Taking a 1 year old to India (any precautions to think about)?

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#1 Oct 2nd, 2015, 16:02
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  • tgteam is offline
#1
Hi,

Would like to get some advise on taking a 1 year old to North India (Delhi-Jaipur-Agra) in beginning of December for 2 weeks.

We are Latvians living in London and will be going to check out the "Golden Triangle" in India + attending a friends wedding in Delhi.

I have read about all of the precautions that an adult should partake (i.e. drink bottled water, don't have ice in drinks, make sure food is hot, wash you hands regularly, avoid street food from random stalls or all together, use some mosquito repellent, avoid dairy products unless they are opened in front of you)

But for a 1 year old there is not that much information that I could find.
Just to confirm our daughter is not breastfeeding, but instead using formula milk which we will carry with us.

Also reading about it seems that Malaria pills are bit unnecessary in North of India at this time of the year + our daughter will most likely be under 11kg which means she is unable to take such drugs.

We have hired a private driver for the trip to Jaipur and will do the same for our trip to Agra. In Delhi we are planning to use metro and taxis.

Any advise would be much appreciated.

Many thanks,
Janis
#2 Oct 2nd, 2015, 16:18
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  • Nick-H is offline
#2
Quote:
Also reading about it seems that Malaria pills are bit unnecessary
Internet research might be good enough for the safety of an adult, but strongly recommend that you consult a doctor about health matters for a baby.

Also, if you haven't already seen it, please consult the NHS booklet on malaria, which you can download from this url. It is both comprehensive and readable. I see it has now been updated to 2015, but also check the NHS Fit for travel India Malaria map.

I don't know where to start with general hygiene and disease risks. It is really not a good idea to crawl on the ground and then put hands in mouth --- but that is what 1-yr-olds do
~
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#3 Oct 2nd, 2015, 17:02
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#3
1 year old is too young for malaria tabs. I thought dengue was a bigger problem in Delhi. Just take utmost care with hygiene and dress in protective clothing.

GoanGoan......here & there..Goa
#4 Oct 2nd, 2015, 17:23
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#4
Well they say a malaria tabs can be used if a child is over 11kg. Either way just looked up the NHS fit to travel map and North of Indian you don't need Malaria pills as the risk is very low.

The plan is to get good mosquito repellent and as it will be winter time wear long sleeved shirts and trousers. Especially once the sun goes down it can get really cold at that time of the year.
#5 Oct 2nd, 2015, 21:00
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#5
By the way, I forgot to say welcome to IndiaMike!

Yes, there is certainly dengue. We had another thread about dengue and youngsters recently. It seems to be bad year for it this year.

Would a Londoner find that part of India "really cold" in December? I don't know: the nearest I have done was Delhi in November, which, to me, was chilly overnight and early morning. I don't think anywhere in Northern India goes sub-zero, until you head up the mountains, but I stand to be corrected, as my week in Delhi was my only experience of the North
#6 Oct 2nd, 2015, 21:23
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#6
Thanks for the welcome.
Yes they just had on BBC about the Dengue out brake, but I think it is due to the Monsoons and will hopefully blow over with in a month or so.

we are still planning to visit GP and have a chat with him, but sometimes they can be bit negative about the whole travel thing and possible diseases that you can get. I know I had a colleague who was going to Africa and needed to get shots Yellow fewer shot and the doctor who was giving her the shot kept repeating the risks of having the actual shot, which can cause some health issues.

Also when I said "Cold" I meant to say that you will need a pull over or a jacket for evenings and early mornings as the temperatures drop quite a bit compared to what they are during the day.
#7 Oct 2nd, 2015, 21:52
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#7
Please read the beloved Nick posts carefully, there is always a get out clause.

I have seen many mums with kids both in the S and N enjoying the interaction by the locals, BTW Indians love kids especially small white ones with fair hair.

You rightly have seen the mozzie map and it does not include your travel plans.

As a Mum my now retired doc said "Mums Know best' and will take care of their kids.

Pharmacists in India are very well informed and speak excellent English, now you have the blessing of the internet.

Trust your instincts, and enjoy your trip
#8 Oct 3rd, 2015, 00:29
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post I don't think anywhere in Northern India goes sub-zero, until you head up the mountains, but I stand to be corrected, as my week in Delhi was my only experience of the North
It happens once in a while. http://nidm.gov.in/PDF/DU/2006/January/09-01-06.pdf
#9 Oct 3rd, 2015, 00:52
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#9
I have been to india with a 2,5 year old and will be back with him 5 years and his sister 20months.
We dont woory to much about the health issue, but we have been to a travel doc.
What i am really glad about is that the children were able to/are able to WALK and not crawl around on the ground....
also, we got them rabi shots, because children run up to animals all the time (and our doc just told us that they are now basicly for life)(exept of course the shots you get after an actual bite)
That said, we didnt have any trouble with the food last time, all packaged drinks were fine, and for food everybody was really helpfull (rice was always okay, and we got restaurants to cook us pasta occassionaly, and idlys were a favourite (with ketchup or jam....)).
But also, we have been to india before, and i wouldnt really recomend to go to india with a small child if you havent been before, or if you are really experienced travellers, because it is a lot to cope with and having a samll child can also be a lot to cope with....
#10 Oct 3rd, 2015, 00:55
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#10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgteam View Post Hi,

Would like to get some advise on taking a 1 year old to North India (Delhi-Jaipur-Agra) in beginning of December for 2 weeks.

