Useful Telugu words (as spoken in Hyderabad & Andhra Pradesh)

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#76 Jun 21st, 2009, 19:32
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#76
That is a very interesting link you've pasted, Hyderabadi. Very true, that the original term "hyderabadi" no longer means the same. It's now become more a mix of telugu-hindi-urdu than the original urdu speaking city with it's very unique culture. These days people doubt one's being Hyderabadi if he doesn't speak Telugu, whereas originally, a true-blue Hyderabadi did not speak Telugu at all. Anyway, guess we'll leave this topic here and let the Telugu translations for Billy continue
#77 Jun 21st, 2009, 20:12
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#77
Another book I keep recommending is Days Of The Beloved (Orient Longman): http://books.google.com/books?id=f5w...esult&resnum=2

I think I must have read it 3-4 times, it's time for another read..

#78 Jul 21st, 2009, 19:07
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#78
Truly amazing to me how many languages and dialects/combinations of languages there are in this country -- hell, in just this state.

I know the vast majority of you (on IM and at my work, anyway) speak a minimum of two languages, but usually more. They say that a child that grows up learning multiple languages will have an easier time learning new languages even after the language part of the brain is no longer 'sponge-like.' Have you guys experienced this? I suppose it's impossible for you to know what it's like NOT to have grown up with multiple languages, but does it seem like new languages come fairly easy?

This will just sound like foolishness, but when it comes to learning a new language, being a native English speaker is actually a hindrance -- we're never 'forced' to learn a second language by way of travel or business. There's just too damn many people with ESL. Hell, since the country instituted the new policy, there are more people learning English in China today than there are native English speakers in the world. Sheesh.
#79 Aug 23rd, 2009, 21:54
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Hmm, actually never gave that a thought, Billy...Urdu was spoken at home and English was taught at school...infact I actually began to learn how to read and write Urdu in grade 6...used to study Marathi till grade 5, and though I used to score very well in it, I have totally forgotten the language...I'm not sure whether growing up in a miltilingual atmosphere makes it easier to pick up a new language...may be i say that coz i've never been able to pick up telugu or kannada [except for the very basic stuff] though i lived in hyderabad and bangalore for about 10 years each...I feel one has to have that interest in languages to learn and speak fluently...like a few of my north indian collegemates in bangalore who'd never been exposed to any of the south indian big four, ended up being fluent speakers by the end of their 5 year stay in bangalore...i was simply amazed how they could do that when i never could learn to converse in them...so i'll put it on active interest in new lingos
#80 Aug 31st, 2009, 08:28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billyshake View Post ...............I know the vast majority of you (on IM and at my work, anyway) speak a minimum of two languages, but usually more. They say that a child that grows up learning multiple languages will have an easier time learning new languages even after the language part of the brain is no longer 'sponge-like.' Have you guys experienced this? I suppose it's impossible for you to know what it's like NOT to have grown up with multiple languages, but does it seem like new languages come fairly easy?..................
Quote:
Originally Posted by thepencilsmith View Post Hmm, actually never gave that a thought, Billy...Urdu was spoken at home and English was taught at school...infact I actually began to learn how to read and write Urdu in grade 6...used to study Marathi till grade 5, and though I used to score very well in it, I have totally forgotten the language...I'm not sure whether growing up in a miltilingual atmosphere makes it easier to pick up a new language...may be i say that coz i've never been able to pick up telugu or kannada [except for the very basic stuff] though i lived in hyderabad and bangalore for about 10 years each...I feel one has to have that interest in languages to learn and speak fluently...like a few of my north indian collegemates in bangalore who'd never been exposed to any of the south indian big four, ended up being fluent speakers by the end of their 5 year stay in bangalore...i was simply amazed how they could do that when i never could learn to converse in them...so i'll put it on active interest in new lingos
Complicated question once again Billy... I agree with thepencilsmith, mostly. I speak Telugu, English and Urdu/Hindi that's unique to Hyderabad quite fluently, I think. What's more important, imho, is 'Can you think in the language you are speaking?

I agree with thepencilsmith (TPC), when he says: "I'm not sure whether growing up in a miltilingual atmosphere makes it easier to pick up a new language..".

If it were easier, I would be thinking in Tamil, Kannada, Gujerati and Tagalog. And, that would be dangerous.
#81 Aug 31st, 2009, 08:40
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#82 Sep 1st, 2009, 02:18
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#82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyderabadi View Post http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8ZcPGa84a8


I haven't watched this movie in a while! What is it called again?

How are the sequels? Are they just as good?
#83 Sep 1st, 2009, 02:37
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The best were Hyderabad Nawabs and Angrez (that video is from Angrez I think). The other one Hyderabad Bakra or whatever shot in Dubai, was boring. I think they had one more called Fun Aur Masti, haven't watched that yet.
#84 Oct 28th, 2009, 01:16
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#84

old telugu words

nice forum with useful info.

However,i am looking for meaning of some old telugu words
found in a carnatic song. does anyone know the meaning of these
words? Is there any other websites that can help? Online dictionaries don' seem to have these words



words:

techchi chaapakappa
Akshayaavula
lega dooda
Thushtuga poo (or thusjtu gapoo)

---------------------
chaala thanks anti

chandramouli
#85 Oct 28th, 2009, 05:40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chandran View Post words:

techchi chaapakappa
Akshayaavula
lega dooda
Thushtuga poo (or thusjtu gapoo)
techchi: bring/to bring/brought... depends on context.

lega dooda: calf

Not sure what the rest are, they do seem vaguely Telugu but don't seem to make sense, eg.: chaapakappa : fishfrog.
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#86 Oct 28th, 2009, 09:23
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#86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyderabadi View Post techchi: bring/to bring/brought... depends on context.

lega dooda: calf

Not sure what the rest are, they do seem vaguely Telugu but don't seem to make sense, eg.: chaapakappa : fishfrog.
Hyderabadi,

Could this be it?

Chaapa - floor mat (the one people sit/sleep on?)
Kappa - wrapping (a variation of kappu/kappadum)
#87 Oct 28th, 2009, 18:21
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#87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ignite View Post Hyderabadi,

Could this be it?

Chaapa - floor mat (the one people sit/sleep on?)
Kappa - wrapping (a variation of kappu/kappadum)
Yes, could be, but still does not make sense - why would anyone want to cover themselves or someone else with a floor mat ? Especially in a 'carnatic song'? I'm not saying it's impossible, just thinking it's unlikely in a carnatic song.

Seriously, could depend on the context as I mentioned. Chandran, could you please tell us what song this is?
#88 Nov 4th, 2009, 06:29
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#88
good job guys..promoting telugu....i also know a bit now
#89 Feb 9th, 2010, 21:01
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#89
Quote:
Originally Posted by billyshake View Post I'm currently being tutored in Telugu and I'm collecting quite the phrase book. I would like to add phrases to this list (though without Hindi translations -- just English to Telugu). Is it possible to insert a table?

For now, I'll just offer a very useful phrase:

"Nenu paniki rani tagobhotu."
I am a useless a drunkard.
hi billyshake this is srinivas from india
hey nenu neetho matladali nee details cheppava
#90 Feb 9th, 2010, 21:06
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#90
Moderator Note:

Well, palemoni or srinivas, welcome to IndiaMike.

BUT, the language of this Forum is English! Please translate your Telugu. Thanks.
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