Memory makes me laughing
Joph
India > Entertainment and Food in India > Community Forums > Humour - It Only Happens in India
#1
| Senior Member

Memory makes me laughing

Just this week a memory came back to me.

One time a student from the filmacademi in Calcuta asked me, if it was true that in my country you can walk up to any woman in the street, and ask her if she wants to have sex with you.

At that time I tried to explain the nuances, but this week while remembering it I thought: "I wished that I lived in that country", :)


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some video's of mine:
https://www.youtube.com/user/IndiaJoph/videos
:)

17 Replies

#2
| Maha Guru Member
Denmark? Nah actually an old rude joke played on an Indian student in New York that worked out rather well for him..
#3
| Loud Noisy Bird
you can walk up to any woman in the street, and ask her if she wants to have sex with you.
I suppose that anyone, with about a hundred times my self-confidence and courage, anywhere can... ask!
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
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#4
| Maha Guru Member
Well, I know a country where that works Nick. But, its a secret for us geezers, not for these Lotharios. Now dates are easy. Get a copy of the student directory at a college and call. Odds are in the favor of the persistant. Don't take an easy rejection, I'm a married woman merits a response of "Better!". This also gets you ready for a career in telemarketing:)..
#5
| Loud Noisy Bird
Just the kind of advice people have always given me. What's more, many of those advisers were women! Unfortunately I remained shy and insecure.
Well, I know a country where that works Nick.

Long time ago, a friend told me about a South-American country where the women ask the men on the street (and no, not just the ones that come with price tags attached). On his second visit to that country he returned home with a wife.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#6
| Maha Guru Member
Nick

Did your friend also have the in-laws & their brood tug along with his new bride?

Cheers

Nattusbs
#7
| Loud Noisy Bird
Nope! Just the two of them returned to UK.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#8
| Senior Member

Originally posted by: Joph View Post

Just this week a memory came back to me.

One time a student from the filmacademi in Calcuta asked me, if it was true that in my country you can walk up to any woman in the street, and ask her if she wants to have sex with you.


Few years back people in calcutta were wondering why the dutch films are so popular at The Calcutta Film Festival?
Well well now I have the answer.
#9
| Senior Member
A friend told me that in old India it is the girl who proposes to the man, selecting her man.
In Mahabharata princess Rukmini was supposed to be married away to someone she did not like, so she wrote a proposal to Krishna to save her, and he did and they got married.

There is also some circumstance, which I can't remember, when if a woman askes a man for a child he could not deny.

Old India, from some thousands of years away, had many funnt things going on.
There were 3 kinds of marriages. 1. by arrangement 2. by the man abducting the girl, and 3. by mutual agreement. The 3:rd is considered the least honorable. But there is no such things as honor killing the girl. That is insanity, not culture.

Another story, if I get this right, princess Kunti as a young girl had a mantra with which she could call any demigod to her room.
She wanted to try it, so she called upon the Sun god, Surya. He magically appeared in her room, and when she wanted him to disappear, she was just testing, he informed her that if a women calls a god he is obliged to give her a child. She got shocked, had not expected that. But Surya answered that she would appear chaste and untouched even after that. An immaculate conception. So she got pregnant with her first son Karna, which she put out in a basket down the river, so that her parents would figure it out, and although he was a prince he was brought up by a worker class charioteer. [those stories]
After that Kunti repeated it with other gods 3 times and got a total of 4 sons that way.
#10
| Wanderlust - but bills bug!
Read this as a story - only the relevant section where Mahabharata context is narrated. You should have decent materials to relate the events. But do not form a judgement based out of this.
Did you wear the other person's shoe today? :goodluck:
#11
| Maha Guru Member
Bihar has had a strange custom, where sometimes the groom is abducted and forcibly married of to a girl. The abduction is arranged by the girl's family. The apparent reason behind this is that poor families are not able to marry off their girls to good boys because of the high demand of dowry by the boy's family, though asking for a dowry is illegal. This it seems solves the problems of the girl's family, it works out cheaper for the girl's family than the dowry, and the boy's family does not dare complain, because it gets some kind of social acceptance.
#12
| Senior Member
That definitively sounds like an only in india: 'groom is abducted and forcibly married of to a girl' and "boy's family does not dare complain", wow.
#13
| Account Closed
which is why some of my bihari friends moved out when they were little :)
#14
| Maha Guru Member

Originally posted by: Prisni View Post

A friend told me that in old India it is the girl who proposes to the man, selecting her man.
In Mahabharata princess Rukmini was supposed to be married away to someone she did not like, so she wrote a proposal to Krishna to save her, and he did and they got married.

