Astronomy

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#31 May 5th, 2014, 07:49
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#31
Ursa Major: The line joining Merak and Dubhe, if visually extended, points to Polaris - the North Star, and is therefore one good way of finding out where North lies. That is probably where the Brahmin marriage thingy comes from.
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#32 May 5th, 2014, 09:36
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#32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govindpuri View Post It is 10x20 not very good.
It is too small. Do you remember this clip from a down-under movie.

I know you wouldn't see anything even if you have a 10x50 or a big telescope. Stars look like stars naked eye or 10x50 binos or a big telescope. Lots of parents with questions show up with their kid and the telescope they purchased and the first question I ask them is, “Why did you buy this telescope?” They say, “We wanted out son/ daughter to become a scientist.”

Many people think buying a telescope is like buying a TV. You buy a TV and plug it in and you start laughing watching TV programs. Telescope is not like that. One needs to learn the sky first. Otherwise you are lost with a 10x20 or a big telescope.

What exactly is your interest in Astronomy?
  • You want to see objects in the sky? – No worries. Someone will show it to you.
  • You want to build a telescope? – Possible. Grind a mirror and build one from scratch.
  • Are you a armchair astronomer? – Know where you came from and where you're going?
  • Like SatNav (GoTo) astronomy? – Yes, it is available, no need to learn anything.
  • Find all the stuff yourself manually by learning the sky – Yes, it is possible.

Question: What exactly is your interest in Astronomy?

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"Space isn't remote at all. It's only an hour's drive away if your car could go straight upwards." – Sir Fred Hoyle (1915-2001)
#33 May 5th, 2014, 09:52
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#33
Quote:
Originally Posted by capt_mahajan View Post Ursa Major: The line joining Merak and Dubhe, if visually extended, points to Polaris - the North Star, and is therefore one good way of finding out where North lies.
Yes.



Quote:
That is probably where the Brahmin marriage thingy comes from.

Yes, but the Brahmin does'nt know sheet. He basically points to the direction opposite of Sun during daytime. At night he points towards the 7 stars or some random direction as Sun is not there.

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Last edited by RWeHavingFunYet; May 5th, 2014 at 17:55..
#34 May 5th, 2014, 13:47
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#34
Quote:
Originally Posted by RWeHavingFunYet View Post It is too small. Do you remember this clip from a down-under movie.

I know you wouldn't see anything even if you have a 10x50 or a big telescope. Stars look like stars naked eye or 10x50 binos or a big telescope. Lots of parents with questions show up with their kid and the telescope they purchased and the first question I ask them is, “Why did you buy this telescope?” They say, “We wanted out son/ daughter to become a scientist.”

Many people think buying a telescope is like buying a TV. You buy a TV and plug it in and you start laughing watching TV programs. Telescope is not like that. One needs to learn the sky first. Otherwise you are lost with a 10x20 or a big telescope.

What exactly is your interest in Astronomy?
  • You want to see objects in the sky? – No worries. Someone will show it to you.
  • You want to build a telescope? – Possible. Grind a mirror and build one from scratch.
  • Are you a armchair astronomer? – Know where you came from and where you're going?
  • Like SatNav (GoTo) astronomy? – Yes, it is available, no need to learn anything.
  • Find all the stuff yourself manually by learning the sky – Yes, it is possible.

Question: What exactly is your interest in Astronomy?

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I love that clip. Hoges at his best. I guess I would like to know what I am looking at and where objects can be found in the sky. Mostly I look at the sky when there is a news about some event. Which is every now and then.
#35 May 5th, 2014, 18:07
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#35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govindpuri View Post I guess I would like to know what I am looking at and where objects can be found in the sky. Mostly I look at the sky when there is a news about some event. Which is every now and then.
You need to learn to identify the constellations. Learn the 12 signs of Zodiac. All planets are found in Zodiac. Currently Jupiter is in Gemini, Mars is in Virgo and Saturn is in Libra. Find these first. Once you find them you see them always.

Look for this week at a glance: http://www.skyandtelescope.com/ There is Southern version of this magazine. Google it. Good luck.

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#36 May 15th, 2014, 01:05
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#36
Night sky is one of the most beautiful things, so overwhelming and so humbling..
Sunlight is nothing but a veil that covers this true nature of universe, one that is dark and mysterious.

Orion and Sirius, Cassiopeia and the big dipper were the easiest. Orion's belt formed the tri-murtis. His sword, hanging from the belt always faded. And so was the rest of the small dipper.

