Wild, Wild Country

#1 Apr 26th, 2018, 02:46
Join Date:
Jun 2007
Location:
Dallas, Texas USA
Posts:
651
  • Gardener972 is offline
#1
What a fascinating documentary! Having just finished "Wild, Wild Country" on Netflix, I'm wondering how many people are in India now who lived in Oregon in the '80's?

I did some research on people from the film and where they are today. I wonder about the people who were not part of the "inner circle"... what has become of them? Are those who came back to Pune with the Bhagwan still in Pune?

Also, what did they do for money? Did they charge a fee to join their commune or did people give all their money to the commune? Where did he get the money to purchase 93 Rolls Royces?
#2 Apr 26th, 2018, 03:44
Join Date:
May 2005
Location:
u.k.
Posts:
4,997
  • kullukid is offline
#2
I watched the first episode, haven't got around to watching the rest yet. I have a friend who lived in Pune for many years.
SOS: Missing Person...

Please look at this thread: http://www.indiamike.com/india/uttar...012-a-t159252/

He could be anywhere now: You might have met him, be able to help, or give information.
#3 Apr 26th, 2018, 06:10
Join Date:
May 2015
Location:
USA
Posts:
355
  • surya2015 is offline
#3
I presume the Rolls Royces were all donations. Sheila, could have answered that question. I suspect there was an element of underlying conspiracy that remained the main reason to shut down the Rajneeshpuram without any question, American style though. A hindu man running his own town, though didn’t preach Hinduism, was not acceptable to the Oregon natives. Since there was no serious case to begin with, he was expelled on the charges of immigration violations.
#4 Apr 26th, 2018, 11:08
Join Date:
Feb 2014
Location:
Delhi
Posts:
5,646
  • BholeBaba is offline
#4
I'm still in awe of Sheela.
#5 Apr 26th, 2018, 19:34
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
70,425
  • Nick-H is offline
#5
Quote:
Originally Posted by surya2015 View Post ... ... ... he was expelled on the charges of immigration violations.
I thought it was tax evasion, but I must have confused him with Al Capone.

.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#6 Apr 27th, 2018, 00:15
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
Illinois-New Mexico-India
Posts:
12,098
  • Sama is offline
#6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gardener972 View Post What a fascinating documentary!

Many articles have come out since that doc dropped on Netflix, you can google for them. This is the latest one I've read.

It certainly wasn't all peace love dove in the ashram. I read that Osho really didn't want kids there and ones that were there were completely separated from their parents and left to survive on their own. Feral children.

Back in the day I remember reading about what happened in Oregon but I had no idea they tried to poison the town of The Dalles and bused in homeless people to influence voting and then tried to keep them docile by feeding them Haldol in their beer. Sickening.

I knew a few who went to Pune back in the day, mostly for the sex. You had to show your AIDS test results. No one who was HIV+ would be allowed to enter the ashram.

Frankly, any place where everyone has to dress the same isn't for me. How boring.
My India Photos, 2005-2017
"When you are truly genuine there will invariably be people who do not accept you. And in that case, you must be your own badass self, without apology." -- Katie Goodman
#7 Apr 27th, 2018, 20:04
Join Date:
Jan 2004
Location:
Ladakh
Posts:
3,395
  • NonIndianResident is offline
#7
I lived in the US at the time and I clearly remember all the scandals about the voting fraud, the bussing in of homeless people from far away cities to vote in local elections. A few years ago I got interested again and googled it up. They had gone around the town and poisoned the salad bars so that legitimate local residents would (hopefully) get sick and stay home on voting day, and their bussed in homeless voters could dominate the election. There were other more violent things that they did.

Later I became friends with a woman who had joined it back then, and she said it had been good for her at that time in her life, but she could now, later, see that it had had some very very bad stuff happening.

There was violence, there was coercion, there were families destroyed. Lives were destroyed. It was not a conspiracy by the government to eject a spiritual group that they didn't like just for their hippy-dippiness.
#8 Apr 28th, 2018, 06:06
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
you essay
Posts:
4,390
  • ananda2193 is offline
#8
High Sama!

Here's the whole Doc!

http://hdflix.net/series/wild-wild-c...n-1/?e=1363423

Indian Gurus?:rol leyes::rol leyes:
"Travel is fatal to prejudice,bigotry and narrow-mindedness" Mark Twain
#9 Apr 28th, 2018, 06:56
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
you essay
Posts:
4,390
  • ananda2193 is offline
#9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sama View Post Frankly, any place where everyone has to dress the same isn't for me. How boring.
Boring! No! Cult, mind controllers! India is King of scam artists and Gurus!!!

I will NEVER believe any Indian spiritualist!

Well that want's my money at least!
#10 Apr 29th, 2018, 05:57
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
Illinois-New Mexico-India
Posts:
12,098
  • Sama is offline
#10

Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by ananda2193 View Post High...
"high" -- you're funny. you back here, boo?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ananda2193 View Post Cult, mind controllers!
I'm with ya. I'm not the ashram type. There's a reason The Ex called me La Loba. I'm a lone wolf, always was and will be 'til the day I die. And why I travel solo.
#11 Apr 30th, 2018, 01:53
Join Date:
May 2015
Location:
USA
Posts:
355
  • surya2015 is offline
#11
He wasnt preaching hinduism...
#12 May 3rd, 2018, 06:24
Join Date:
May 2015
Location:
USA
Posts:
355
  • surya2015 is offline
#12
There were some followers of Rajneesh who have made it look as if he has something quite significant to teach to seekers. Get rid of all the material distractions first so that the path of enlightenment becomes less difficult. By overindulging in them, no less!

