Dangerous Animals in Himalaya

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#16 Jul 11th, 2009, 19:59
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#16
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Originally Posted by livinhimalayas View Post Well dogs are easy prey for Leopards, specially the strays. Every year during winter (when most sheep/goats come down from the high meadows and there is scarcity of prey) the leopards come down to the river valley and the village dogs start disappearing or turning up with horrendous wounds after fights with leopards.
Last year our village lost three good dogs to leopards and we lost two that had dared to do into the forest after dusk.
BTW, despite all the stories from Jim Corbett and others, there are few leopards that turn maneaters or attack humans. Normally they will hide and observe humans but not really attack them.
Leopards cannot enter a house with solid walls and good doors and windows. What do you need an electrified fence for Wind Chariot?
In case you are still too scared of it make sure that there are no trees anywhere in the vicinity of the fence, the leopards can climb up trees and them jump over the fence.
Electric fence stuff was meant as a joke. I had several experiences of living in a forest with leopards around (as part of camping) . In those cases, I had just a layer of plain cloth as a protection between me and a leopard
#17 Jul 11th, 2009, 20:53
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#17
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Originally Posted by jituyadav View Post I have had my share of close encounters with wildlife in Himalayas. One incident happened around about 13 or 14 years back that is still fresh in my memory. It’s a long story but to cut it short, I was on one of my lousy adrenaline assisted adventure and was passing through the forest of chopta around 7 pm. It was almost dark and just as I stopped for few minutes of break close to a tree, I saw a leopard as close as three feet in front of me. I stayed at my place without moving but looking directly in eyes of the leopard. After about few centuries (yes it seemed that much to me), the leopard moved away and I carried on with my trek in absolute darkness and reached chopta around 10 pm.
As for you staying in wilderness, I agree with Per, if you can survive humans, you can survive the jungles
I am always advised its better not to stare at the animal directly when in the confrontation because the animal might think you are challenging him by looking straight in his eyes.

Now I am confused. What's the right strategy? Whether to look straight in the eyes while standing still or to retreat silently backward (but not showing him your back)?
#18 Jul 11th, 2009, 21:41
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I'm always eager to sight Leopard uncle, peering uphill with binoculars or sitting quietly at dusk - Leopard is so beautiful, graceful and the master Yogi of stealth that he could be a few paces away and you'll never know it . So there's not mush concern about being grabbed and difficult to corner a Leopard in the jungle!! I don't really think Leopard considers anything a challenge to his claws and jaws... If one has time to experiment - Does one lie on one's back in submission if for example, an unfriendly Rottweiler is slavering down upon one?? What would R do?
#19 Jul 11th, 2009, 21:59
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#19

Talking

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Originally Posted by livinhimalayas View Post Well dogs are easy prey for Leopards, specially the strays.
In case you are still too scared of it make sure that there are no trees anywhere in the vicinity of the fence, the leopards can climb up trees and them jump over the fence.

What of people to whom you have advised to grow bamboo and built
House with it , planting 3 to 4 trees around it.

Some time back a strayed leopard was captured by zoo people from pucca home in posh sector of gurgoan, near delhi.Poor creature was hiding in their bathroom for whole night.
#20 Jul 11th, 2009, 22:10
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#20
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Originally Posted by cityMONK View Post What of people to whom you have advised to grow bamboo and built House with it , planting 3 to 4 trees around it.

Some time back a strayed leopard was captured by zoo people from pucca home in posh sector of gurgoan, near delhi.Poor creature was hiding in their bathroom for whole night.
I think she was being tongue in cheek! Bamboo would also be a bit drafty, more suited for Mowgli. Poor animal indeed, there was that disgusting news episode of those Kashmiri people animals somewhere, gleefully beating a Leopard to death and also setting fire to a Bear -

http://carnivorecology.free.fr/pdf/leopardgarhwal.PDF
#21 Jul 11th, 2009, 22:16
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#21
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Originally Posted by Per View Post Without the slightest doubt, most dangerous are Homo Sapiens, followed by dogs, Tibetan mastifs can be lethal.
Those animals aren't as dangerous as mosquitoes. They kill far more people every year than man and dog combined.
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Last edited by Haylo; Jul 11th, 2009 at 23:37..
#22 Jul 11th, 2009, 22:32
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#22
Guys, has anyone ever experienced a tiger in the himalaya outside the tiger reserves?? or ever heard of it in recent times ?
#23 Jul 11th, 2009, 22:43
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Most Pahari's say Sher (Tiger) rather than (Guldar = Leopard)or Bagh, which can mean both (Panther & L. - confusing) or even Baghera - so though they would have seen something, and that is very common locally, even in daytime - One is fairly convinced tehy saw a Leopard. Oh it had stripes - Nah i don't believe it. Of course Tiger was dominant in Garhwal a very long time back. Frederick Wilson, the Raja of Harsil (1816-83, writes of Tiger.
#24 Jul 11th, 2009, 23:03
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#24
well i have 'Man-eaters of Kumaon' and 'Temple tiger and more man-eaters of Kumaon' from Jim Corbett. I certainly know 'how' common tiger was in Garhwal and Kumaon region just over a hundread years ago...

