large quantities of drugs (prescription!)
wanderbug
India > India Travel Basics > India Travel > Health and Well Being in India
#1
| Looking is for free

large quantities of drugs (prescription!)

hi all,

i am unfortunately epileptic, though thankfully it is totally controlled. i need to take 2 tablets every morning and evening and wonder whether taking a 6 month supply of these into india would be much of a problem as long as they are packaged and with a prescription. think it would be a good idea to translate a letter from my doc?

any help appreciated :D

andy

13 Replies

#2
| Maha Guru Member

Originally posted by: wanderbughi all,

i am unfortunately epileptic, though thankfully it is totally controlled. i need to take 2 tablets every morning and evening and wonder whether taking a 6 month supply of these into india would be much of a problem as long as they are packaged and with a prescription. think it would be a good idea to translate a letter from my doc?

any help appreciated :D

andy



You shouldn't have any problems, Just make sure that they're all in their dispensed packaging. A note from your doctor or hospital explaining what they are wouldn't go amiss as a back up. It would be ok written in english, no need to have it translated.

Make sure when travelling that your supply is split up into 2/3 seperate places, ie bag, pack, body, just in case of the worse scenario

Happy Travelling,,,,,,,
#3
| Guru
Just make sure that they're all in their dispensed packaging.
you, as long as they in the original packaging, you should be ok.
#4
| Maha Guru Member

No problem

I took several large bottles of prescription pills and customs didn't even open my bags. What they did at Chennai was x-ray everyones cabin luggage on the way into India. Guess they were worried that someone might hijack a rickshaw.
All my stuff was in original containers with the Doctors name and details so didn't expect any hassle. Check the price of your meds in India. You may be pleasantly surprised and able to save quite a bit of change buying local. Do check expiry dates though.

Wanderer22
#5
| Maha Guru Member
>> You may be pleasantly surprised and able to save quite a bit of change buying local. <<


Yup, you can save a lot buying in India. Got my Canadian prescription filled out in Goa and the price difference was huge. A capsule which costs $1.80 in Canada was available for just Rupees 7 which is about 20 cents. :cool:
#6
| Nothing is illegal until you get caught~
I had a couple bottles of medicine go with me...nobody so much as sniffed in my direction.....I had perscriptions as well in case the bottles were gone missing...no problem.
There is no defense against chaos~
#7
| Account Closed
The question is not about what happens if no one checks your medicines of course but what happens if they do. Taking a prescription in plain written English (preferably typed) as to what they are and why you're taking them should normally do the trick. If the drugs you're taking are very kinky somehow maybe enquire with your own embassy in India and the Indian one at home first.

nb Since you're talking about taking some 720 potentially hefty pills taking something at least vaguely officially-looking to explain it doesn't seem at all superfluous to me. Most officials anywhere in the world will just love such documents that will give them something to note down.
Reading tips, all picked up at IndiaMike :bunny: : INDAX's A Comprehensive Guide To India / ITHVC on Culture Shock & Travel Health / JetLag Travel Guides For the Undiscerning Traveller / India Travel Links
#8
| Gypsy at heart
We flew into Delhi in Dec 2004 and Mumbai Feb 2005 with 4 syringes, 2 packs each of antibiotics, cold & flu tabs, anti stomach bug stuff, assorted aspirins, painkillers etc. etc. AND a letter from our Doc and had no trouble. All this stuff was in our checked baggage!
#9
| Loud Noisy Bird
720! Yes, I think you should ask your doctor for a prescription/note.

the suspicion customs may have is that you are trying to import something for sale.

It might be interesting the enquire the cost at a pharmacy here, but I would doubt that it would be cheaper than UK. A one-off course of a week's antibiotics, for example, would cost much less than the UK's GBP6 (?) prescription charge (NHS? Huh :( ), but for someone on long-term medication would, I guess have season ticket or other cheaper arrangement.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#10
| Looking is for free
Thanx for your help everyone,

Half of me was thinking i would be thrown into jail for 400 years and the other that i was more likely to be asked "fancy a go flying the plane?" than get stopped!

I definetly feel more assured now though. Just need to get the doc to write a note etc. etc.
#11
| Senior Member
When you come to India, just carry the name of the drug to any good chemist/retail outlet/pharmacy and maybe you can get the same medicine at 1/5th to 1/8th the cost while you are going back home. Manufactured by reputed companies and in many cases MNCs like Pfizer, Glaxo, Novartis too.
#12
| Looking is for free
cool. i never really thought that possible. I was unaware that such companies distributed throughout asia and beyond....! Mine are all mostly Glaxco Smithy. Will definetly have a look! :)
#13
| Loud Noisy Bird
Indian customs seem to be more interested in hastling Indian people bringing camcorders, microwave ovens, televisions, etc etc etc for their relatives than with any tourist stuff. Still: best to be on the safe side.

Oh, and you might not get the GSK originals, but something identical manufactured by a local pharmaceutical company and much cheeper.

You might also get a pill the right colour with the right design stamped on it but no active ingredient! So far I've not worried about this, but if I really depended on any medicine I'd examine it very carefuly when buying.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#14
| Maha Guru Member
I took three months' worth of 6 or 7 medications and had no problems at either end of my trip. When I got to India, these were all in original packaging, but by the time I returned to the US, with less than two weeks' meds remaining, I'd combined them into two pill containers. Nobody even looked at them!
The map is not the territory. --Alfred Korzybski

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