Art / Antique purchase and valuation
vaibhav_arora
India > Indian Culture and Traditions > Community Forums > Arts in India
#16
| Maha Guru Member
#5 is wrong and right. There is a thriving sales market. Its rather baffling to me that one would say otherwise unless one isn't buying. There are some beautiful things out there. Personally I always wanted a decorative door. When my rich uncle buys that shipping company I can afford to get it sent here. In the meantime I'll stick to metalware from Maharashtra, an interest I shared with Raja Kelkar, and stray items like a sandstone head of Buddha from a ways back when I was an antique dealer, and my collection of district gazzateers. However, I have thrice seen buildings in India with antique furniture inside demolished. One time I was in a position to intervene and didn't and will carry that regret to my grave. Now I have to think of how to find good homes for items that few people would recognize or value. Do they even collect physical books in libraries anymore? Do I send them to the University of Chicago's South Asia library to repay a vast debt to a departed, truly famous and generous librarian or to the University. I know the University collects books and virtually anything like a drunk does drinks. Sad to think of it. But collecting is not rational and rarely starts with any notion of an end game..
#17
| Humble servant of the self

Originally posted by: edwardseco View Post

There is a thriving sales market. Its rather baffling to me that one would say otherwise unless one isn't buying.


Oh I have seen the market, and it is way way below its potential. The reason I mentioned is that people do not understand the value of old stuff in their backyard, why, because there is no large scale marketplace for such items, why because no one wants to spend money in creating such an infrastructure as the returns are a big 'if'...in short, it is a vicious cycle.

Of course, other important reason for no market of antiques older than 100 years is the 'The Antiquities and Art Treasures Act, 1972'. If anyone wants, one can download the official pdf, or read about it Here.

Now there is a 'new Antiquities and Art treasures regulation, export and import bill, 2017' waiting to be made into law. When that happens, I will be damned if a country with more than 4K years of continuous civilisation, much of which is adventurous with art and war developing side by side, does not have a antique shop at every corner.
If you find my posts confrontationist, please bear, I am an old frustrated guy who has nothing better to do than sit on rocking chair and curse the world whole day
#18
| Humble Genius
I think once that law happens, fakes will be much more commonplace. I have a story to type up sometime from last November when an otherwise reputable silver jewelr in Jaisalmer attempted to sell a purportedly old tirthankara statue to me. Furious googling and basic knowledge of select pali words and Hindi numerals saved me...I'll post a photo sometime.
#19
| Humble servant of the self

Originally posted by: vaibhav_arora View Post

I think once that law happens, fakes will be much more commonplace.


They still are, at least 80% if not more. Once the law is passed, there will be easily accessible legal ways to authenticate artifacts, so the fakes will come down and not go up.
If you find my posts confrontationist, please bear, I am an old frustrated guy who has nothing better to do than sit on rocking chair and curse the world whole day

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