So, i guess they are not at all present in the regions except for the tiger reserves?
#25 Jul 11th, 2009, 23:31
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#25
never got to know about tigers outside reserve. many times heard about leopards (tendua) around gopeshwar and mandal. the road from chopta to chamoli is also famous for leopard sightings.. i have never seen
http://wotnews.com/like/leopard_kill...hamoli/684974/
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/H...ow/4392623.cms
#26 Jul 11th, 2009, 23:41
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#26
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Originally Posted by wind_chariot View Post well i have 'Man-eaters of Kumaon' and 'Temple tiger and more man-eaters of Kumaon' from Jim Corbett. I certainly know 'how' common tiger was in Garhwal and Kumaon region just over a hundread years ago...

So, i guess they are not at all present in the regions except for the tiger reserves?
In Tiger reserves! I doubt that to.

Eight years back while driving, pillion on scooter, from Chotmalpur to Dehradun,
After night shower in September or October, just after Mohand bridge, a fully drenched big cat (at that time we thought it was chitah, now we think it must be leopard or maybe tiger) was basking in early morning glory of sun, on side of road, sitting on big stone platform. It was only after we have passed the animal I informed driver, my cousin, a look back and his hands started shaking. We passed peacefully but my cousin was bit terrified because he was frequent on that stretch.

After this episode, I always look for that spot whenever, I drive that way but never spot anything else than langoors and monkeys. This highway route is part of Rajaji national park.
#27 Jul 12th, 2009, 00:56
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#27
Tigers in hills, not any more I guess... but Leopards are a frequent sighting...

In Apr this year, on a "on foot safari" in Binsar (near Almora) I had an amazing experience of sighting a Leopard... But these too are getting far and few...
All my Travels...
www.flickr.com/photos/saurabh_sunny/
A lot still pending though...............
#28 Jul 12th, 2009, 01:40
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#28
Well Kumaon is quite dry and manicured, far less of brush and weeds for the Leopard to be concealed, which is it's greatest skill. Pindari river becomes more rugged as we travel West to Garhwal where the terrain becomes more rugged. Pauri side has suffered a lot from maneaters because of lack of undergrowth. Bhagirathi valley maneaters are practically unheard of because of the protected forest regions and verticality of the hills.

Deer are there in the forests above here, so game is not yet a real problem although dogs do get taken frequently, notwithstanding that many dogs are left outside year round. However 91% of maneater attacks occur where the locations had no dogs present, 31% where there is no electricity. Would you rather a dog or electricity?
#29 Jul 12th, 2009, 09:20
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#29
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Originally Posted by cityMONK View Post
What of people to whom you have advised to grow bamboo and built
House with it , planting 3 to 4 trees around it.
That advice was only for eco friendly people who didn;t want to build with stones, steel, bricks etc. And the planting trees was also for people who wanted to keep 'loins share of greens' . As for me I am happy to have have two large tun trees next to my house if the leopard comes visiting all the better I can shoot it (with my camera ofcourse!). anyway lots of people around here live in houses made only of wooden beams and covered all around with grass and plastic, they are not scared of the leopard or perhaps have learnt to accept his nocturnal visits. It is all a matter of personal perception isn't it? Anyway I would not like to harp on the matter and bore the other forum members to death - figuratively speaking of course just in case you think it is meant literally!

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Some time back a strayed leopard was captured by zoo people from pucca home in posh sector of gurgoan, near delhi.Poor creature was hiding in their bathroom for whole night.
Happens all the time. I remember at least twice in Meerut when leopards were cornered in the center of the city. We are encroaching upon the traditional hunting grounds of animals so the animals have to travel farther and wider to feed themselves and in the process find themselves in concrete jungles and middle of human habitat where they are captured and put in a zoo for us to ogle at!
I believe there are more instances of people killing leopards than of leopards killing people and of course if we take into account humans attacking humans the number goes up ten folds or more! So Pers's perception is right - Homo Sapien is the most dangerous of all mammals that inhabit the earth.
He that would live in peace and at ease must not speak all he knows or all he sees. - Benjamin Franklin
#30 Jul 12th, 2009, 09:37
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#30
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Originally Posted by tilak2909 View Post never got to know about tigers outside reserve. many times heard about leopards (tendua) around gopeshwar and mandal. the road from chopta to chamoli is also famous for leopard sightings.. i have never seen
http://wotnews.com/like/leopard_kill...hamoli/684974/
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/H...ow/4392623.cms
Hey Tilak the next time you are in Uttarkashi you can spot some. We had two lots of guests who while walking back from our house after dinner spotted the prince of the jungle. One of the couples got so frightened that they jumped off the road and hurt themselves. The Leopard of course didn't pay any attention to the silly humans and continued on its way . Here the likelyhood of spotting the stealthy one are a lot more, specially early in the morning pre-dawn.
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