A Princeton university Professor abandons his family and gives up New Jersey life only to live in the Ashram for decades until his death. I would not have done that myself, but then what would I have done if I were single?

“……Just before my reporting trip, Dara’s mother, Sandra, sat with me in her historic home outside Princeton. Her story was devastating. First, her husband, David Burrows, left her. He had been a tenured literature professor at Rutgers University, and the couple had four children together. David met Rajneesh on a trip to India in 1978, and the experience was profound. Back on the Rutgers campus, David began dressing in orange, wearing a beaded necklace with Bhagwan’s photo on it and insisting that he be called Swami Das Anudas. University life soon lost its hold, and Davis moved to India to be with Bhagwan full-time.
Just as Sandra was recovering from that shock, David gave his daughter, Dara, a collection of Bhagwan’s speeches. Dara was hooked immediately by his promise of “a new way of being,” his rejection of the “institutional, rigid ways of society,” and she booked a trip to India to meet the guru.

“Her father gave her the money. It just kind of happened, kind of quietly, without me being privy to the decision,” Sandra told me, as I recounted in a New Jersey Monthly Magazine feature story in 1986.
Mere weeks later, the terse postcard arrived back home. Dara, the Princeton Day School graduate, had become Ma Prem Dara and joined her father in the cult. “All through my childhood I thought I was the odd one,” Dara told me back then. “When I met Bhagwan he was just saying everything I was feeling all my life. It was like I could breathe ... ”

“….For five years, the Burrows children resigned themselves to the loss of their father and oldest sister. Then, in the summer of 1984, 22-year-old Jamie accepted an invitation to visit Rancho Rajneesh, where Dara and David had moved. Improbably, the Burrows’ youngest son also fell under the spell. When I interviewed Jamie, Dara and David together at the commune in 1984, Jamie was wearing the traditional Bhagwan “mala” necklace and introduced himself to me as Swami Anand Brahma. “The all-American family,” one sannyasin quipped, as she passed by our table. ….”

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry...b054d118df49c1
Apparently he had combined eastern mysticism with western philosophy. Is that the reason westerners are attracted to his philosophy more than Asians. His books and CDs are selling very well even now.

http://www.religioustolerance.org/rajneesh.htm
#13 May 3rd, 2018, 16:24
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
70,425
  • Nick-H is offline
#13
It's part of what cults, including the more "traditional" religions do: they inspire strong beliefs, polarise people, and existing relationships suffer as a result. Some are more anti-"outsiders" than others.

To me, there was always something repellent about the guy. Would not have gone near him. I remember a bookshop in London that was (mostly-eastern) spiritual/esoteric. Very far from exclusively his stuff, but the people were into him, and recordings of his voice were usually being played. I would take a quick look around, find what I wanted and get out quick!

Not interested in reading any of his books... but, if you tell me something he said, chances are that I would say, "that makes sense."
#14 May 16th, 2018, 03:20
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
Illinois-New Mexico-India
Posts:
12,098
  • Sama is offline
#14
In case the OP still cares, this is interesting article I read the other day that speaks to how Osho became Osho and a little history of Sheela:

Othering the Godman

"When unpacked, transnational spiritual histories like those of Osho can explain how pseudo-spirituality has been kept alive and well by gullible white Americans who liberally borrow from Eastern mystical traditions and rebrand them as human-centred psychologies: just think of Goop’s yoni chakras, or Joshua Tree meditation retreats, or the Hindu/Buddhist cosplay you find at Coachella and Burning Man. But in Wild Wild Country blinkered vision, the concern is reversed; scared Christians are set against cunning Indians—and in this case especially, a wily Indian woman in the figure of Sheela. American audiences, for whom free market nostalgia myths are typically populated by white Americans, characteristically refuse to acknowledge a profitable spiritual enterprise spearheaded largely by an Indian woman."
#15 May 16th, 2018, 04:02
Join Date:
Aug 2004
Location:
Vermont
Posts:
14,340
  • hfot2 is offline
#15
Quote:
Originally Posted by surya2015 View Post ...A Princeton university Professor abandons his family and gives up New Jersey life...Sandra...sat with me in her historic home outside Princeton...her husband, David Burrows...had been a tenured literature professor at Rutgers University...
If I understand this story aright, then there's a small Ivy League quibble to be quibbed here. The father was not a Princeton University professor, but a Rutgers professor who happened to live outside Princeton. Sometimes it seems like anyone in New Jersey who lives within an hour's drive of Princeton claims to live in Princeton.
Walt Whitman - Song of Myself

Do I contradict myself?
Very well then I contradict myself,
(I am large, I contain multitudes.)

Similar Threads

Title, Username, & Date Last Post Replies Views Forum
Wild Wild Dooars... Nov 23rd, 2016 11:26 2 1307 Indian Wildlife and National Parks
Wild peacocks? Apr 11th, 2006 09:14 8 2873 Indian Wildlife and National Parks
Sleeping in the Wild Oct 28th, 2005 19:34 1 1640 Packing Tips for India travel


Posting Rules

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Forum Rules»
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2
© IndiaMike.com 2018
Page Load Success