Who's reading what, when & the experience

#3931 Aug 23rd, 2017, 11:02
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#3931
I've just finished India: a portrait by Michael French. An excellent read particularly if you have interest in politics.

I've now moved on to The Silk Roads by Peter Frankopan. Only a couple of chapters in but a very promising start.

NB
"See the World, then see India - because the World is an anti-climax"
#3932 Jan 7th, 2018, 00:13
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#3932
The Delhi World Book Fair opened today. Publishers from about forty countries are participating. If there's one thing I like about book fairs, it's a chance to leisurely browse through titles of your choice - and get acquainted with ones you'd likely not see when shopping online - though prices online can't be beat....

The fair is massive - well all Delhi affairs are at a certain scale - I covered three halls - I think there are eight.

This is a music stage - some poets were about to start reading ghazals

Vernacular literature from across India - Marathi, Gujarati, Tamil, Hindi was present in a big way.

Great experience - go there if youre in the area. I picked up five titles in no time
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#3933 Jan 7th, 2018, 00:25
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#3933
The Book Fair used to be in Feb. Two years ago they moved it to early January
#3934 Jan 7th, 2018, 00:40
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#3934
Arey they've kept Surajkund for you !
#3935 Jan 7th, 2018, 01:02
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#3935

Amitav Ghosh

Half way through an excellent series of books written by Amiav Ghosh . It starts with "the glass Palace " (fiction ) The history of Burma during the Raj and proceeds through Opium production in Bengal and the subsequent problems with china " River of smoke " " Flood of fire " and " sea of poppies " Excellent reads .
eyes ,eyes that have seen all , come back to the white chrysanthemum (Basho)
#3936 Jun 13th, 2018, 18:04
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#3936
Taking Jack London's Call of the Wild and Jon Krakauer's Into Thin Air for my trek. Will let you all know how they both are.
#3937 Jun 13th, 2018, 18:22
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#3937
Quote:
Originally Posted by freenote View Post Half way through an excellent series of books written by Amiav Ghosh . It starts with "the glass Palace " (fiction ) The history of Burma during the Raj and proceeds through Opium production in Bengal and the subsequent problems with china " River of smoke " " Flood of fire " and " sea of poppies " Excellent reads .
A very good read indeed, I have read them more than once.
Just finished:
My name is red
The main characters in the novel are miniaturists in the Ottoman Empire, one of whom is murdered in the first chapter. now read on
Downloaded it for free to Apps - Aldiko
#3938 Jun 13th, 2018, 20:41
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#3938
I've nearly finished Travels in a Dervish Cloak by Isambard Wilkinson. There exist better examples of travel writing but I can still recommend it.
#3939 Jun 14th, 2018, 10:09
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#3939
I recently wrote a post compiling some of the books that have inspired me or have been fantastic companions on my trips. I alphabetical order, these would be: Cat's Cradle, (The) Hobbit, Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises, (The) Motorcycle Diaries, On The Road, (The) Snow Leopard.

Link to the post for those interested: https://www.kponthego.com/2018/05/a-...avel-with.html
#3940 Jun 22nd, 2018, 01:02
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#3940
Just read Fatal Misconception by Matthew Connelly. it's a highly critical appraisal of 20th century attempts at population control. There's a chapter each on the sterilization policy of the Indira Gandhi government and China's one-child policy.

I must have missed it when it was published. I suppose the pun in the title misled me into overlooking it in a list of newly published books.
#3941 Jun 29th, 2018, 11:50
It's all Greek to me, but Benglish will do
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#3941
Currently reading two books.

One is called "At the Existentialist Cafe", by Sarah Bakewell.

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Very interesting study of philosophers such as Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Martin Heidegger, and many more.

The other is a novel called "Call Me Zebra" by the (improbably named) Iranian author Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi. No wonder she prefers to be known as "zebra" !

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This is a story of a wandering exile who is mourning her lost country and dead family who winds up in Catalonia paying homage (through walking and reading and writing) to her favourite authors ... a very weird book, but interesting nevertheless.
#3942 Jun 29th, 2018, 12:10
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#3942
Quote:
Originally Posted by NomadicBoo View Post I've just finished India: a portrait by Michael French. An excellent read particularly if you have interest in politics.

Seconded.
#3943 Jul 1st, 2018, 01:22
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#3943
Happily I found a second hand book shop nearby and catching up on all books I've missed out on. Just read the book "One Indian Girl" by Chetan Bagat. For me it's chick lit. Easy to read and enjoyable. The type of things you'd read on the beach where you don't have to concentrate.

I liked the strong femal character that doesn't allow herself to get pushed around or do something she doesn't want to, but it also has deeper issues with the subject around arranged marriage and I'm sure there's many Indian women, and other women can empathise with the characters situation.
#3944 Jul 4th, 2018, 08:25
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#3944
Majumdar, et al An Advanced History of India. Good to see my old comments in the margin. Malik Ambar rocks. There's nothing new in Indian politics that didn't go on for at least two millenia. That's a nuanced take of a discussion I had at the home of a JNU historian couple eons ago. Now I would take a friend's suggestion at that time to be more tactful and less ideological..
#3945 Jul 11th, 2018, 11:31
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#3945
Calcutta: Two years in the city by Amit Chaudhuri. I picked it up thinking that given the author's credentials (lots of critical acclaim, some prizes here and there), it would be a great read. It started OK, the author described his childhood and growing up in Mumbai, then living in London, etc. However, that was the good part. He moves from interlude to side story , often they are not connected to the narrative and by the end of the story, you're wondering why was it needed here. It is a confusing and confused book, and i cannot finish it.

I've moved to reading Eduardo Galleano's Open Veins of Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent. It was not a book recommended to me, but rather something i chanced upon on Amazon. What's striking about the book, more than the content, is the almost lyrical quality that springs forth from the prose. If you read history, the quality of writing determines whether you'd actually be able to read a book and enjoy it. My impression of British authors in history is many just use a narrative style - you're pretty much told what happened. American narrative, apart from linguistic differences, is also quite full of juxtaposition of events. [Some indian authors who wrote history when i was a student, were so dull so as to be unreadable - no wonder history was not a popular subject].

This book, perhaps because it was written in Spanish and then translated (it turns out by Cedric Belfrage) 'feels' like you're reading a prose poem - except that what you're reading about is murder, loot, arson, genocide, rape, pillage and worse, page after sordid page. Galeano certainly didnt hold himself back describing the turn of events. No gloss here, not at all. A bit like watching a Guillermo Del Toro or Luc Besson flick after overdosing on hollywood.

It is an incredible book.
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