Rabies incidences

#1 Apr 10th, 2012, 18:10
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Let me start saying there is no need to panic or avoiding all dogs, however it is important that people who do get bitten in unprovoked incidences do get the full course of anti-rabies vaccinations, 5 in total. In the last ten days we have had three dogs in which are highly suspect of rabies.

As I said, there is no need to panic or avoid dogs, just take action if you do get bitten.

Also, if you happen to be in Goa, looking after a dog, please get it vaccinated against rabies. It is just INR 150 and can be given to all dogs of 3 months and older. Booster injections have to be given each year.

One of the above mentioned rabies cases was a dog which had been looked after for 5 months by a foreigner who neglected get it vaccinated...
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#2 Apr 13th, 2012, 12:09
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Yes, most neglectful..
#3 Apr 21st, 2012, 02:13
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Thanks for the info.

As a foreign tourist, should I get rabbies "vaccination" before coming to india?
#4 Apr 21st, 2012, 03:02
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#4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrowman View Post Thanks for the info.

As a foreign tourist, should I get rabbies "vaccination" before coming to india?
No, there is no need to be vaccinated against an awful Scottish poet........... also no need for any rabies injections, unless you are unlucky enough to get bitten.

Being hit by demented traffic is a greater risk, and vaccinations are not available
#5 Apr 21st, 2012, 03:26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrowman View Post As a foreign tourist, should I get rabbies "vaccination" before coming to india?
I was reading some stuff a few days ago about attempts to treat rabies, and the minute number of people who are known to have survived it. (surfing... no idea where, but might have been BBC). I think much of the stuff quoted was from American sources and talking about American cases. Bat bites, skunk bites, all sorts of stuff --- so perhaps you could remove the words, "before coming to India" from your question!

Major consideration: are you likely to be travelling in areas where you will be unable to reach a major hospital quickly?

If I remember correctly, you still need post-exposure vaccination after a bite, even if you have taken the pre-exposure course, but it will be a shorter course (three instead of five jabs?). I think it also renders the immunoglobin [???] unnecessary --- and it might not be available.
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#6 Apr 21st, 2012, 12:53
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post If I remember correctly, you still need post-exposure vaccination after a bite, even if you have taken the pre-exposure course, but it will be a shorter course (three instead of five jabs?). I think it also renders the immunoglobin [???] unnecessary --- and it might not be available.
You will need two more jabs if you have had the pre-exposure course of 3 jabs (so in total still 5). If you have had the pre-exposure, you indeed do not need the immunoglobin.

With the pre-exposure jabs you will have some more time to get to the hospital. How much more time is difficult to say because it depends of the severity and location of the bite but probably 24 hours (possibly longer), so enough time to get to a city where you could get the post-exposure jabs in case they are not available locally.

FIRST AID
The most important is that if you get bitten, you immediately wash the wound out with lots of water and soap for about 10 minutes. After that apply something that disinfects like betadine (a small tube of cream, cheap, easy to always carry with you).

The rabies virus is weak in skin and muscle tissue so washing tends to remove/kill it, apparently up to 95-99%. Also remember that even if a dog is rabid it is only contagious two days before it shows signs and the time after (usually no more than a few days before it dies). And even a bite from a rabid dog does not necessarily transmit rabies.

So the risk is very low for normal travelers but if you do get bitten do not take any risk and get the jabs!
Last edited by birds; Apr 23rd, 2012 at 12:40..
#7 Apr 21st, 2012, 13:07
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The most important is that if you get bitten, you immediately wash the wound out with lots of water and soap for about 10 minutes.
Must be very unpleasant and painful for something like a dog bite but it has to be done. Thanks to information posted here (probably by Birds ), when I was bitten by a cat, I washed for ten minutes with soap and Detol, but that was two clear puncture wounds from the canine (feline?) teeth with no tearing of flesh. The doctor said I'd done the right thing.

I did this, and then went immediately to the hospital for the innoculations, despite that

--- it was 1.00am.

--- I knew the stray cat well, absolutely no sign of illness.

--- the doctors recommended that I should have anti-tetanus, but said there was actually no risk of rabies.

I never saw a real need to get it done before, but now I have had the course, I'm happy that I did. Mind you, it is a lot cheaper in India than in America.

Just one more note: it is not just dogs, any mammal bite should be considered dangerous.
#8 Apr 21st, 2012, 13:32
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In Goa we get rabid cows!
They are really, really scary when they go on a rampage!
#9 Apr 21st, 2012, 13:39
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Scary to even think about. Do they bite? How do they catch rabies?
#10 Apr 21st, 2012, 13:54
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They get bitten by rabid dogs. A rabid cow can attack everything with its horns, bites and kicks. It is very dangerous to catch them! Unfortunately the guys who do it get paid a pittance of less than INR 6,000 per month!
#11 May 18th, 2012, 21:55
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Thank you everyone for the advice. I think we'll avoid the rabies pre-shots vacines and just hope random mammmels don't bite us. If they do, we'll have to get the 5 shots I supposed, but it sounds like that happens quite a bit in India anyway.

Thanks again.
#12 May 18th, 2012, 23:25
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If it did happen quite a bit (getting bitten by random animals) then it would be almost suicidal to come without the pre-exposure jabs!

The only reason it is not essential is that, mostly, if you leave the dogs and monkeys alone, they will leave you alone, and if the worst should happen, a hospital won't be far away.

If you going anywhere where that might not be true, best rethink.
#13 May 18th, 2012, 23:54
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I am going for my first jab 1.st June, And I will try to avoid cows I did not do it before. I touched them but it seems that it was silly.
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#14 May 19th, 2012, 00:48
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no need to have rabies jabs in advance. if you get bitten then do as the op says and wash wound for 10 minuites and seek a course of jabs. this applies wether you have had 1 jab in advance of your trip or not. The chance of you getting a bite is low.
#15 May 19th, 2012, 03:39
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#15
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do as the op says and wash wound for 10 minuites and seek a course of jabs.
Whilst thinking, "I might be about to die." And you might.

...is the difference.

And it is three for pre-exposure, and it means you only need three, not five, after you got bitten, and if you did get really unlucky and the hospital said, "Oh dear, you really need the immunoglobin, and we might be able to get some by the end of next week," then you'd be ok because you wouldn't need it.

But yes, the chances of getting bitten are, given reasonable precautions and common sense, low.

getting the jabs is trivial, it's just a case of paying for it, which, it seems is not so trivial in some places.

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