Tourist Trampled to Death

Reply
#61 Aug 21st, 2009, 00:04
Join Date:
Sep 2005
Location:
styx
Posts:
21,278
  • capt_mahajan is offline
#61
Not to talk of some forest dept. officials in cahoots with timber merchants, decimating trees within protected areas.
.
This is computer generated drivel. No signature is required.
#62 Aug 23rd, 2009, 22:04
Join Date:
Sep 2006
Location:
PORTSMOUTH U.K.
Posts:
1,554
  • CliveG is offline
#62
'All resorts in the area have been told not to take foreign or domestic tourists into the forests'.
Does this mean all trekking is currently banned? Are jeeps still allowed in with tourists?
#63 Aug 23rd, 2009, 23:17
Join Date:
May 2008
Location:
Back in Jolly ol' Blighty!
Posts:
8,243
  • Haylo is offline
#63
Quote:
Originally Posted by CliveG View Post 'All resorts in the area have been told not to take foreign or domestic tourists into the forests'.
Does this mean all trekking is currently banned? Are jeeps still allowed in with tourists?
The way I read it, the forest where this happened was not part of the national park.
______________________________ ______________________________ _________________

The world is mud-luscious and puddle-wonderful - E.E. Cummings, poet (1894-1962)

My India Photos Re-Entry Permit from: UK & USA ~ MHA Tourist Visa FAQ ~ MHA Employent & Business Visa FAQ ~ MHA Student Visa FAQ ~ MHA Entry Visa FAQ .
#64 Aug 24th, 2009, 00:26
Join Date:
Aug 2005
Location:
India
Posts:
1,225
  • anar is offline
#64
i tend to keep a safe distance from even the tame ones. so many instances of elephants going berserk for various reasons.
#65 Aug 27th, 2009, 18:16
Join Date:
Nov 2008
Location:
Madrid
Posts:
1,032
  • Dacoit Chief is offline
#65

French tourist killed by elephant in Mudumalai

This happened a few days ago, but it's worth mentioning. A french lady was trampled to death whilst photographing wild elephants with calves in Mudumalai. The local police say her death was "avoidable", had proper precautions been taken by the people responsible for the safari trip, which had been organised by a local resort. Though it may be a reputable resort, the accident happened on the edge of Mudumalai national park, and was not a trip authorised in any way by the park staff. Most trips in and around Mudumalai are inofficial like this.

It's possibly a knee-jerk reaction, but a number of the resort staff have been arrested, including the boss! The resort has also been shut down!

It seems fairly obvious, but tourists should never be able to get too close to elephants whilst they have calves. Even when elephants do charge, a properly trained guide will know what to do.

Worth bearing in mind for visitors!

http://in.reuters.com/article/topNew...41774820090815
#66 Aug 27th, 2009, 18:43
Join Date:
May 2009
Location:
India
Posts:
813
  • WeaKnee is offline
#66
Missed this news item and thanks for posting. Blue Valley is an old and popular establishment. Sad, they could not avoid this.
#67 Aug 27th, 2009, 19:03
Join Date:
Nov 2008
Location:
Madrid
Posts:
1,032
  • Dacoit Chief is offline
#67
Oops. I did a search, for this but posted a duplicate thread. Sorry!

I did not know Blue valley too well, but there are a number that I have been to in that area. ALL of them organise their own safari rides outside of the core park area, often at night with high intensity spot lights etc. Not necessarily saying any of this is wrong, but a bit more training for the people who organise these wouln't go amiss!

I think it really is up to the park authorities to do a bit more training for people working for commercial businesses in the area. The attitude of the park authorities is always, tourists should only go on our their tours. However, these are often poorly timed, inflexible and over crowded. Also they do not organise anything at night which is when most animals can be seen.

On the other hand, the private tour operators are a lot more flexible but it looks like they may sometimes cross the line. I suspect there will be a heavy governement clampdown on licensing all of these now! So typical!! The only net effect will be that all prices will go up!


