Touts & Beggars

Reply
#1 Jul 23rd, 2007, 03:27
Join Date:
Jul 2007
Location:
New York
Posts:
12
  • oceanfloater is offline
#1
I've experienced the persistance of touts in my previous journeys through Thailand and Bali. I've been approached while walking in front of their store, but never followed down the street. I've been on the beach in Bali and the touts plop themselves beside me and grab at my feet asking if I want pedicure or massage. Sometimes sitting with me for 5 minutes before moving on to hassle someone else. Will it be like that in India? Or is it worse?

How about beggars grabbing at you? How does one handle it and not break down. Any suggestions for reacting to this? It seems like a really heavy trip to have someone who is so in need and so poor clinging to you for help. I'm a compassionate person and I'm interested in other's experiences in India relating to this topic.
#2 Jul 23rd, 2007, 07:10
Join Date:
Jan 2005
Location:
yörp
Posts:
21,997
  • machadinha is offline
#2
... Try also this thread: How to deal with the beggars.
#3 Jul 24th, 2007, 01:53
Join Date:
Jul 2007
Location:
IL,USA
Posts:
35
  • DesiKid is offline
#3
Quote:
Originally Posted by oceanfloater View Post I've experienced the persistance of touts in my previous journeys through Thailand and Bali. I've been approached while walking in front of their store, but never followed down the street. I've been on the beach in Bali and the touts plop themselves beside me and grab at my feet asking if I want pedicure or massage. Sometimes sitting with me for 5 minutes before moving on to hassle someone else. Will it be like that in India? Or is it worse?

How about beggars grabbing at you? How does one handle it and not break down. Any suggestions for reacting to this? It seems like a really heavy trip to have someone who is so in need and so poor clinging to you for help. I'm a compassionate person and I'm interested in other's experiences in India relating to this topic.
Anything apart from "brown" skin(indians) attracts beggars..most of the times, even browns are not an exception...

While I'd love to donate, I'd rather not coz #1, it gets more number of touts around you #2, it spoils your mood..

My recommendation: Use the word "nahi"(spelt na-hi(like in hill))
which means NO..dont look at them, just keep walking and say "Nahi."
#4 Jul 24th, 2007, 02:28
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
68,287
  • Nick-H is offline
#4
If you want to be left alone, the first defence is absolutely avoiding any eye contact.

But, read the threads, you'll find all sorts of opinions, and make up your own mind. Personally I don't think any dogmatic answer is good enough on this one.
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#5 Jul 24th, 2007, 02:31
Join Date:
May 2007
Location:
New Delhi, India
Posts:
7,747
  • shashank.aggarwal is offline
#5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post If you want to be left alone, the first defence is absolutely avoiding any eye contact.
I second that...just simply avoid them...don't say anything and walk away briskly..
Foodiye - If you are looking for Indian Recipes and Eating out suggestions.
#6 Jul 24th, 2007, 02:36
Join Date:
Oct 2005
Location:
Abode of Glooscap
Posts:
10,517
  • PeakXV is offline
#6
Quote:
Originally Posted by shashank.aggarwal View Post I second that...just simply avoid them...don't say anything and walk away briskly..
I'll third that .... but if you do, be prepared for the "what's the matter you don't like Indians" desperation pitch line ..... which might catch the newbee off guard.
We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time. ~
T. S. Eliot

http://www.derekgrantdigital.com
#7 Jul 24th, 2007, 02:47
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
68,287
  • Nick-H is offline
#7
Like I said, read the other threads.

You'll find some of us argue in favour of, at least sometimes, giving to beggars.

'at least sometimes' --- like I just said, I don't believe that either dogma, never, or always, is a good answer to this one.
#8 Jul 24th, 2007, 02:53
Join Date:
May 2007
Location:
New Delhi, India
Posts:
7,747
  • shashank.aggarwal is offline
#8
Giving to beggars is a Punishable Offense...I am sure about the law in Delhi but not other states..

So if you give anything you are going against the law..
#9 Jul 24th, 2007, 02:59
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
68,287
  • Nick-H is offline
#9
I never heard anyone bothered about that.

So is riding a motorcycle without a helmet in Chennai!
#10 Jul 24th, 2007, 03:02
Join Date:
May 2007
Location:
New Delhi, India
Posts:
7,747
  • shashank.aggarwal is offline
#10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post So is riding a motorcycle without a helmet in Chennai!

try it in Delhi..it will straightaway set you back by Rs.600 atleast..and that too if cops do not find another chink in your armour..like missing pollution certificate...insurance..and other things...
#11 Jul 24th, 2007, 03:43
Join Date:
Jul 2007
Location:
Goa
Posts:
93
  • Barryjames is offline
#11
I have been writing a series of 'chronicles' on my experiences in Goa. In the introduction I note an article written by a 'person' employed by the tourist office. I disagree with almost everything that the writer has written.

He is so glaringly opposed to 'non Goans' that it raised my hackles.
This is just one of the items regarding Beggars, I have put into italics the writers observation. Followed by my answer. Obviously this is the shortened version.

