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#76 Aug 30th, 2017, 17:56
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#76
Observed the ‘All American Eclipse’ on Aug 21st, 2017, from Grand Tetons National Park, Wyoming, USA. Observing the total eclipse was even more beautiful because of the spectacular Teton mountains (~13,775 feet) in the background.


Even though the eclipse path runs for more than 2500miles from Oregon to South Carolina, the path of totality is just 70miles wide, which is the reason one needs to travel to the center line to experience totality.


There were several first time totality viewers in the crowd. We set up binoculars with solar filters and let people look at a larger image.


Total solar eclipse is a thrilling experience. We explained to the crowd what to look for at totality and how to enjoy the heavenly phenomena.


The whole eclipse lasts for ~2hrs 30mins, so there is enough time to schmooze and laughs.









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"Space isn't remote at all. It's only an hour's drive away if your car could go straight upwards." Sir Fred Hoyle (1915-2001)
#77 Aug 30th, 2017, 18:11
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#77
ABSOLUTELY superb!

I think I saw you, from the Moon:


Aug. 29, 2017
NASA’s Lunar Mission Captures Solar Eclipse as Seen From the Moon

Quote:
During the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, captured an image of the Moon’s shadow over a large region of the United States, centered just north of Nashville, Tennessee.

As LRO crossed the lunar south pole heading north at 3,579 mph (1,600 meters per second), the shadow of the Moon was racing across the United States at 1,500 mph (670 meters per second).

Source: NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter shows the shadow of the Moon cast on the United States during the Aug. 21, 2017, total solar eclipse.
Credits: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

Quote:
A few minutes later, LRO began a slow 180-degree turn to look back at Earth, capturing an image of the eclipse very near the location where totality lasted the longest. The spacecraft’s Narrow Angle Camera began scanning Earth at 2:25:30 p.m. EDT (18:25:30 UTC) and completed the image 18 seconds later.

...


Coming up:

The Grand Finale Toolkit
#78 Aug 30th, 2017, 19:12
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#78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ViShVa View Post ABSOLUTELY superb!

I think I saw you, from the Moon:
May be you meant to post the below link of shadow.

You can see the Moon shadow transit Earth in the below link. It is a gif image.

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/g...across-america

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#79 Sep 15th, 2017, 06:54
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#79
Cassini Grand Finale - Less than 12 hours to go:

"As Cassini makes its final approach to Saturn, this page will be updated with the latest mission status.
Where is Cassini now? Latest Updates"


source


source


source

"For an updated timeline of planned mission milestones, see the End of Mission Timeline"


Great animation here:

Cassini's Final Plunge

#80 Sep 15th, 2017, 08:13
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Cassini was launched in 1997. It took Cassini 7-years to get to Saturn and it arrived in 2004. It spent 13years around Saturn and its spectacular rings and 62 moons. Now, Cassini’s fuel is almost gone after spending 20yrs in space. To keep the lakes of Saturn’s moon Titan and snows of Saturn’s moon Enceladus untouched by any earthly microbes, the spacecraft must be destroyed. On Sep 15, 2017 Cassini would crash into Saturn and burn into just a meteor-flash streak of light.

Cassini Burns Into Saturn on September 15, 2017

(Dennis Overbye – NYTimes science writer – narrates it beautifully in the below video, which also has beautiful graphics)


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#81 Sep 15th, 2017, 08:34
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#81
When Cassini takes a photo of Saturn and sends, it takes 1hour and 24mins to arrive on Earth.

Cassini took many spectacular photos of Saturn.

Here is one of my favorites ..... Earth, a pale blue dot .....


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#82 Sep 15th, 2017, 09:32
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#82
This has been a good journey, and the most exciting phase will probably be provided by last moments of Cassini's life.

RW, I think this is not a single shot, but a mosaic.
If you find my posts confrontationist, please bear, I am an old frustrated guy who has nothing better to do than sit on rocking chair and curse the world whole day
#83 Sep 15th, 2017, 14:30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWeHavingFunYet View Post ... To keep the lakes of Saturn’s moon Titan and snows of Saturn’s moon Enceladus untouched by any earthly microbes, the spacecraft must be destroyed ...
Just wondering - Don't European microbes count anymore?

Was Huygens guaranteed to be disinfected before crashing into Titan?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jituyadav View Post ... I think this is not a single shot, but a mosaic.
Most shots are composites. No less marvellous for that.
#84 Sep 15th, 2017, 18:43
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#84
End of Mission



"Latest Updates - The final signal will take 83 minutes to reach Earth.


End of Mission - September 15, 2017 - COMPLETED

Sept. 15, 2017 (3:31 a.m. PDT): Cassini is scheduled to begin its entry into Saturn's atmosphere soon, with a confirming signal received on Earth at 4:55 a.m. PDT (7:55 a.m. EDT). Engineers anticipate loss of contact about one minute later.

Sept. 15, 2017 (1:55 a.m. PDT): Cassini engineers have received the signal that Cassini has started a five-minute roll to point the instrument that will sample Saturn's atmosphere (INMS) into the optimal direction, facing the direction of the oncoming gases. Along with this roll, the spacecraft is reconfiguring its systems for real-time data transmission at a rate of 27 kilobits per second (3.4 kilobytes per second). Final, real-time relay of data starts immediately after. That relay marks the beginning of Cassini's final plunge."
#85 Sep 27th, 2017, 21:34
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#85

ESA releases film of Aurora Borealis shot from ISS

#86 Nov 28th, 2017, 08:35
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#86
Our Story in One Minute (entire backstory of human existence in 1min)

Big Bang (0:10), early universe, formation of Earth and Moon (0:25)
emergence of multi-celled life and plants (0:35)
the rise of reptiles and dinosaurs (0:45), a devastating meteor strike (0:50)
the rise of mammals and humans (0:55)
and finally the rise of modern civilization (1:15)

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#87 Nov 28th, 2017, 18:57
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#87
This is a good example of why it is a very bad idea to put in one minute something as complex as creation of universe
#88 Feb 12th, 2018, 21:27
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#88
RWe, or anyone else who can help. I am planning to buy a telescope under 50K, it would be really helpful if you can name a few that you found best from your experience, thanks.
#89 Feb 13th, 2018, 06:27
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#89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jituyadav View Post RWe, or anyone else who can help. I am planning to buy a telescope under 50K, it would be really helpful if you can name a few that you found best from your experience, thanks.
Have a look at Celestron and Orion. They have a good range.
#90 Feb 13th, 2018, 09:43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Govindpuri View Post Have a look at Celestron and Orion.
Thanks GP, I will probably buy from Celestron or Orion, but these are just brands, I am looking for specific recommendation, be it of any brand. The two that I like are Orion Skyquest XT8 and Celestron Nexstar 6SE/8SE.
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