Mod Note:

Two threads on this subject have been merged.
#68 Aug 27th, 2009, 19:19
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
68,620
  • Nick-H is offline
#68
Quote:
... often at night with high intensity spot lights etc. Not necessarily saying any of this is wrong, but a bit more training for the people who organise these wouln't go amiss!
It sounds very wrong to me! There is no way that spotlights are not going to disturb animals.

It sounds to me as if commercial interest has taken over, and the authorities are not doing anything about it.

I wonder if commercial India wouldn't eat itself from the feet upwards if someone suggested there was a quick buck to be made saved on it
~
Life gets aadhar every day.
.
#69 Aug 27th, 2009, 19:37
Join Date:
Nov 2008
Location:
Madrid
Posts:
1,032
  • Dacoit Chief is offline
#69
Your probably right Nick! I'm not condoning their practices in any way. I am basically just trying to say that the private sector is not necessarily much worse than the public sector. In fact in many ways, it is the private sector which have made most advances in eco-tourism for example. Ofcourse it's all for money, but it somehow does also work!

My main point is just that the national parks are so poorly equipped these days to cater for mass tourism, which is inevitable in India as it is. This is why there is a periphary private sector industry in the first place. My point is that the national parks need to some extent work hand-in-hand with the private sector to make sustainable wildlife tourism work in India!

You'll be surprised how much international money is currently being thrown at the Indian government to try and implemement efficient wildlife management in India. Of course, the vast majority of it will never have anything to do with wildlife.
#70 Aug 27th, 2009, 20:51
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
68,620
  • Nick-H is offline
#70
I think that the key is control: law and order applied regardless of money or influence.

Yes, there are some great eco-tourism projects, where the making of money (no objection to that; it has to be done!) goes hand in hand with proper concern and control. The ones I've heard of have, I think, been rather expensive, higher-end resorts.
#71 Aug 29th, 2009, 05:23
Join Date:
Oct 2007
Location:
Devon, UK
Posts:
279
  • Britishraj is offline
#71

Charged By a Rhino

While 'treking' in the Royal Chitwan National Park with a member of staff from our hotel, who claimed to be a guide, to photograph Rhino and just for the sheer adventure. My friend and myself started the journey in a 'dug-out' boat and paddled down to a point where we disembarked to start our trek. I must confess, at first it seemed as though it was going to be a stroll in the park. We foolishly decided on a 10 hr. trek!
However, at the onset the guide made a few points and intructions to make us aware of the possible dangers.
1. Animals are unpredictable so he could not guarantee us to see any rhino / elephant / sloth bear / tiger.
2. We must at all times be alert.
3.Talk in whispers, or use hand signals.
4.In case we unexpectedly came accross a rhino, climb the nearest tree!...at my age this was Not going to be easy. or look for Fat tree? to run around..Help! it's begining to sink in. My playng at Tarzan has long past.
5.and there's more! If we are charged by a Rhino it's everyone for themselves..when's the next dugout out of here?
Did I mention the guide was only carrying a stick! So I asked a silly question: What happens if we come accross a Tiger? 'Oh not to worry you wont see one.
Our backpacks full to capacity for the 10hr. trek ahead we set off. It was no more the stroll in the park. Every twig that broke underfoot, every sudden noise of birds was an alert. I kept concentrating on trees I could climb or fat trees to run around. Our first big scare came when we walked thro' elephant grass. You can't see anything as you phiscally push your way thro' the Tall grass. We heard the thunder of hooves, the guide signalled us to stop. We were frozen, s... scared as the wall of sound was approaching and not knowing what was about to appear. When they emerged speedliy passing accross us it was a herd of Sambar deer. It could have been anything. I hated the elephant grass areas where there were no trees! and you felt extremely vulnerable.
About 3 hrs into the trek we came accross a Rhino taking a mud bath in a dried up river. We approached very caustiously and took our photos, all the time sizing up the trees around me. The trek continued thro' dense jungle at times and the remains of a forest fire at one juncture. It was unbearably hot, we had now been walking for 8 hrs and very weary. We were informed we were at the last stage of our trek. Could'nt wait for it to finish, just an 'open'field to cross, one more dreaded 'elephant grass' crossing then to the safety of a jungle with trees to climb.
We're at the edge of the jungle about to expose ourselves as we cross the open field towards the last swathe of elephant grass.
The guide decides to play safe and climb a tree to get an overview of the area. He points out there are 6 trees in the middle of the elephant grass to which we must reach.
We walk out into the open field and as we get half way, suddenly, out of the elephant grass towards which we our going a rhino comes charging out. It had'nt spotted us and the guide shouted 'run for the trees' I swear, had Usain Bolt been there he would not have been as fast. The guide was out of sight. My friend and myself kept running. Fortunaely, the rhino kept running in the opposite direction and ha not spotte us. We're clear..slow down I thought, after 8hrs. my legs were like lead. But what happened next, still going towards the elephant grass and now yet another Rhino charges out of the elephant grass but much, much closer this time. This time my friend disappears from view. My spirit tells me to MOVE..and my body says 'who me?' The rhino slows almost to a stop, he has spotted me and I can see it start to turn as I disappear into the elephant grass. He's out of sight now..time to have a breather..I can't run anymore, anyway I'll swing my backpack at him should he attack. Crazy thoughts conjures in my mind fr that instant. I get my second wind and run for all I'm worth in the direction of the trees. I enter the copse of trees and my compatriots shouting. The guide reaches down and pulls me up. At this very moment, the Rhino comes charging in from a different diection. It had turn around and stalked us. We then proceded to make a lot of noise to frighten it off. As we were perched in the trees for the next hour until we thought it was safe to come down and get underway, I reflected on the journey we had undertaken, and remembered what the guide had said at the begining: should we be charged by a rhino it's everyman for himself. I had put myself in this situation...animals are unpredictable. Incidently, the very next day a villager was killed by a tiger in the same area we had been.
Elvis Has Left The Building
#72 Aug 29th, 2009, 10:15
Join Date:
Dec 2006
Location:
SLC
Posts:
1,704
  • kmalik is offline
#72
Britishraj,

