Where to study Yoga?!

#1 Jul 13th, 2010, 00:07
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#1
Greetings all!
I am a young woman heading to India in Oct of this year to study yoga somewhere, but I am so overwhelmed! There are thousands of ashrams! I am looking for a place where I can study for 2-3 months, that has at least 3 or 4 hours of asana daily, along with philosophy, meditation and pranayama classes. Although I do not plan on teaching yoga, I would consider doing a Teacher Training if it is a good program. I am an ashtanga student, however I am looking to broaden my yoga practice, and do not necessarily want to limit myself to only ashtanga teachers.

Can anyone help me narrow down my choices? Does anyone have any recommendations? Help!

Cheers,
Cadence
#2 Jul 13th, 2010, 04:06
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#2
First of all don't expect to find "genuine" yoga in India. Asana yoga is very global and the same everywhere be it India, Europe or America. Styles are different.

The major advice I can give you: go to places which are considered to be "the capitals of yoga". They are Rishikesh ( the Himalayas) and Mysor ( ashtanga yoga capital). The advantage of these places is that you can easily find several accessible classes of yoga and also different styles, many students of yoga ( some of them yoga instructors from other countries) and everything in a compact space. If you don't like one class you may switch to another or you can easily combine them.

To my opinion hatha yoga ( ashtanga, Iyengar etc.) usually is not studied in ashrams. Ashrams are more about rituals, sacral texts, meditation. Therefore you won't be able to get everything in one package. Every aspect you've written about you'll have to learn from different places.Pranayama is only given in very small doses, asanas at basic to intermediate levels and access to meditations in ashrams is not easy.

Actually you may get everything in one package at places which are now becoming popular which are called retreats. Very nice and expensive they provide yoga, meditation, aurvedic massage, spa, manicure, pedicure,nice cuisine etc.
#3 Jul 13th, 2010, 05:50
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Yeah, that is about what I have found doing research... Thats why I am considering a Teacher Training intensive to get it all at once. I dont want to go to some resort retreat, though. Not only do i not have that kind of money but I am looking for a little bit more of an authentic experience than that. I have been looking at a few Teacher Trainings in Mysore, Goa and Rishikesh, anyone been to any they would recommend?
#4 Jul 13th, 2010, 09:47
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Mysore is the place for Ashtanga. There are also many pranayama classes, and lots of teacher training courses. There is of course the famous Ashtanga Yoga Institute which I consider over-rated.

Try the Mysore Mandala (they have a website as well) for pranayama classes, and ask around there for a teacher training courses. Many teachers do either through the Mandala (I think but don't remember) or privately.

Sheshadri is an amazing private ashtanga teacher, I studied with him for a while.
There must be more to life than having everything. - Maurice Sendak
#5 Jul 13th, 2010, 09:49
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i hope you are be visiting india on tourist vias, do not mention that your purpose is yoga in india, not many places take tourists on their regular schedule,
regards,
baba.
#6 Jul 13th, 2010, 10:10
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California, US, Tamarindo del Daria, CR, UWS, New York City.
#7 Jul 13th, 2010, 18:11
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#7
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadence View Post Greetings all!
I would consider doing a Teacher Training if it is a good program.

Can anyone help me narrow down my choices? Does anyone have any recommendations? Help!

Cheers,
Cadence
Try Googling Bihar School of Yoga.KK
#8 Jul 13th, 2010, 20:43
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Originally Posted by cadence View Post Thats why I am considering a Teacher Training intensive to get it all at once.
People do Teacher Training Intensives mainly to get a sertificate so that they can find a job as yoga teachers. So your choices are very narrow. You'll have to stick to ashtanga (or Iyengar) tradition if you want a teacher training course.

To my opinion all these teacher training courses were the answer to the demand from the western people. They contain a big deal of compromise and very much business oriented.

I think you'll get disappointed when you see that trio asanas+pranayama+meditation is not really present in "genuine" traditional hinduism.

My verdict: yoga in India is the same yoga which is taught around the world but only in exotic environment with specific atmosphere.
#9 Jul 14th, 2010, 12:51
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#9
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliminator View Post People do Teacher Training Intensives mainly to get a sertificate so that they can find a job as yoga teachers. So your choices are very narrow. You'll have to stick to ashtanga (or Iyengar) tradition if you want a teacher training course.
I don't understand, does this imply that only those two have TTC programs?
#10 Jul 17th, 2010, 00:26
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I accept that some places in India no longer teach yoga the way they did 50 years ago, due to western influence and everything. But I refuse to believe that there is nowhere I can go to study in an authentic environment. Has anyone actually done any yoga Teacher Trainings that they can recommend?
#11 Jul 17th, 2010, 08:22
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I just emailed my friend who completed his teacher training in Mysore, I'll let you know more about it.

But the words "authentic environment" and "yoga Teacher Trainings" are mutually exclusive. I'm guessing you are hoping for an English friendly class? These classes have been set up for westerners who come to India to study yoga. There's nothing more "authentic" about them than anywhere else, besides having an Indian teacher. You should be prepared for that.

What I would suggest is pick a location where there is a lot of yoga in one place (Mysore is very easy and a wonderful city). Try out a few classes, talk to people, and feel out the environment of a few schools and teachers before you commit to one. In Mysore start with the Mandala (mandala.ashtanga.org) to see what you really want to do (they have tons of classes) and network with other yoga students.
#12 Jul 17th, 2010, 12:03
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cadence View Post I accept that some places in India no longer teach yoga the way they did 50 years ago, due to western influence and everything. But I refuse to believe that there is nowhere I can go to study in an authentic environment.
To my understanding the idea of teacher training classes was from the beginning western-oriented. Indians had never such a thing like teacher training class. In Indian tradition you have to find a guru and then get initiated. That's how it is supposed to be.

So the only way for you is to study together with other foreigners from an indian teacher and pretend that it is an authentic environment. Actually even indians themselves go through teacher training courses so what the problem? Yeah, it may sound strange but Indians also can't find "authentic" yoga in their country.
#13 Jul 17th, 2010, 12:11
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#13
One word. Yoga is more about practice than learning?
#14 Jul 17th, 2010, 13:33
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Originally Posted by karnail View Post One word. Yoga is more about practice than learning?
"Practice, and all is coming."
-Sri K. Pattabhi Jois
#15 Jul 17th, 2010, 19:18
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Originally Posted by karnail View Post One word. Yoga is more about practice than learning?
That's 7 words!! KK
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