Taj Mahal cuts (Indian) visitor numbers

#1 Jan 4th, 2018, 19:16
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FYI. In the Telegraph paper.
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#2 Jan 4th, 2018, 19:32
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Certainly I feel there are issues with "crowd control" in India. I went to the border ceremony near Amritsar recently, and felt that the crowd surges as the event finished were on the verge of generating injuries.

Making it harder/more expensive for Indian folk to visit chimes with the local chief ministers wish to down grade the site as a major tourist attraction, I guess...

Given the lack of care shown to other historical sites by both custodians and visitors, I hope the Taj Mahal will recieve the care and respect it deserves.

Ed.
#3 Jan 4th, 2018, 19:34
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Here the same story in the Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...-mahal-cap-day

I am no huge Taj fan, but I know from other sites where Indians get in practically for free, what impact that has.
and here the limit is just 40'000 per day.... Holy cow... what a torture to go there with that many people present. I am glad I don't have to go there any more.
#4 Jan 4th, 2018, 19:56
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#4
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldandRambling View Post I hope the Taj Mahal will recieve the care and respect it deserves.

Ed.
Em, yes, I agree, the respect that this monument deserves is that at least there should be a plaque commemorating the untold suffering cast on its actual builders, all the suffering that the people who were enslaved by this self-enamored creep who built this had to endure (I hold the same view regarding all the great monuments on earth, by whomever they were built and whichever alleged great name they perpetuate.)

quote from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shah_J...gious_attitude :
Religious attitude


Under Shah Jahan, the reaction by the orthodox Muslims to the policies of Akbar and Jahangir had an effect for the first time.[41] He was more radical in his thinking than his father and grandfather. Upon his accession, he adopted new policies which reversed Akbar's treatment of non-Muslims. In 1633, his sixth regnal year, Shah Jahan began to impose his interpretation of Sharia provisions against construction or repair of churches and temples. After learning that wealthy Hindus wished to complete several unfinished temples in Benares, he ordered all new temples in the city to be destroyed.
#5 Jan 4th, 2018, 19:59
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I am sure that in none too distant future there will be a blanket ban on Indians to enter into any place of importance, and very justifiably too . Just a couple of weeks back I saw one young mother getting her kid to urinate on one of the monuments inside Red Fort. The guard guffawed and that was that. If we want the monuments and jungles to survive , we have to ensure that only people who appreciate the value of such places, and not every picnicker, do enter them. I am writing out of bilious disappointment.
#6 Jan 4th, 2018, 20:07
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YES!! Implement it quickly!

Actually, even 40K is too much. If Forbidden City (72 hectares) can limit visitors to 80K, maximum visitors to Taj (17 hectares) should be 20K.
#7 Jan 4th, 2018, 21:36
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40000 Indian visitors divided in 2 slots of 20000 each. Children will also be considered in the count.

Once the 20000 numbers is crossed Indians who want to see the Taj will have to wait for the afternoon slot or shell out Rs 1000/- per person.

If one wants to see the crypt they need to shell out Rs 100/- over and above the Rs 40/-. For the Rs 1000/- I don't think there is any restrictions.
#8 Jan 4th, 2018, 22:50
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Was in Andalucia- Spain this year. The ALHAMBRA OF GRANADA and other places in spain limit the number of visitors so to conserve the place,you buy ticket in advance and you have a slot when allowed to enter,did not make on time hard luck.
Would it work in India?
#9 Jan 4th, 2018, 23:35
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Absolutely! Everyone in India knows how to get train tickets, which is a 100% computerised process. A Taj booking should only take a tiny fraction of the computing power of the railway booking system.
#10 Jan 5th, 2018, 00:45
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I seemed to see many thousands of passengers queing at train ticket counters to buy their "computerised" tickets. I would hate to think this will be another example of the poor being denied access, just by dint of being poor...?

Ed
#11 Jan 5th, 2018, 03:51
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This is nothing new. Many countries contemplate restrictions in face of manifold increase in visitors. NPS (National Park Service) every year debates this very issue.

Some parks have introduced surge pricing as a way to modulate visitors, and other places like Dubrovnik, simple say no, when the capacity is reached.

There is a park upstate that just blocks the access road to incoming vehicles, once the number is reached.

Rs 1000 is surge pricing
#12 Jan 5th, 2018, 12:35
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#12
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldandRambling View Post I seemed to see many thousands of passengers queing at train ticket counters to buy their "computerised" tickets. I would hate to think this will be another example of the poor being denied access, just by dint of being poor...?
While this statement honors you, it is not really thought through. Which poor are you talking about? The poor of Agra? Because the others do not have the funds to travel, let alone spend time with a useless work of art, they need both for daily survival. Daily wage earners, construction workers, maids, laborers in factories, farmers with just two or three buffaloes live in a different world, the world of immediate reality, not of some insane invented thought-out world which honors art(ificial) stuff.

If we show interest in what they accidentally create as art, like their music, their singing and dancing, (also the beauty in their clothing, in building natural houses) it is invariably an expression of their zest for life, something that art people rarely can duplicate. Art is an imitated level of life, as much as this statement goes against the grain of cultural perceptions. For the poor there is no art, it is only for the rich who have time to waste.
#13 Jan 5th, 2018, 13:49
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#13
Quote:
Originally Posted by atala View Post While this statement honors you, it is not really thought through. Which poor are you talking about? The poor of Agra? Because the others do not have the funds to travel, let alone spend time with a useless work of art, they need both for daily survival. Daily wage earners, construction workers, maids, laborers in factories, farmers with just two or three buffaloes live in a different world, the world of immediate reality, not of some insane invented thought-out world which honors art(ificial) stuff.

If we show interest in what they accidentally create as art, like their music, their singing and dancing, (also the beauty in their clothing, in building natural houses) it is invariably an expression of their zest for life, something that art people rarely can duplicate. Art is an imitated level of life, as much as this statement goes against the grain of cultural perceptions. For the poor there is no art, it is only for the rich who have time to waste.

That is a provocative and quite arrogant statement that there is no art for the poor. I am not sure that I agree with you. What about the daily kolam or rangoli ?
#14 Jan 5th, 2018, 14:42
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#14
Quote:
Originally Posted by atala If we show interest in what they accidentally create as art, like their music, their singing and dancing, (also the beauty in their clothing, in building natural houses) it is invariably an expression of their zest for life ...
Perhaps he should have stopped there. I think I understand his intention, though, to say something like that museums and monuments do not figure very much in the life of many poor people, and they are certainly not going to pay to travel and see them.

They may, though, travel far, and at a cost disproportionate to their income, to visit such things as temples, great and small --- for non-touristic* reasons.



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#15 Jan 5th, 2018, 15:21
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#15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post They may, though, travel far, and at a cost disproportionate to their income, to visit such things as temples, great and small --- for non-touristic* reasons.*
Must admit it was many years ago when we visited the Taj Mahal, at that time there were loads of buses and what seemed to us thousands of Muslim pilgrims with all their gear, bedrolls, cooking utensils,food and all that was needed for a long trip over many many days and weeks to Muslim holy sites for them in India.We met them at the Taj and another place (forgotten where). You could see that they were from the poorer lot of pilgrims and possible may have been a trip of their lifetime but they had saved up and off they went.
Met when flying from Doha to India another lot pilgrims from Bihar who had gone to Mecca on pilgrimage tho they did get financial help from a rich Bihari businesses man. For them it a wish come true

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