Article: The famous and the rich Russian Musician who is knocking back kingfishers is offset by the three year old boy begging in the streets by putting his hand to his mouth to signify his hunger.

Most kids, though not all are hungry, it is relatively easy to distinguish the genuine cases, i.e. if they have any kind of footwear, have clean feet, feet that are lighter in colour than the rest of the leg, if you cannot see the sinew and pot belly, they are generally not hungry.

Generally, beggars make much more money from the tourist than a person in full time work, Daily wage here is about ,1:50 at best. Beggars can quadruple this easily. When the caring person identifies the genuine beggar, it is very hard to ignore their plight.

The reason why the author of the tourist article demonises these beggars is because they are so called migrants, as such they are unclean, lower caste, gypsies etc and they get money which could be going to the resident Goans. Fortunately not all Goans are as bigoted as the writer of the article. Next part is written by myself to answer this post.

Me personably? I give freely to all, does it really matter as long as the recipient gets something? Does it matter if some of the money gets diverted? The important thing is; the child/disabled or whatever, gets something. Ignore them, they get nothing at all.

Try and live with that.

~If you are a Christian, live within the confines of the commandments, if you are not but have a heart, ignore beggars and try living with yourself~
.....Me.....
#12 Jul 24th, 2007, 04:38
Join Date:
Sep 2001
Location:
UK
Posts:
16,662
  • steven_ber is offline
#12
Perhaps it's just me, or perhaps it's just the experiences I've had, but I feel I've changed over the years regarding beggars (and to a lesser extent, touts), I think I used to be a lot more accommodating than I am these days.

oceanfloater, imagine a hungry child (about 8-10 years old) with sorrowful eyes tugging at your clothes, now put a very young baby with no clothes into that child’s arms and place the child in a busy road dodging traffic....this is what you can face in India, your heart will tell you to give the child money, but I can assure you, after 3 or 4 times of giving money, you will have to deal with saying no to the child and the emotional hurt you will feel.

It's only a matter of time till you realise that when you give money, other children will race across busy roads to try to get money from you, everything inside you wants to protect the other child who's running in front of 2 taxis and a rickshaw to try to get to you, it's difficult to explain how it makes you feel inside, that child is only running across the road because they saw you giving money to another child, and all you were doing was trying to help, but wait, there's a third child racing across the road.......

The above scenario is mainly just in high-tourist areas and near large railway stations, but it does happen and it's incredibly difficult to deal with, the only way is to say no to the first child, you know, the 9 year old with the hungry sorrowful eyes and the baby in arms.

I guess I'm saying all this because India will be a huge shock after Thailand (I've not been to Bali), I never felt emotionally pressured by the beggars in Thailand, I never thought they were a big problem (and I've been to most tourist places in Thailand), and the touts were pussycats compared with the touts in India.

But you will have to deal with the beggars/touts in India the way all tourists have to, and it can be difficult, starting a thread here if the first step, but even with all the great advice you will get on indiamike, the emotional step is always the most difficult to overcome.
#13 Jul 24th, 2007, 08:06
Join Date:
Feb 2006
Location:
Dorset UK
Posts:
28
  • issac_new is offline
#13
I am curious to know how people here deal with hijiras - guys, usually castrated who dress in womens clothes and 'beg' in trains, often involving a bit of... uhh... flirtation. most people here would probably consider it begging, however i know many of the locals treat it very differently and are often much more inclined to give money. is this becuase they find it entertaining (like a busker), 'superstision'(ie they give money to ward off homosexuality), sympathetic (like your average begger), or are just they so embarrassed they pay them to stop.

your average street begger im ok with. but hijiras; they see me, the white guy on the train and... swoop on me... Do people here just ignore them or play along with their 'act'? can anyone associate with this?

Mark
#14 Jul 24th, 2007, 08:44
Join Date:
Jan 2005
Location:
yörp
Posts:
21,997
  • machadinha is offline
#14
I'd usually be friendly with them. They were with me.
#15 Jul 24th, 2007, 10:34
Join Date:
Jul 2007
Location:
India
Posts:
6
  • Prits is offline
#15
For touts and beggars, I've found that sunglasses and head phones are very effective. They can't see your eyes, you can't hear them. Always works.
Reply

Similar Threads

Title, Username, & Date Last Post Replies Views Forum
How to deal with the beggars Jan 31st, 2017 17:39 579 148994 India For Beginners
Beggars, street vendors at India's Taj Mahal scare away tourists Feb 25th, 2010 23:10 24 9639 India Travel News and Commentary
unique or memorable beggars or handouts Aug 13th, 2008 08:50 13 3191 Chai and Chat
Beggars on break, shit on sandal Aug 12th, 2005 06:49 15 4514 Humour - It Only Happens in India
Fed up of beggars, touristy Jaipur acts Oct 1st, 2004 12:08 16 6086 India Travel News and Commentary


Posting Rules

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Forum Rules»
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2
© IndiaMike.com 2017
Page Load Success