Very interesting experience! I can imagine it might have been frightening and exhilarating at the same time. Also, whether the guide was trained rhino expert or just a poor sod trying to make a living - I doubt it would have made much difference in the outcome.

There simply is an element of risk for the reward of seeing somewhat dangerous wildlife outside the zoo. I too have come across grizzlies a couple of times on the trail - once rather too close for comfort. Perhaps some of scariest moments in my life - as well as the most exciting and memorable ones.

I think this notion that training and safety procedures somehow eliminate the risks is just theory. In practice, visiting areas with dangerous wildlife is, well, dangerous - and sometimes those dangers come true, well or poorly trained guide notwithstanding. In both cases - rhinos and elephants - when the animal charges everyman for himself is about the right course.

I don't know if that was the point you were making, so I apologize if I am taking it in a different direction. In any case, very enjoyable post!
#73 Aug 29th, 2009, 16:56
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
68,620
  • Nick-H is offline
#73
Great post, Britishraj.
#74 Aug 29th, 2009, 17:14
Join Date:
May 2008
Location:
Back in Jolly ol' Blighty!
Posts:
8,243
  • Haylo is offline
#74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Britishraj View Post 5.and there's more! If we are charged by a Rhino it's everyone for themselves.
I think that was very professional of him to warn you of the dangers upfront, there is absolutely no point in an unarmed guide pretending that he could do anything whatsoever to protect his clients against a charging rhino!

Sounds like a frightening and amazing experience. The sort of event that, if you survive it unscathed, becomes better and better to remember the more time passes!
Reply

Similar Threads

Title, Username, & Date Last Post Replies Views Forum
Applied for 1-year Tourist, but got 6 months Tourist Visa Oct 14th, 2010 12:01 37 7512 For Citizens of Other Countries - Visa and PIO/OCI Questions
Near Death Experiences Jan 15th, 2007 16:45 21 2734 Health and Well Being in India
English Tourist death - Nov 2003 May 4th, 2005 01:20 2 1446 Goa
DJ's death? Mar 9th, 2005 01:34 0 1625 Goa


Posting Rules

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Forum Rules»
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2
© IndiaMike.com 2018
Page Load Success