Freaking out. Am I woefully unprepared?

#1 Oct 4th, 2016, 15:06
Join Date:
Oct 2016
Location:
Lancashire
Posts:
2
  • Mellowyellow89 is offline
#1
Hi there,

26 year old male from the UK. I fly out to India tomorrow evening and I'm starting to freak out a bit. I'm travelling by myself for the first time. I'll be in India for two months and Nepal for one.

I have a vague itinerary but I have not booked any trains or flights or anything for the trekking in Nepal. The only thing I have booked is my hostel in Delhi for when I arrive.

I wanted to go with the flow with this trip, but starting to think I've been really stupid and should have booked certain things.

I have read up about common hassles in India but I do not really feel prepared for what I am going to be faced with. I am fairly well travelled and have been to poor countries before, but it seems like India is just another level.

I do feel like I rushed in planning this trip but I really wanted to get out there as soon as possible.

Are there any general tips you can give me or anything which can allay some of my fears?! I hope once I get there things will fall into place but right now I'm freaking out a bit!

Thank you
#2 Oct 4th, 2016, 15:31
Join Date:
Nov 2003
Location:
melbourne, australia
Posts:
1,181
  • unclelach is offline
#2
The obvious preparation is to read the current Lonely Planet guide on your flight. Start with the Delhi section and also the general chapters. To save the considerable weight, buy a download ebook version - as many parts as needed for your travel.

Same advice applies for Nepal. LP NEPAL trekking guides seemed good once but not my thing.
This space intentionally left blank.
#3 Oct 4th, 2016, 15:34
Join Date:
Jan 2008
Location:
The peanut gallery
Posts:
834
  • Rasika is offline
#3
You'll be fine. My main piece of advice is to pack light - that will give you more flexibility to move around, by bus or train or whatever. You can always buy whatever you need there. I suggest taking a good money belt for passport and credit cards - that's all you really need, you don't even need a towel, whatever Douglas Adams says.

Have a look at redbus.in for when you want to get anywhere, it shows some of the possible buses you can book, even at the last minute. And trains, you can try to get in the foreign travellers quota.

If you walk down Thamel, in Kathmandu, you will find loads of agencies selling treks. Depending on how fit and flexible you are, you can do either the Annapurna region or the Khumbu region on your own or by getting a porter at the trailhead.

Do you have a draft itinerary?
#4 Oct 4th, 2016, 15:43
Join Date:
Feb 2011
Location:
London
Posts:
1,695
  • NomadicBoo is offline
#4
You will be fine, but take a few days in Delhi to acclimatise before you move on. Delhi is probably the toughest place to start and I did that in 2008 (about a week after the Mumbai terror attacks) and with zero prep and had never left Europe and I was fine. So stop worrying. Once you've gotten used to Delhi everything else should be a doddle.

Delhi is scam central, so the most important advice is to get to your room quickly and safely. Once you have the security of a base you'll feel more comfortable and nearly every scam is avoidable when you're not stressed/carrying luggage/looking for a room.

Top things to look out for:

1) Have your hotel pick you up from the airport or at the very least use the pre-paid counter in the airport. Don't just walk out amongst the taxi-wallahs/vultures
2) Pre-book a room for a couple of days (you can always move or extend if you want to stay in Delhi longer)
3) Don't let anyone convince you they're taking you to an official tourist office - just say no and keep walking
4) You're hotel hasn't burned down, I assure you, no matter how many times your taxi driver tells you it has

You're going for an adventure of a lifetime, chin up!

NB
"See the World, then see India - because the World is an anti-climax"
#5 Oct 4th, 2016, 16:22
Join Date:
Oct 2009
Location:
NOTTINGHAM
Posts:
1,621
  • OldandRambling is offline
#5
My main advice is that anyone who approaches you with "offers" of help or advice or even conversation should be viewed with total suspicion. Be rude, walk away, don't get into conversation. It is not dangerous as such, but it can lead to you losing money in one scam or another.
Be aware that a "hostel" in India is not going to be the same as a youth hostel in the west. You can find a decent air conditioned hotel in Delhi for around £10 a night, I would suggest you go for a bit of comfort for a few nights while you get your bearings.
Once you have been there a few days, you can relax your guard and decide which "offers" you may want to listen to!

Keep in touch on India Mike too!


Edwin.
#6 Oct 4th, 2016, 20:08
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
70,824
  • Nick-H is offline
#6
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldandRambling View Post Be aware that a "hostel" in India is not going to be the same as a youth hostel in the west.
there is [at least one?] Youth Hostel in Delhi. I stayed there when we had the International IndiaMike Moderators' Meet six or seven years ago. Good value, and it is in the middle of a posh area.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#7 Oct 4th, 2016, 21:49
Join Date:
Jul 2011
Location:
Canada
Posts:
573
  • sab kuch milega is offline
#7
Where are you staying in Delhi? I would try to get a fairly decent place so you can get your bearings...Connaught Place area is pretty solid. Spend the money here, you'll be glad you did. Then get down to the train station (avoid ANYBODY who wants to take you to the office) and check out Tatkal tickets. Yes, the line up will be long... Good luck!
It might be the best of times or the worst of times...but it's the only time you've got!
#8 Oct 4th, 2016, 22:32
Join Date:
Dec 2008
Location:
In the land of awesomeness
Posts:
32,551
  • aarosh is offline
#8
Check with the hostel if they could arrange a pick up for you from the airport. It may be costlier. However don't let a couple of hundreds spoil the start of your India visit. Get your body accustomed to the time zone. If need be use cab to see the sights in Delhi.

