Who's reading what, when & the experience

#2416 Jul 26th, 2010, 22:19
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#2416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aishah View Post Is Sam Miller, the fellow who walked Delhi in every decreasing circles?
Yes, he drew a spiral on a map of Delhi and then used his Eicher atlas to follow this spiral inward as closely as possible.

He just loves Delhi. I love Delhi too, but Delhi doesn't seem to love me
#2417 Jul 26th, 2010, 22:25
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#2417
I must get his book sometime as it sounds fascinating to me. I also love Delhi, Golghar, pockets of history there all over the place.
Every cloud has a silver lining!
#2418 Jul 27th, 2010, 00:25
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#2418
Currently reading 26/11: Mumbai Attacked.
Excellent minute by minute account of the attacks through the eyes of the journalists, survivors and the security forces.
Good read.
#2419 Jul 27th, 2010, 00:59
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#2419
I couldn't.

It was enough of a nightmare sitting through the TV coverage, which was amplified by IndiaMike coverage, including posts from one on-the-spot member. You might well remember the thread?

It's one of those dates in history, about which so many of us will always remember where we were. I was on holiday in London; the corner-shop man's wife was in Mumbai, buying wedding clothes.
#2420 Jul 27th, 2010, 02:14
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#2420
Quote:
Originally Posted by sam371 View Post Currently reading 26/11: Mumbai Attacked.
Excellent minute by minute account of the attacks through the eyes of the journalists, survivors and the security forces.
Good read.
I'll second that. Bought it last year in India. Excellent, if naturally often chilling, reading.

I don't think I readily agree with all of its inferences or propositions (I'm notably, but not just, thinking now of the one cop, or military man?, suggesting less democracy and more autonomy to the police and security forces is what's needed, if I recall. And then the clear Pakistan vs. us angle I just always have trouble going for, I never believe the world is quite as black-and-white, whether I'm right in that or otherwise), but with its many contributions and angles (to others: It's a collection of different essays, or journalistic writings and interviews, and by a number of authors), certainly overall a very good read, and contributing to an understanding of what may have happened there, and what all lay behind it.
#2421 Jul 27th, 2010, 03:20
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#2421
Interesting thoughts indeed.
There's also a documentary that came out earlier this year. It was a co-production of BBC and HBO, I believe. Has actual footage and recorded conversations between the terrorists and the handlers as things were going down. Positively chilling!
#2422 Jul 27th, 2010, 03:42
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#2422
Yes, I've seen it, and a few like it, I think; I guess many here have, it's been discussed several times.

I'm likewise cynical of it all having been conveniently recorded as it's claimed to be; same as my misgivings at the interviews with that one surviving perpetrator not long after his capture, where he (seemingly quite freely and relaxedly even) owns up to it all, getting into quite some details of the operation and its organization, too. That just doesn't add up to me.

Some scenes in those documentaries just drove me to tears though, there's no question about it. It's that stupid thing where it just comes too close to home; I mean why should we not cry about any such victims anywhere, right.

And seeing them I'd just been there; and had visited CST station not long after the event; and such. Very close, yes. I could swear I could almost understand some of those people speaking in their despair; when of course I can't, I speak none of the languages there. All just very familiar.
#2423 Aug 2nd, 2010, 19:59
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#2423
Robert Fisk, "The Age of the Warrior"

Excellent*, but not for fans of US policy (over the last sixty years). Or even Blair's.


*so far. About 50 pages. Fear it may become repetitive later.



Quote:
This selection of his journalism finds him at full throttle as he inveighs against a host of familiar, but wholly deserving targets: Bush, Blair, the Iraq war, the insane Western policy towards the Middle East. His loathing of Blair, "this vain, deceitful man, this proven liar... who has the blood of thousands of Arab men, women and children on his hands", will strike a chord with millions. Fisk has an equal detestation of "Dubya" Bush, but by now there is nothing more to be said about a man whom history will surely judge as the worst US president ever.
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-en...sk-832693.html


Quote:
Fisk makes no apologies for favouring the downtrodden, asserting “we should be unbiased on the side of injustice”. He explains: “It’s not a football match, where you give 50% to each side. At the liberation of a Nazi extermination camp, you wouldn’t give equal time to the SS.”
Quote:
His outrage at the duplicity of Western politicians – and the media’s complicity with their lies – burns throughout his new book, The Age of the Warrior: Selected Writings, a collection of columns from five years
http://www.listener.co.nz/issue/3564...warriors_.html
.
This is computer generated drivel. No signature is required.
#2424 Aug 2nd, 2010, 20:37
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#2424
I don't mind Fisk the eye-witness reporter (his 'Pity the Nation', despite all its flaws, must be one of the great pieces of wartime journalism), although he is one of those guys who always just happens to be right there when the shit goes down (see here), and he has a habit of turning everything into a story about himself.

Can't stand him as a political analyst though. Fisk of course inspired the term 'fisking', I never tire of reading this Andrew Sullivan piece which highlights everything wrong with Fisk's approach. When it comes to journalism, I suspect Fisk sees reporting facts as a secondary obligation, behind supporting the 'victims' narrative, as perceived by him of course. Makes for intense and fascinating reading, but he's not one to be relied upon.
#2425 Aug 2nd, 2010, 20:43
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#2425
I am still trying to figure out (in the book) if he is misreporting facts. So far, I don't think so.

His interpretations are personal. One can take them or leave them, but his stuff makes much better reading than the embedded journalism that is so common these days- and the Western media's (and population's) increasing propensity to take everything their leaders say at face value. Iraq was born out of that.

But like I said, only 50 pages or so.


PS: I went to that Sullivan site, but his quote by Dick Cheney right up there put me off
#2426 Aug 4th, 2010, 19:31
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#2426
The God of Small Things --- Ten Years On.


OK, to be honest, I don't know how many years on, but I would have read the book when it was fairly new, and after I had been to India at least once.

Certainly, this time, I do not feel inclined to read it again, and may not do for quite a long time. Whilst I may have found her overblown English charming a decade ago, this time I found it rather tedious. Boy, does she love metaphors and similes, and Oh Boy, does she milk them for all they are worth. And she should take more care to get them right too: a piece of ground full of moons is lovely poetry, but surely one only sees one moon reflected in one puddle? I'll have to log that one for checking.

It is not, however, all bad. If a good editor had taken the red pen to some of the overblown sections, and persuaded her not to play the flashback/forwardflash time distortion so hard, it could be a pretty good story of death, tragedy and the ruining of lives in a dysfunctional family, such as one might meet anywhere in the world, with the added dimension of caste.

The Love laws. That lay down who should be loved. And how. And how much

It is not without its thoughts that stick. Actually, I really enjoyed the very end of the book. Just, this time, I found it harder work getting there.
#2427 Aug 4th, 2010, 19:54
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#2427
I just read John Marsden's book, Tomorrow when the war began. Yeah, it's for teenagers, but it was a fun read. The movie comes out soon, can't wait to see the locales where I grew up.
#2428 Aug 5th, 2010, 09:33
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#2428
I read all his books when they came out, even though for teenagers he's an excellent writer and they are easy, enjoyable reading! I must look out for the movie when I go back to Oz next year, I had no idea there was until I read your post, alouise, thanks for pointing this out.
#2429 Aug 5th, 2010, 09:39
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#2429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post The God of Small Things --- Ten Years On.
I really enjoyed the book when I read it about 10 years ago. But I suspect I should leave it at that and not pick it up again.
#2430 Aug 5th, 2010, 10:06
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#2430
It would be interesting to have another ten-years-on opinion from someone who liked it then!

Now I have begun J G Farrell's The Singapore Grip


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