We are Latvians living in London and will be going to check out the "Golden Triangle" in India + attending a friends wedding in Delhi.

I have read about all of the precautions that an adult should partake (i.e. drink bottled water, don't have ice in drinks, make sure food is hot, wash you hands regularly, avoid street food from random stalls or all together, use some mosquito repellent, avoid dairy products unless they are opened in front of you)

But for a 1 year old there is not that much information that I could find.
Just to confirm our daughter is not breastfeeding, but instead using formula milk which we will carry with us.

Also reading about it seems that Malaria pills are bit unnecessary in North of India at this time of the year + our daughter will most likely be under 11kg which means she is unable to take such drugs.

We have hired a private driver for the trip to Jaipur and will do the same for our trip to Agra. In Delhi we are planning to use metro and taxis.

Any advise would be much appreciated.

Many thanks,
Janis
I am not a parent but I do have friends and family, (residents as well as visitors) who are.

Forget the anti malaria pills. Honestly, I don't know why anybody takes those. The potential side effects are awful, and it makes little sense in terms of cost/hassle vs utility, but let's not get into that debate.. During December mosquitoes are usually not be a problem in the Golden Triangle area. Use mosquito nets, anti mosquito creams, sprays and electric repellents like "Goodnight" and "All Out"- both easily available in India.
#11 Oct 3rd, 2015, 01:48
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#11
Quote:
Originally Posted by malewitsch View Post and idlys were a favourite (with ketchup or jam....).
Fusion rules!
#12 Oct 3rd, 2015, 03:33
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#12
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Originally Posted by BholeBaba View Post I am not a parent..............
Looking at your picture it is no wonder!
#13 Oct 3rd, 2015, 04:50
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BB, its because the alternative is much worse. However, you are right on about repellents, etc. The only "safe" malaria regime for Malaria at such a young age is Malarone (child dosage) and it costs a fortune. Of course, given what happened to a friend who had his toddler die...

Perhaps a more common hazard is dehydration from a host of intestinal ails. You can take medications with you for sudden developments and also remedies such as Pedialyte in tasty liquid and freezable form (popsicle style)..
#14 Oct 3rd, 2015, 10:14
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#14
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Originally Posted by Lalu Prasad View Post Looking at your picture it is no wonder!
Right. Lalu Prasad is an apt name for such idiotic utterances.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardseco View Post BB, its because the alternative is much worse. However, you are right on about repellents, etc. The only "safe" malaria regime for Malaria at such a young age is Malarone (child dosage) and it costs a fortune. Of course, given what happened to a friend who had his toddler die...

Perhaps a more common hazard is dehydration from a host of intestinal ails. You can take medications with you for sudden developments and also remedies such as Pedialyte in tasty liquid and freezable form (popsicle style)..
Ed, I'll briefly explain my position on this. IMHO Malaria is not so common or widespread a disease in places like the Golden Triangle (not to mention many other areas within India and elsewhere) as to warrant the daily intake of preventative tablets carrying a range of potential side effects.

Yes, shit can happen. But as you said, it can happen in any number of ways. One can die from food poisoning or an errant viral fever- I know somebody who died due to the latter, contracted on a trek in the Himalayas. In so far as mosquitoes are concerned, I'd be more worried about dengue (for which there is no prophylactic and no proper treatment, unlike Malaria), and which, from what I have seen happen to many people, is way more deadly. Same goes for Chikungunya.

(I had malaria as a kid. I got it on a trip to Ahmadabad. I suffered through high fevers and chills for a few days..)

Malaria isn't something any resident of the area is immune to, and so I would think that, living in the disease-ridden third world, many well-off local families would also be advised by their doctors to take these pills or give them to their infants and toddlers. But they are never told to do so. The advice is always to cover up, keep your immediate environment clean, use a spray, repellent etc. In fact, our family doctor is strongly against anti-malarials, on account of the fact that these increase the likelihood of rendering viable treatments resistant.

I can understand that for an American or European person planning a trip to India or Africa for the first time, vaccinations against horrible diseases springs first and foremost to mind, but I do think that in some cases the decisions taken are an overkill, on a balance of probabilities.
#15 Oct 3rd, 2015, 10:54
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#15
Hi,

I would suggest not to use metro in Delhi as metro's in Delhi are very crowded and its not suitable for a child. Using taxi is better option as that will help you to protect baby from dust and all.

Also, for a young one what I suggest is that there is not much thinking to do there are just basic things as you mentioned earlier that you have to keep in mind.
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