FTQ might help you. Note that it is not available for all trains and can not be booked from all stations. For more information on FTQ read http://trainstuff.in/ftq. Also scroll down to see where the tickets can be booked.

What is your vague itinerary?

If you first plan to visit Himachal, then you can travel by bus. HRTC / HPTDC are state transport Himachal Pradesh. HRTC website for time table http://www.hrtchp.com/hrtctickets/Availability.aspx (this will only show buses that can be booked online). If you want to call and ask about timings not shown in the time table call the numbers http://www.hrtchp.com/hrtctickets/. HPTDC time table http://hp.gov.in/hptdc/Availability.aspx

If you first plan to visit Rajashtan, then also you can travel by bus. RSRTC is the state transport for Rajasthan. RSRTC website for time table https://rsrtconline.rajasthan.gov.in/busenquiry/en. You can also avail buses of DTC, http://dtc.nic.in/dt4.htm
#9 Oct 4th, 2016, 23:13
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
you essay
Posts:
4,390
  • ananda2193 is offline
#9
If anyone talks to you like "What country?" "First time India?" or just say's anything ignore them. Don't even look at them and keep walking confidently. I would use an I=pod though it wasn't necessarily on and point to my ears and say can't hear you. But avoidance of eye contact and ignoring works just as well.
"Travel is fatal to prejudice,bigotry and narrow-mindedness" Mark Twain
#10 Oct 5th, 2016, 01:07
Join Date:
Sep 2001
Location:
UK
Posts:
16,662
  • steven_ber is offline
#10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mellowyellow89 View Post I am fairly well travelled and have been to poor countries before, but it seems like India is just another level.
The poverty can be shocking, but what takes it to another level (for me) is how it sits comfortable alongside great wealth, after travelling around India for many years I get the feeling India has a bigger middle class than all of Europe put together, and that surprised me more than anything, don't really know why, perhaps I had my own prejudices before I first arrived.


I fully understand why people advise against getting into conversations with Indians in Delhi, it's not prejudice, just experience, and the same advice can be valid for all major tourist destinations in India, but do try not to totally cut yourself off, talk to locals on buses, trains, cafes, anywhere where you're likely to meet normal Indians, these conversations can reassure you, and can prove to be one of the hilights of your trip, needless to say, you'll learn more about how life is in India from talking to a local rather than the nonsense sometimes printed in guidebooks.

If it's any help, most people who've travelled regularly in India would give anything to swap places with you, to have those nerves mixed with excitement, it's a great feeling that you never get back again.

http://www.indiamike.com/india/india...riences-t2037/





.
#11 Oct 5th, 2016, 02:04
Join Date:
Oct 2016
Location:
Lancashire
Posts:
2
  • Mellowyellow89 is offline
#11
Thank you very much guys for your helpful and encouraging words. I actually think I'm overthinking it all and playing out all the worst case scenarios in my head!

You've made me feel a lot calmer about it all. I really need to just relax...
#12 Oct 5th, 2016, 02:52
Join Date:
May 2016
Location:
Argyl ,Scotland
Posts:
237
  • lismoresimon23 is online now
#12
You will be fine, you have traveled before so just follow the normal drill. Do not believe anything anyone tells you if you are within viewing distance of New Delhi railway station ,no matter how official they appear. The metro is a great and cheap way to get around.As for not pre-booking transport etc it means you are far more flexible,you may find somewere amazing that you just have to stay for a few extra days/weeks or even months. My modus operandi is to book an onward train journey as soon as I arrive in a new place,you can always cancel/change, it gives you an idea of what trains are available. Being flexible on which class you travel on is handy too. Above all take a sense of humour and an appreciation of the absurbed. Happy traveling. All the best Simon.
#13 Oct 5th, 2016, 03:20
Join Date:
Jun 2007
Location:
London
Posts:
1,819
  • captain bruce is offline
#13
Chill out, most people come back alive from India......
Random thoughts:
The advice above is pertinent but you knew that anyway, you were just panicking.
By all means be careful - no-one is your friend if they declare that after 30 seconds acquaintance but dont assume that the entire population is intent on scamming you.
Remember the quote " I have often been dependent on the comfort of strangers" - or something like that, after all in your part of the world people talk to you in bus queues - India is the same, although it helps to have some knowledge of recent cricketing events.
My own preference is to pack heavy, if you go trekking you can always stash it in a safe guesthouse - when you first travel solo you may need the comfort of "stuff".
Dont be afraid of being alone - you can learn from it.
#14 Oct 5th, 2016, 05:56
Join Date:
Jun 2008
Location:
New York, New York
Posts:
758
  • NYTim is offline
#14
I came back década.
#15 Oct 5th, 2016, 06:54
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
you essay
Posts:
4,390
  • ananda2193 is offline
#15
At first I thought you said female. Now I read male. I'm speechless. Just do it as Nike says. You'll be better for it after.

Posting Rules

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Forum Rules»
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2
© IndiaMike.com 2018
Page Load Success