Cobra Gypsies

#1 Apr 6th, 2015, 18:43
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
The Land of Enchantment. Soon.
Posts:
12,139
  • Sama is offline
#1
Cobra Gypsies


"Check out this beautiful documentary entitled COBRA GYPSIES directed by Raphael Treza. Up until watching this film, I never knew that the Romani still existed in India. This film is created in a way that the subjects do not seem to be exploited for a story, but are actually given a chance to have their voices heard..."
My India Photos, 2005-2017
"When you are truly genuine there will invariably be people who do not accept you. And in that case, you must be your own badass self, without apology." -- Katie Goodman
#2 Apr 6th, 2015, 22:35
Join Date:
Apr 2009
Location:
Almora
Posts:
6,840
  • jituyadav is offline
#2
Wonderful Sama, I will watch the documentary later, but the photographs are amazing. My first interaction with this tribe was way back in my childhood when some of them used to stay a few days close to our home in Delhi. Their lifestyle was perhaps the first major influence on my outlook towards life in general.
If you find my posts confrontationist, please bear, I am an old frustrated guy who has nothing better to do than sit on rocking chair and curse the world whole day
#3 Apr 6th, 2015, 23:17
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
The Land of Enchantment. Soon.
Posts:
12,139
  • Sama is offline
#3
I also love the photos....that little girl in orange in the last one reminds me of me at that age. messy hair and a look that says, "bring it on."
#4 Apr 7th, 2015, 02:24
Join Date:
Jan 2010
Location:
North Rhine-Westphalia
Posts:
7,130
  • Golghar is offline
#4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sama View Post Up until watching this film, I never knew that the Romani still existed in India.
These Indian "Gypsies" aren'r really Roma. The only ethnic group in the subcontinent that may be "Roma who stayed behind" are the Dumaki.
#5 Apr 7th, 2015, 03:04
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
The Land of Enchantment. Soon.
Posts:
12,139
  • Sama is offline
#5
what about the ? (a book recently recommended to me.)

(btw, not my quote!)
#6 Apr 7th, 2015, 03:13
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
70,824
  • Nick-H is offline
#6
I'm in the middle of some music, and there are not many words of information on the web page without watching the documentary. What tribe is this and where?

There is a tribe that specialises in snake catching down south here, the Irulas.

There is another that I curse regularly, because they steal, kill and eat cats, so the less said about them the better --- unless it's a curse!
#7 Apr 7th, 2015, 03:18
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
The Land of Enchantment. Soon.
Posts:
12,139
  • Sama is offline
#7
I read (somewhere, a long time ago) that the European Roma (Romani) were originally from North India (Rajasthan.)

The filmmaker says it the Kalbeliya translated as "those who love snakes."

"They are also known as Sapera, Jogira or Jogi. They follow Hinduism. They trace their ancestry from Kanlipar, the 12th disciple of Guru Gorakhnath. The largest number of the population of Kalbelias is in Pali district, then Ajmer, Chittorgarh and Udaipur district. They live a nomadic life and have belonged as members of the untouchable caste, shunned by mainstream society."
#8 Apr 7th, 2015, 03:21
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
70,824
  • Nick-H is offline
#8
Depending on who you talk to, everything is originally from India. Including nothing (zero). A lot of it probably is, too
#9 Apr 7th, 2015, 03:27
Join Date:
Jan 2006
Location:
Ireland
Posts:
5,303
  • JuliaF is offline
#9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sama View Post I read (somewhere, a long time ago) that the European Roma (Romani) were originally from North India (Rajasthan.)

They are but I don't think the present day Rabari are related to the Roma people. That is a great book though, and so is her other one about travelling across Australia with camels.

Golghar, what language(s) do the European Roma speak? And what links are there with Indian languages? All I know is that I knew an English woman of Gypsy stock who said that their word for thief is chor (when speaking English)
#10 Apr 7th, 2015, 04:08
Join Date:
Jan 2010
Location:
North Rhine-Westphalia
Posts:
7,130
  • Golghar is offline
#10
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuliaF View Post T
Golghar, what language(s) do the European Roma speak? And what links are there with Indian languages? All I know is that I knew an English woman of Gypsy stock who said that their word for thief is chor (when speaking English)
The Roma in Eastern and South-Eastern Europe still speak Romany, which in grammatical structure and vocabulary is recognizably an Indo-Aryan language. In the British Isles the last true Romany dialect died out some time in the last century. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh-Romani_language
There's a link to ROMLEX in the references. Click on the link for John Sampson too. He was an Irish linguist who documented the Welsh Romany dialect quite thoroughly. Apparently it survived longest in Welsh speaking areas and its speakers were all bilingual in Welsh and Romany.
What is now spoken by the so-called "Travellers" in Britain and Ireland is Shelta which is structurally English but with a large Romany lexical component. Similarly Spanish-Gypsy and other Gypsy languages of Western Europe are actually the local languages with a large number of Romany words.
#11 Apr 7th, 2015, 04:17
Join Date:
Mar 2005
Location:
The Land of Enchantment. Soon.
Posts:
12,139
  • Sama is offline
#11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post Depending on who you talk to, everything is originally from India.
Unless you're talking about human genetics.
#12 Apr 7th, 2015, 04:27
Join Date:
Jan 2006
Location:
Ireland
Posts:
5,303
  • JuliaF is offline
#12
Great stuff Golghar! I just read your link about Shelta - fascinating! I knew that lackeen means girl but had no idea that it was a back slang formation from cailín (colleen).
#13 Apr 7th, 2015, 17:39
Join Date:
Jan 2010
Location:
North Rhine-Westphalia
Posts:
7,130
  • Golghar is offline
#13
Read all about it . This was the first time I heard of Shelta (and Polari).
#14 Apr 7th, 2015, 18:03
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
70,824
  • Nick-H is offline
#14
Quote:
first time I heard of ... Polari
I hope you do make it to a July London meet: It will be so bona to vada your eek!

(I grew up on Kenneth Williams and co, but I was such a naive, sheltered child that I had no idea what it was all about. Apparently the BBC bigwigs were too!)
#15 Apr 8th, 2015, 23:21
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
70,824
  • Nick-H is offline
#15
It's odd how there is always a deathly silence when tribes that eat cats are mentioned. Nobody even says, "Shouldn't you post that in the Lunch thread?" or "Off Topic! Get ye to the Edible-Objects thread!"

Tribes... groovy... ethnic... preserving ancient ways and all that.

Wishing that one of them would get wiped out because they eat people's family (furry members)... I think that this falls into the black hole created by the collision, head on, of political correctness and despicable behaviour. Perhaps the Large Hadron Collider could investigate this one?

Similar Threads

Title, Username, & Date Last Post Replies Views Forum
Where do I find Karnataka gypsies? Jan 29th, 2007 22:25 8 4148 Goa
'Gypsies' in Kashmir Nov 11th, 2001 08:26 0 3927 Photography


Posting Rules

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Forum Rules»
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2
© IndiaMike.com 2018
Page Load Success