It was fun since the Indian and western constellations at times differed and many a times were similar.

Does anyone remember the meteor shower of 1999? And Hale-Bopp? that is when I got to see the craters in the moon for the first time, thanks to the physics club at a neighbouring college, which had arranged for good telescopes.

Hills are great for gazing up at the sky. There was a time I could tell time looking at the position of Cassiopeia and big dipper. But unfortunately for me the days of serious star gazing are kind of over, owing to a peculiar condition of my eyesight. Still, it is one of the activities that I enjoy the most.
#37 May 15th, 2014, 01:27
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#37
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Originally Posted by ashyashwin View Post Hills are great for gazing up at the sky. There was a time I could tell time looking at the position of Cassiopeia and big dipper.
Have you seen this photo in IM of star trails over Leh?

http://www.indiamike.com/india-image...rails-over-leh

Apparently you can make out the Big Dipper (the Plough) and Cassiopeia

The same guy, Yongyut, has an amazing one of the Milky Way too.

http://www.indiamike.com/india-image...ion-star-hotel
#38 May 15th, 2014, 02:09
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#38
Wow.
Julia, thanks for linking those awesome photographs. the time-lag snap is stunning, and so is the milky way. Wonderful snaps.

Many years ago, the Sunday supplements of newspapers used to carry pictures of sky in the next week. Donot see them anymore. There were some nice books for amateurs, the one I used to love was Joy of Nature by Alma Guinness, published by Readers Digest. Unfortunately out of print now.



One big problem for sky gazers is the light pollution.

May be, this story was posted elsewhere in IM, on efforts to switch off lights in the night, and reclaim the beauty of night that we have forgotten.
#39 May 17th, 2014, 02:14
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#39
Can anyone explain (in a simple way ) why the moon has been so amazingly orange the last couple of days? Last night it came up about 10pm and it was stunning, just above the hill across the valley from me, huge and with a beautiful orange glow. The orange only lasted 10 minutes or so. I took some photos but I haven't really looked at them yet and don't expect they'll be up to much.
#40 May 17th, 2014, 02:45
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#40
'Blood moon' will be a sight to behold, weather permitting

Talks about
Quote:
The four blood moons will occur in roughly six-month intervals on the following dates: April 15, 2014; October 8, 2014; April 4, 2015, and September 28, 2015.
Otherwise check out: Orange Moon
Quote:
Have you ever wondered why the moon is more orange or yellow in color when it first rises at night. This effect is caused by the atmosphere of the earth. The reason for the orange color is due to the scattering of light by the atmosphere. When the moon is near the horizon, the moonlight must pass through much more atmosphere than when the moon is directly overhead. By the time the moonlight reaches your eyes, the blue, green, and purple pieces of visible light have been scattered away by air molecules. That's why you only see yellow, orange, or red.

The moon can have an orange color at any time of the year. Sometimes the moon appears orange even when it's directly overhead. This occurs when there's a lot of dust, smoke, or pollution in the atmosphere. The size of those particles will determine the type of color you will see.
or

https://www.google.co.in/#q=orange+moon

http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/que...php?number=280
#41 May 17th, 2014, 02:55
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#41
Thanks! It doesn't seem like it was a 'Blood Moon' caused by an eclipse, more likely just because it was so near the horizon and so big and in a clear mostly cloudless sky. I can't quite get my head round this 'scattering of light' stuff yet though.

My photos are crap unfortunately - just a big orange blob in a a black sky!
#42 May 17th, 2014, 03:05
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#42
I saw it yesterday too, low on the horizon against the Bombay skyline, huge and deep orange.
#43 May 17th, 2014, 03:15
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#43
I am very thick. If I saw the big orange moon low on the horizon at 10pm, does that mean you saw it at the exact same time in Bombay ie 2.30am this morning? Or did it rise earlier in the evening for you?
#44 May 17th, 2014, 03:35
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#44
It would rise at different times depending on the longitude, just as the Sun does. There may be times when one could see it from both places. I saw it yesterday around 8.00pm in the Eastern sky en route to "blueFrog" for a concert.
#45 May 17th, 2014, 04:18
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#45
Yesterday in your country something special happened.

Ireland May15, 2014 Sunset at ~9:15PM Moonrose at ~9:15PM

Yesterday your Moon rose in the orange glow of Sun.

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Last edited by RWeHavingFunYet; May 18th, 2014 at 08:45..
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