Your favorite weave / print

#1 Jan 10th, 2018, 14:58
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#1
Hello Everyone

Through your wanderings in India, you may have come across and been tempted to buy hand made shawls, sarees, lunghi, kurta or other fabric. Was it handwoven? handprinted? Did you fall in love with the design? the color?

Perhaps you'd like to share a photograph here of what it was, where you bought it and anything else that made it unique.

I bought highgrown pashmina (from changthang) in Ladakh and kanchivaram silk saree from Kanchipuram during my travels ....

I'll post a photo when i can access my stash of photos.

till then, post away!

-V_A
#2 Jan 10th, 2018, 17:54
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#2
I am the same with cloth as with music. I love it, and love to enjoy its multiple textures and patterns --- but I know very little about it.

I can hardly escape knowing Kanchipuram silk, of course. It is a little puzzling that a quite heavy-weight fabric became the luxury wear of this hot and humid part of India!

On my first visit to India, I spent a fortune in a Kanchipuram shop. My purchases included two beautiful saris, which, after all the gifts had had been given, remained, often admired, but never worn, until I married Mrs N. I think that both, along with a couple of dozen other silk saris, were lost in the flood, but at least they got to see the light of day on special occasions before that! I guess that I paid thousands for them in 1997. I guess that the same thing today would cost tens of thousands.

One silk that I find particular intriguing is Tussar silk. It feels and handles more like paper, and even has a crinkly feeling if scrunched. I had some kurtas in interesting colours, that I used to wear when playing music in London.

Here in Chennai, I tend to agree with Mrs N that silk is really not the most ideal wear for our climate, and too prefer to stick to cotton. I also prefer to avoid high-maintenance clothes, and have long since tried to avoid anything with a dry-clean only label.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
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#3 Jan 10th, 2018, 18:04
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#3
Banarasi falls in the same category. I love the way it looks - and have absolutely no use for it. It wont be stitched into a shirt and a kurta /sherwani is ceremonial, perhaps once a year wear.

This last week of December, I went to a part of Jaipur that was once thriving. It's called Rajeev Gandhi Handloom Haveli (or similar). There were, at one point of time, six state govt emporiums. Now, there're two - the J&K one, that i find overpriced and a UP one, that was so sadly under-stocked - he had seven, yes, i could count them, pieces of fine banarasi. I've never seen such a good price for such an amazing banarasi - there was zari intricately woven through and through the sari. Sadly, I had no use for it and passed it up.

The weaves I find most fascinating all involve designs inspired from nature - typically flowers and mangoes - or animals - banarasi and kanchipuram in silk and nomadic rabari pieces from kutch and rajasthan.
#4 Jan 11th, 2018, 10:18
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#4
I will post some pictures. But first I need to take some. Maybe on the weekend.
#5 Feb 20th, 2018, 22:27
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Rogan josh: A dying art kept alive in a few enthusiastic households


Photo: Alamy

Quote:
Sumar Khatri sits cross-legged on the bare floor of his house. A blue plastic container that looks just like a simple spice box, found in most Indian kitchens, is lying open next to him. Inside, however, are an array of pigments soaked in water.

He works oblivious to his surroundings in what looks like a composed scene. He takes some of the yellow dye, places it on the heel of his hand and mixes it with a metal stylus.

Soon, the dye is malleable and can be stretched into a thin yellow string; it's like a conjurer performing magic with his wand. Khatri then places a piece of fabric on his now stretched legs and then twists, turns and pulls the dye coated stylus to place a floral motif on the cloth in seconds—without the stylus touching the fabric.

He is done soon with a couple of them, after which he slowly folds the cloth. When he unfolds it, an imprint of the design is found on the other side—an exact mirror image. One look at it and anyone would be tricked by the even design of the rogan art into thinking that it's printed work.

This is Nirona, a dusty, sleepy village near Bhuj in Gujarat where cows laze and children hop through its narrow streets. Mud houses with crumbling walls sport intricate facades that once stood majestic.

I had travelled by road from Ahmedabad the day before and halted at Bhuj, the district headquarters of Kutch, for the night. The seven-hour drive had taken me through the semi-arid zone of Kutch—acacias in the scrubland, forage grasses in the Banni grasslands, vast fields of castor and, of course, the ubiquitous salt pans. The Tropic of Cancer running across the district implies hot weather conditions and an average annual rainfall of just around 350mm.
Livemint
#6 Mar 13th, 2018, 21:47
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#6

The life of a weaver


One of Abdullah’s designs

Quote:
“If you weave good pieces, you will get good returns, this is what I feel,” says Abdullah, whose words belie his 37 years. He is the recepient of the Sutrakar Samman Award 2017, which is presented annually by the Delhi Craft Council to a weaver for his innovation and skill

Abdullah is from Mubarakpur, a small town about 13 km from Azamgarh in Uttar Pradesh. Mubarakpur has been the bastion of Benares sari weaving. Over the years, it seemed to be losing its significance, but timely interventions have led to renewed interest among the weavers and consumers.

Passion for the loom

Abdullah has been weaving for over 25 years. What marks him out is his unceasing love for the loom and the willingness to learn. “Thankfully there have never been any complaints about my work. I have had long stints with master weavers who used to love my creations, I have worked independently and now I work with a SHG. I believe in my work.” His specialty is the khadua or weaving the brocaded borders and motifs for which Benarasis are known. “Khadna or khadai on the loom which is done using small attachments or tillis give that brocaded look. We have to see if the threads are uniformly drawn; they should not criss cross.”

Abdullah started weaving when he was 11; he learnt the technique from his father. His sisters would work on the brocaded pieces and he learnt from them. In a year or so, he was proficient enough to weave a sari on his own. When he was 20, he installed two hand looms in his house. “I used to buy the yarn and do my own designs. My saris had many takers.” However, when market conditions deteriorated it hit the weavers hard. Master weavers make saris for traders from Benares. Their earnings depend on what the buyer fixes. Wages for weavers are not high. “Gradually I learnt what works and what doesn’t in the market. I also mastered the technique with the help of the master weavers with whom I worked. Today I can make any pattern, if you show me the design I can replicate it,” says Abdullah, who takes immense pride in his work.
Hindu
#7 Mar 14th, 2018, 09:48
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#7
Quote:
Rogan josh
Wow, I thought this was a foodie thread. Do they still have this in Srinagar, Rishta.?

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