't matter what time of day.

South India may be different. I wouldn't know, since I haven't made my way down there yet.
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