There is also some circumstance, which I can't remember, when if a woman askes a man for a child he could not deny.

Old India, from some thousands of years away, had many funnt things going on.
There were 3 kinds of marriages. 1. by arrangement 2. by the man abducting the girl, and 3. by mutual agreement. The 3:rd is considered the least honorable. But there is no such things as honor killing the girl. That is insanity, not culture.

Another story, if I get this right, princess Kunti as a young girl had a mantra with which she could call any demigod to her room.
She wanted to try it, so she called upon the Sun god, Surya. He magically appeared in her room, and when she wanted him to disappear, she was just testing, he informed her that if a women calls a god he is obliged to give her a child. She got shocked, had not expected that. But Surya answered that she would appear chaste and untouched even after that. An immaculate conception. So she got pregnant with her first son Karna, which she put out in a basket down the river, so that her parents would figure it out, and although he was a prince he was brought up by a worker class charioteer. [those stories]
After that Kunti repeated it with other gods 3 times and got a total of 4 sons that way.


A woman choosing her husband is a thing of legends thousands of years old. In the recent past, the last thousand years or so, it hasn't been so. Women became a a possession and a liability at the same time, to be guarded until married off. One of the reasons might have something to do with the fact that Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (Benazir's Bhutto's father) was born to a Hindu girl who had been abducted and forcibly converted to Islam. The same thing, I think, is true of M.A. Jinnah also. Hindu elite were probably no kinder to women. Since a majority of the population was Hindu, victims were Hindus more often than not.

Hindu scriptures recognose eight forms of marriages. You will find that many Indians know little about their scriptures other than what they have learnt from hearsay or, more recently from Wikipedia. I can confirm that the story does exist. It comes from Mahabharata. Mahabharata is full of such stories. Kunti's husband Pandu, and his half brothers Dhritarashtra and Vidur, who brought up Karna were also not sired by their father. When a couple could not conceive children alternate means were provided for. Their father, who had three wives, was cursed (may be he was impotent) that he could not mate with his wife. A half brother was asked to do the job, who declined because he had taken a vow of celibacy. Another distant relative was called upon to produce an heir. The man was so ugly that the first queen shut her eyes and bore a blind son (Dhritarashtra), the second wife was told not to shut her eyes, but she turned pale from fear and bore a pale (sickly) son Pandu (pale). The third wife sent her maid instead, who bore Vidur, who was not a prince since his mother was not a princess.

Early Indian society is supposed to have been matriarchal. You see that immaculate conception might not be so immaculate after all, and so called "immaculate conception" does not imply divinity, except to believers in India too.

To go back to the OP. Unfortunately Indians do think western women are promiscuous/loose. They, many men men, think that the freedom that a woman has to choose whom she sleeps with, means that she would sleep with them too. Some people learn quickly how wrong they were once they arrive in the west, many don't. Those who have never left India also don't learn the difference between freedom and promiscuity. That is a constant source of harassment of foreign women travellers.
My bad grammar does not make bad your grammar OK.
:D
#15
| Loud Noisy Bird
Their father, who had three wives, was cursed (may be he was impotent) that he could not mate with his wife.


If I remember right, it was must not, or he would die. I think that, in the end, he did ...and died.

Trying to judge India by Mahabharata and Ramayana is like trying to judge other countries by the bible. How wonderful it must be to live in a country where people don't steal, don't kill, don't covet their neighbours' hifi (or should that be wife-fi?), etc, etc :renske:

Of course, stuff fro those epics must have sunk into the national semii-concious, just as the holy texts of other countries have affected those of us who grew up with them, even if we never subscribed to the religion. To understand how deeply the church (perhaps more than the bible!) has affected attitudes to women, read The Church and the Second Sex.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.