customs clearing
mick_so
India > Community Forums > Chai and Chat
#1
| Member

customs clearing

hi there,

i put myself in a plane and my motorcycle on a vessel a couple of weeks ago. i arrived in mumbai one month ago, the bike about two weeks later.

i want to do the customs clearing... myself. i love challenges;-). so far i was able to figure out that it is quite a hassle to do so. but hey, if you don t try, you will never find out...

so, does anyone have experience in clearing a motorcycle (or a vehicle) out of customs...? i am using a carnet de passages.

cheers

mick

7 Replies

#2
| Survivor
Don't want to put you off, but.....clearing anything is a total pain in the a.....
GoanGoan......here & there:unsure:..Goacool:
#3
| On the Move
clearing is tough job i think..
#4
| Lost in Space
Haven't don a motor bike but sent a pile of luggage by freight a while back.

So essentially it is about your attitude, stay cool, plenty of general chit chat and if they warm to you then the papers move easily.

Have plenty of cash in your pocket, not for bribes but each form when stamped requires various fees, there may be 4 or 5 to get stamped. There will be about 4 different places that you have to wander off to and hopefully they are all open at the same time. You will also probably have to go to a bank in the complex to make a payment as this one requires the banks stamp. It may take about 3 hours to go through the process so be prepared for that with water and something to nibble to keep the energy levels up. It is good to have someone with you that has a little authority and or speaks the language well, it all helps if there is a sticking point.

But with an in transit bike it should be fine. What sort of bike, love to get my hands on a Triumph Bonnie as I am thinking about importing one.
#5
| Member

what bike

Originally posted by: mira4bai4But with an in transit bike it should be fine. What sort of bike, love to get my hands on a Triumph Bonnie as I am thinking about importing one.



well, it s a suzuki dr 800 s. i am extremely happy with the decision (i have been considering all sorts of bikes). as it is a 98 model it can be fixed anywhere (at least in theory). for the (african) desert it is a bit too heavy though.
#6
| Guru
Find a customs agent in Bombay. They specialize in getting the cutoms to clear your vehicles. Just getting the customs to take a look at your consignment could be a project by itself. And for every day you bike remains in the bonded wareouse, you will have to pay demmurage charges, that may very well exceed the cost of the bike.

Originally posted by: mick_so
myself. i love challenges;-)


India is a challenge, even if you don;t go looking for one.
#7
| Naan.tering Nabob
I have had computer equipment clear immediately ..... and similar equipment declared with exactly the same description take upwards of 6 months. ..... it's a bit of a crapshot but a good well connected agent is definitely recommended.
We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time. ~
T. S. Eliot

http://www.derekgrantdigital.com
#8
| Lost in Space
Would agree that for sea freight a customs agent is essential and making sure that they have the information on hand well before the cargo arrives is also essential. They do have a good system here, but they are as 'per the norms' under staffed and lack motivation so having a skilled negotiator working with you will be advantageous. At least seek the advice of a customs agent that has dealt with bikes to see what the potential pitfalls maybe. Fore warned is fore armed.

My experience was with air freight so a slightly different and less congested process.

There are only 3 ports that the bike can come in by but can be transported by rail to other destinations before it is cleared by customs.

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