A Raj-era book reminds us of the pomp and glory of forgotten Indian soldiers

#1 Dec 7th, 2017, 21:50
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#1

Pioneers of the British Indian Army. | Alfred Crowdy Lovett. Wikimedia Commons [Public Domain]

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In December 1911, the Raj commemorated the Imperial Durbar in style, with King Emperor George V and Queen Mary present. In Delhi, the royals were treated to an impressive display of pomp and pageantry, with a ceremonial parade with regiments in their varied colours. The Raj was at its peak at the time and earlier that year, two dedicated and talented soldiers had published The Armies of India, a lavishly illustrated book with detailed text. Published under the Arthur and Charles Black imprint, the book saw several reprints and it still remains in print.

Alfred Crowdy Lovett, the book’s illustrator, had by this time, served in the army for thirty years. Born in 1863, he had received early encouragement for his drawings, winning third prize for a competition in the iconic British publication, Boy’s Own Paper. Growing up in Croydon, London, Lovett’s path appeared chosen, as was his father’s before him. James Lovett served as a high functionary in the postal department and was part of the increasingly creaky bureaucracy of a colonial empire.
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#2 Dec 7th, 2017, 23:27
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...The Armies of India, a lavishly illustrated book with detailed text. Published under the Arthur and Charles Black imprint, the book saw several reprints and it still remains in print....
Indeed so.

AndyD 8-)
There is no such thing as art, the best is high craft - the rest is just flim-flam ©
#3 Dec 7th, 2017, 23:53
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#3
The second picture appears to show a guy with a wheely case. Been around since 1910: who knew?


Boy's Own Paper. I remember that, but I don't remember it containing anything interesting. Do you recall it, a_f_d?
~
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#4 Dec 7th, 2017, 23:57
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post The second picture appears to show a guy with a wheely case. Been around since 1910: who knew?

Boy's Own Paper. I remember that, but I don't remember it containing anything interesting. Do you recall it, a_f_d?
I know the name, but I don't remember it - just Dandy, Beano, Eagle - and much approved by parents - The Childrens' Newspaper (Arthur Mee iirc).

AndyD 8-)
#5 Dec 8th, 2017, 00:55
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#5
Arthur Mee of The Childrens' Encyclopedia!* Had that!

Thought I'd met him, but Google says he died before I was born.

Back to the article...

A nice one for the Great Typos of Our Time collection: Theory of marital races



*That looks familiar too. Both around into the 60s: I recall one, the other, or maybe both. Not a regular reader, though. The Eagle was my thing. I'm getting flashbacks of un-modernised W H Smith.
#6 Dec 8th, 2017, 01:13
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The post-1858 martial races were the ones that helped put down the uprising by the pre-1857 martial races.
#7 Dec 8th, 2017, 04:11
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#7
A friend of mine read the Boys Own Paper, and I remember trying, aged about 14, to construct one of their basic short wave radio designs, the "Ether Ranger". Sadly, my ambitions were not matched by my abilities at that age.
I did go on to become a radio ham, and pirate radio operator. (Shush...)



Excuse quality of my photo, it looks about 100 years old, but is from the 1960's

Ed.
#8 Dec 8th, 2017, 04:23
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Amazing, Ed.
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Originally Posted by Golghar View Post The post-1858 martial races were the ones that helped put down the uprising by the pre-1857 martial races.
But who won the marital race?
#9 Dec 8th, 2017, 04:40
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post But who won the marital race?
You mean "Ge' me to the church on time" and all that?

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