Exploring pavati valley

#1 Jul 8th, 2012, 01:38
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  • sidred22 is offline
#1
1. It may be an oxymoron to suggest that our initial intent was to reach the apex of Parbati Valley wherein the massive Parbati river is still in its infancy rather than crossing over through the highly coveted Pin Parbati pass and onto the pastures of Spiti valley. But rather by a quirk of fate and the destiny of divine , it may be concluded that we reached a point across the massive ranges and atop the unmarked pass over the Parvati glacier unscathed that even the glory of scaling the famed Pin Parvati Pass could not have afforded us greater pleasure and farther satisfaction than we felt having reached where we did before reverting back , not due to the lack of resoluteness but due to the lack of equipment which was required to scale the hanging glaciers and vertical precipices.

2. To narrate this nine days of exploratory trek may require words which may not justify the challenges endured during this trek but as they say, all well that ends well and when we reverted back the numerical strength of three was exactly similar to the figure that entered those moraines, ice walls, rock falls, rogue boulders, crevices, glaciers and ice debris.
Last edited by sidred22; Jul 8th, 2012 at 07:01..
#2 Jul 8th, 2012, 16:13
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  • vaibhav_arora is offline
#2
CA note: out of curiosity, is this a trip report that you're starting? If so, please let me know and i can edit the title appropriately. thanks
#3 Jul 9th, 2012, 00:01
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#3

Thumbs up

1. Well briefly, it started of as a mundane trip with the initial objective to cross over Pin Parbati towards Kaza and beyond. However in a major gaffe or on hindsight a streak of coincidental occurances, the trek took us beyond through the barriers of many miles of moraines into the forlorn valleys of Parbati glacier, the route to which does not exist and cannot be created mainly due to the self inflcited scars and tumult by nature itself which transcend the rationale of reason and needs to be traversed to be believed.

2. It is here that the conundrum of space and time loses its sanctity and the distance although meager (by conventional trekking standards)are measured in terms of steps one takes without inflicting permanent damage to oneself .i.e slip into deep icy crevices, rock falls , etc. Anyways 90/100 times one may manage to scrape through but the factor of chance and luck may play a major role. ( Locals later told us various uncorroborated stories. fabricated myths and sad tales pertaining to this area)

3. Once at the snout of the Parbati glacier, the Parabti valley is a cul-de-sac with a wall of high ice covered mountains (mother ridge) blocking the frontal approach but it opens up on both sides towards east and west with negotiable approaches (specially during this time of year when crevices haven't open up precariously).

4. We continued along the eastern arm of the valley, ascending gradually along the firm glacier snow. This approach is dominated by two parallel ridge with heights varying upto and over 6000m. Traversing at a snail pace for few hours along the centre spur, the valley is blocked by a series of pinnacles and pass which is characterised by vertical ice wall several hundred feet high and needing technical skills and equipment to negotiate it. However despite being blocked frontally the valley once again swerves north leading to a broad shoulder high pass after a mile of snow field dominated by various visible fractures on the firm ice (which are likely to open up to become deep crevices.

5. THis unmarked/unmapped pass (as mentioned earlier) in the horizon is easily negotiable if looked slantingly but as I have mentioned, the snow field is fractured at innumerable locations all along the ascent and we were lucky because the thaw had yet to set in to cause undue concern. So after six days of hopelessly wandering and seeking a veritable pass to cross over and overcome the ennui of having to move along the entire length of Parvati valley, we were glad to reach the apex of this pass which according to my PROTREK watch measured 5000m. But once on this pass, the size and flatness on the top, which may measure no less than one and half football fields, did enamour us to this haunting locale but what came as a shock was the vertical precipice on the reverse slope.

6. So before last light we reverted back and pitched our tents firmly, way below the pass at a safe distance from falling boulders, rouge ice falls and likely avalanches. Luckily, the sound of few avalanches in vicinity despite causing concern did not dampen those primoridial instincts and we swore a recee to find a way once again early on the morrow. The night as usual is dark, dreary and bone chilling at such locales but the next day the folly of not having taken adequate rope and few ice and rock pitons dawned upon us as despite the slim probability of descending along the reverse side, we decided by a vote of majority to retrace our steps and revert back. The likely rationale for the same as adduced during that hour of hot discussion was that the haversacks were heavy,balance jittery , and the propensity to suffer the probable casualties due to a any contingency was non-existent since the scope of any aid was atleast a week away and our geographical position was unknown (till recently) even to us leave alone the remainder of the world.

7. SO once again descending along the moraine belt and ice walls, the damage suffered due to accidental falls by the majority of the team was irreparable but not serious enough to hamper our move back. Once beyond this area, we analysed the losses and injuries realsitically only to realise that crossing that ubiquitous PIN-PARBATI pass was untenable and no more requisite since as Tennyson once said " they came through the jaws of death and through the mouth of hell" and maybe omens were just not favorable and gods of those lofty mountains did not desire that we transcend the pass we had set out for.
#4 Jun 1st, 2013, 01:37
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  • ans87 is offline
#4
you went without a guide ?!!
#5 Jun 1st, 2013, 13:51
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#5
We went with a Nepali porter who said he knew the route as he had done it before from the other side. However, beyond Mantalai he did not know the route.

However, a month later I returned and trekked up to the Pin Pass from the Mudh side without a guide :
http://sathyastravels.blogspot.in/20...g-la-trek.html

cheers
sathya
#6 May 23rd, 2015, 07:47
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