Overwintering in India. Where to start?
OldandRambling
India > India Travel > India Travel Itinerary Advice
#16
| Loud Noisy Bird

Overwintering in India. Where to start?

Not necessarily. Could be fairly normal local. Let's see air BnB for Chennai.
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Life gets aadhar every day.
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#17
| Maha Guru Member
When I stayed for a winter in Goa, I searched for community groups on Facebook. Stumbled across one that was an ex-pat group and there were loads of accomodation on offer at near local prices (I paid 15,000 a month for a one bed apartment with balcony, pool, gym etc).

Appreciate the likelihood of success is much higher in a place like Goa, but even places like Ernakulam, Madurai & Mysore should have community and/or ex-pat groups on social media.

Good luck!

NB
"See the World, then see India - because the World is an anti-climax"
#18
| Senior Member
I was just in Kovalam and Varkala for several weeks myself and it's not hard at all to let other foreigners and local people know you're looking for something long-term.

On the other hand, you might decide to just work out a long-stay arrangement with a hotel. A lot simpler and hotels are usually close to the restaurant areas.

As for cooking, shopping for food in the resort areas is not very convenient unless you take transport into the city. Eating out is far and away the better choice.
#19
| Senior Member
Consider serviced apartments - they may come with basic furniture and cooking facilities. You can search in 99acres.com & magicbricks.com for getting an idea. Look for properties advertised by owners.
#20
| 10 yrs in India
One important consideration for me is the quality of the food available in a winter-home. I prefer it to be as closely as possible to organic. I see that only in Auroville consistently made available. That's why I could only stay there for longer times, if in India.
#21
| Clueless

Originally posted by: OldandRambling View Post



Living on the basic UK retirement pension as I do, maybe the idea is a non starter from a finances perspective?

Any thoughts welcomed!

Ed.


Make a list of what you expect to require for a longer stay, and what takes your fancy ? e.g

  • Gated community..
  • Walk to public transportation...
  • Within XYZ miles from an international airport
  • Each and affordable access to doctors and pharmacies.
  • ...
  • ...
  • Inexpensive services/power backup/etc


and in those months...

  • Plenty of backpacker hangouts
  • German/European Bakeries.
  • Parks and Gardens
  • Entertainment options.
  • Museums.
  • Good brews.


Then run it through multiple sources, both electronic and human, and you will find a couple of locations that fit the bill.

For the price of two pints of Ale, you should take out a classified advertisement in popular English Language Newspaper.

Enjoy your stay !!!

OR

Do as my friend does - He stays where his current bae stays !

SIMPLE ANSWER: Yes, Affordable with careful research !
#22
| Chingona y Curandera

When I was in Goa last trip I met MANY old Brits and Aussies who stayed for months at a time (3, 4 or longer) in flats close to Patnem beach, not in beach shacks.  I loved my flat, a 5 min. walk to the beach, and it had a nice kitchen. Lucky for me I met someone who loved cooking for me. :)

I was there in December and frankly, did not find Patnem area to be very touristy at all. Not that it wouldn't get that way but I found it bearable.

 Message me if you want the name of where I stayed.

I did not spend a lot of time inside but I'd stay at the place again.
I would also get a flat in Panjim in a heartbeat.

Cochin also if given a choice and Varkala always has flats/houses available to rent. This was a few years ago but I was offered a Varkala house for 20,000 a month.

There is always plenty to find in India on airbnb.
My India Photos, 2005-2017
"When you are truly genuine there will invariably be people who do not accept you. And in that case, you must be your own badass self, without apology." -- Katie Goodman
#23
| Maha Guru Member
#21

Left out a few very important items, good chocolate and craft beer not just kingfisher and most important a variety of good bookshops. Good universities/colleges and Institutes are a big plus. Either way it clearly points to Delhi preferably near a Metro stop in the South:.

I left out Punjabi cooking for which I should be whipped..
#24
| Chingona y Curandera

Originally posted by: edwardseco View Post

Either way it clearly points to Delhi preferably near a Metro stop in the South:.


Why would he want to stay in Delhi in the winter when it's cold and with its god awful pollution?! :ThumbsDow

jeez, the few I know in Delhi go to Goa for the winter!
My India Photos, 2005-2017
"When you are truly genuine there will invariably be people who do not accept you. And in that case, you must be your own badass self, without apology." -- Katie Goodman
#25
| Member
Head deep south, Kerala and Tamil Nadu are the best.

If you are doing cities, India now has rental sites (for Indians) and you can get a 1 bedroom apt for 10-15K per month. Houses you can get starting around 20-25K.

I do 3.5 months a year and even with a lot of hotels its cheaper than home.
#26
| Member
For north, check out Ellora, work out something for long term in one of the cottages at Ellora heritage
#27
| Maha Guru Member
That part of Maharashtra can get pretty hot. Delhi isn't without such. Snow birds can move to cooler and warmer climes as need be instead of having to suffer. Thus, no one place will suffice except for Nick. Be migratory..
#28
| Member
I'd consider all factors/requirements and zero in two places for a week trial run and then select one.

My preference will be Goa and Kerala. Some places in Goa were very nice with lot of facilities, cool cafes and even organic restaurants.
#29
| Humble Genius

Originally posted by: WyoFly View Post


I do 3.5 months a year and even with a lot of hotels its cheaper than home.


I'm very curious about this aspect. To you, or anyone else who's ok to share some details -
1. What factors in the snowbound countries contribute to a higher cost?
2. What is the range of such costs?
#30
| Maha Guru Member

Originally posted by: vaibhav_arora View Post

I'm very curious about this aspect. To you, or anyone else who's ok to share some details -
1. What factors in the snowbound countries contribute to a higher cost?
2. What is the range of such costs?


I think the day to day cost of living can simply be much less in India, rather than any large extra costs elsewhere in winter. One has to pay to heat ones home, but I think for me it is the warmth and sunshine that is the reason to go away... If one can do it for the same or less cost as staying at home, so much the better. :D

(Just as a matter of interest, my average UK electric costs for cooking and heating is £20 a week.)

Ed.